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Open AccessArticle

Not All Emotional Demands Are the Same: Emotional Demands from Clients’ or Co-Workers’ Relations Have Different Associations with Well-Being in Service Workers

1
Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA), Malmö University, 21119 Malmö, Sweden
2
Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA) & the Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, 21119 Malmö, Sweden
3
Centre for Workplace Excellence, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(21), 7738; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17217738
Received: 21 September 2020 / Revised: 16 October 2020 / Accepted: 20 October 2020 / Published: 22 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Health: Emotions in the Workplace)
There has been an increased interest in the study of emotional demands (ED) at work and its impact on workers’ well-being. However, ED have been conceptualized as a unitary concept, focused on interactions with clients, and excluding other potential sources of ED at work. Therefore, the aim of the current study is to explore the relation between ED from different relational sources (clients/patients/customers and colleagues, supervisors, and employees) and service workers’ exhaustion and engagement. Cross-sectional data from a sample of 2742 service workers were analysed using structural equation modelling. Results showed that ED from both sources (clients and colleagues) were associated with more emotional exhaustion, particularly if dealing with clients was not an integrated part of the role. Further, ED from clients’ relations were negatively associated with engagement for managers with staff responsibility, but positively for managers without staff responsibility. We also found moderating effects of psychosocial safety climate (PSC), whereby ED had the strongest effect on emotional exhaustion when PSC was low. This study suggests that different relational sources of ED at work have a different impact on employees’ well-being. Strategies that promote a reduction of extra-role ED, and the development of a PSC in the organization, could therefore offer possible solutions to promote employees’ psychological well-being and motivation. View Full-Text
Keywords: emotional demands; emotional exhaustion; engagement; psychosocial safety climate; structural equation modelling; service work emotional demands; emotional exhaustion; engagement; psychosocial safety climate; structural equation modelling; service work
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MDPI and ACS Style

Duarte, J.; Berthelsen, H.; Owen, M. Not All Emotional Demands Are the Same: Emotional Demands from Clients’ or Co-Workers’ Relations Have Different Associations with Well-Being in Service Workers. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 7738. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17217738

AMA Style

Duarte J, Berthelsen H, Owen M. Not All Emotional Demands Are the Same: Emotional Demands from Clients’ or Co-Workers’ Relations Have Different Associations with Well-Being in Service Workers. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(21):7738. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17217738

Chicago/Turabian Style

Duarte, Joana; Berthelsen, Hanne; Owen, Mikaela. 2020. "Not All Emotional Demands Are the Same: Emotional Demands from Clients’ or Co-Workers’ Relations Have Different Associations with Well-Being in Service Workers" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 17, no. 21: 7738. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17217738

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