Special Issue "Obstetric Violence and Women's Health"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Women's Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Katarina Swahnberg
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Linnaeus University, 391 82 Kalmar, Sweden
Interests: global health; women’s health; violence against women; abuse in health care

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

I am guest editing a Special Issue on "Obstetric Violence and Women’s Health" in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, a peer-reviewed journal that publishes articles and communications in the interdisciplinary area of environmental health sciences and global health. For detailed information on the journal, please visit https://www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph.

Obstetric violence is a particular kind of abuse in health care that has been reported globally. Obstetric violence is a rather new concept often focusing on childbirth, (even when referring to maternal care which includes pregnancy), and overmedicalization, i.e. non-medically justified obstetric interventions. Other important components may be dehumanization and disrespectful and non-consented care, and the overall conversion of biological processes into pathological ones. The imbalance of information and power between health care provider and the patient is an important conditional factor, but other intersecting factors on individual as well as structural level are also crusial for the persistens occurrence of obstetric violence.

This Special Issue welcome original research and reviews from all over the world that explore obstetric violence and its prevention. We are particularly interested in studies that test interventions that target policy, systems, and clinical change. Research may be either theoretical or empirical and can include systematic reviews.

Prof. Katarina Swahnberg
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Obstetric violence
  • Abuse in health care
  • Structural violence
  • Women’s health
  • Gender
  • Power
  • Intervention
  • Prevention
  • Empowerment

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Disrespect and Abuse Experienced by Women during Childbirth in Midwife-Led Obstetric Units in Tshwane District, South Africa: A Qualitative Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(10), 3667; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17103667 - 22 May 2020
Abstract
The disrespect and abuse (D&A) of women during childbirth is common and a great concern in midwifery-led obstetric units (MOUs) in South Africa. This paper used the seven chapters of the Respectful Maternity Care Charter as a framework to explore women’s experiences of [...] Read more.
The disrespect and abuse (D&A) of women during childbirth is common and a great concern in midwifery-led obstetric units (MOUs) in South Africa. This paper used the seven chapters of the Respectful Maternity Care Charter as a framework to explore women’s experiences of care during childbirth and examine the occurrence of D&A during childbirth in MOUs. Five focus group interviews were conducted with postnatal women aged 18 to 45 years selected purposively from MOUs in Tshwane District in South Africa. The discussions were audio-recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using a thematic approach and NVivo11 computer software. D&A of women was common during labor and childbirth. Verbal abuse in the form of shouting, labeling, judging, and rude remarks was the common form of D&A. Some of the women were abandoned and neglected, which resulted in their giving birth without assistance. Furthermore, the midwives violated their rights and denied them care such as pain relief medication, birth companions during childbirth, and access to ambulance services. Midwives are at the center of the provision of maternity care in MOUs in South Africa. Therefore, there is a need to strengthen interventions to adopt and implement policies that promotes respectful, nonabusive care during childbirth in MOUs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Obstetric Violence and Women's Health)

Review

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Open AccessReview
Decision-Making Process in Female Genital Mutilation: A Systematic Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(10), 3362; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17103362 - 12 May 2020
Abstract
Female genital mutilation/cutting “FGM/C” is a deep-rooted damaging practice. Despite the growing efforts to end this practice, the current trends of its decline are not enough to overcome the population’s underlying growth. The aim of this research is to investigate the FGM/C household [...] Read more.
Female genital mutilation/cutting “FGM/C” is a deep-rooted damaging practice. Despite the growing efforts to end this practice, the current trends of its decline are not enough to overcome the population’s underlying growth. The aim of this research is to investigate the FGM/C household decision-making process and identify the main household decision-makers. A review of peer-reviewed articles was conducted by searching PubMed, JSTOR, Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid EMBASE, EBSCO, and CINAHL Plus via systematic search using keywords. The found publications were screen using inclusion and exclusion criteria in line with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. After critical appraisal, seventeen articles were included in this review. The data extracted from the articles regarding FGM/C household-decision making process and decision-makers were analyzed using narrative analysis. FGM/C decision-making process varies from a region to another; however, it generally involves more than one individual, and each one has different power over the decision. Fathers, mothers, and grandmothers are the main decision-makers. It was shown from this review that opening the dialogue regarding FGM/C between sexes may lead to a productive decision-making process. The participation of fathers in the decision-making may free the mothers from the social-pressure and responsibility of carrying on traditions and create a more favorable environment to stop FGM/C practice. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Obstetric Violence and Women's Health)
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