Special Issue "Neuroprotection and Treatment in Intensive Care and Perioperative Medicine"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Łukasz J. Krzych
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Guest Editor
Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland
Interests: perioperative medicine; intensive care medicine; biomarkers; fluid therapy; hemodynamics; delirium
Ass. Prof. Mirosław Czuczwar
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Assistant Guest Editor
2nd Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Medical University of Lublin, Lublin, Poland
Interests: perioperative medicine; intensive care medicine; pharmacology; fluid therapy; nutrition
Dr. Izabela Duda
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Assistant Guest Editor
Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland
Interests: anesthesiology; neurosurgery; biomarkers; prognostication

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Perioperative medicine covers a broad spectrum of pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions needed to guarantee patients’ safety and to minimize the risk of complications. Both functional and structural neurologic injury represent a serious hazard of the compromised outcome in anesthesiology and intensive care medicine. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in preventive measures and treatment strategies that could be implemented to reduce insults to the brain. Goal-directed therapy is recommended to all subjects at risk of neurologic complications. However, effective neuroprotection and adequate treatment are still in question.

This Special Issue seeks high-quality manuscripts on neuroprotection and treatment of patients undergoing cardiac and noncardiac surgery, as well as in the critically ill. We welcome original papers, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses, and thorough reviews on this interesting topic. We would be happy if this Special Issue provides a complex source of up-to-date data used by anesthesiologists and intensive care specialists worldwide to improve perioperative care.

Prof. Łukasz J. Krzych
Ass. Prof. Mirosław Czuczwar
Dr. Izabela Duda
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Cognitive dysfunction and postoperative delirium in cardiac and noncardiac surgery
  • Potentially deleterious exposition on volatile agents in children and elderly patients
  • Biomarkers of neurological injury in anesthesiology and intensive care medicine
  • Perioperative stroke
  • Preventive strategies in neurosurgery and non-neurosurgery patients
  • Treatment of brain edema
  • Neurocognitive sequelae of critical illness

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Ultrasonic Assessment of Optic Nerve Sheath Diameter in Patients at Risk of Sepsis-Associated Brain Dysfunction: A Preliminary Report
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(10), 3656; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17103656 - 22 May 2020
Abstract
Sepsis-associated brain dysfunction (SABD) with increased intracranial pressure (ICP) is a complex pathology that can lead to unfavorable outcome. Ultrasonographic measurement of optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) is used for non-invasive assessment of ICP. We aimed to assess the role of ONSD as [...] Read more.
Sepsis-associated brain dysfunction (SABD) with increased intracranial pressure (ICP) is a complex pathology that can lead to unfavorable outcome. Ultrasonographic measurement of optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) is used for non-invasive assessment of ICP. We aimed to assess the role of ONSD as a SABD screening tool. This prospective preliminary study covered 10 septic shock patients (5 men; aged 65, IQR 50–78 years). ONSD was measured bilaterally from day 1 to 10 (n = 1), until discharge (n = 3) or death (n = 6). The upper limit for ONSD was set at 5.7 mm. Sequential organ failure assessment score was calculated on a daily basis as a surrogate formulti-organ failure due to sepsis in the study population. On day 1, the medians of right and left ONSD were 5.56 (IQR 5.35–6.30) mm and 5.68 (IQR 5.50–6.10) mm, respectively, and four subjects had bilaterally elevated ONSD. Forty-nine out of 80 total measurements performed (61%) exceeded 5.7 mm during the study period. We found no correlations between ONSD and sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) during the study period (right: R = −0.13–0.63; left R = −0.24–0.63). ONSD measurement should be applied for screening of SABD cautiously. Further research is needed to investigate the exact role of this non-invasive method in the assessment of brain dysfunction in these patients. Full article
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