Special Issue "Postoperative Pain Treatment and Prevention"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Mirosław Czuczwar
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Therapy, Medical University of Lublin, 20-093 Lublin, Poland
Interests: perioperative medicine; intensive care medicine; pharmacology; fluid therapy; nutrition
Dr. Paweł Piwowatrczyk
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Therapy, Medical University of Lublin, 20-093 Lublin, Poland
Interests: regional anesthesia; neurotoxicity of anesthetic drugs; obstetric anesthesia
Dr. Kazimierz Widenka
E-Mail
Co-Guest Editor
Medical College, Rzeszów University, 35-310 Rzeszów, Poland.
Interests: minimally invasive cardiac surgery; ERAS protocol in cardiac surgery; acute postoperative pain; postoperative chronic pain prevention
Dr. Michał Borys
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Therapy, Medical University of Lublin, 20-093 Lublin, Poland
Interests: acute postoperative pain; postoperative chronic pain prevention; regional anesthesia; obstetric anesthesia

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are a multi-disciplinary team of anesthesiologists and surgeons devoted to delivering patient-focused care. We aim to launch a Special Issue on Postoperative Pain Treatment and Prevention in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. The venue is a peer-reviewed scientific journal that publishes articles and communications in the interdisciplinary area of health sciences and public health. For detailed information about the journal, please refer to the journal website (https://www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph).

Over 200 million major surgeries are performed annually worldwide. Even though the World Health Organization proclaimed pain relief and management as a fundamental human right, many patients experience moderate or severe pain in the postoperative period. According to different variables (e.g., type of surgery, pain measurement tool, time of assessment, and patient sex and age), acute postoperative pain may be categorized as moderate or severe in approximately 60% to 80% of cases. A significant number of patients are also likely to suffer from chronic postsurgical pain, which is one of the most common complications following surgery, with increasing evidence of both its prevalence and intensity. Surprisingly, the introduction of new analgesic techniques and drugs and the implementation of national guidelines for pain management did not significantly influence inadequately treated pain, both acute and chronic postoperative. This Special Issue aims to present the latest findings on the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnostics, management, and prevention of perioperative pain. We are also open to any other subject area related to acute and chronic pain in the perioperative setting. The listed keywords suggest just a few of the many possibilities.

Dr. Mirosław Czuczwar
Dr. Michał Borys
Dr. Kazimierz Widenka
Dr. Paweł Piwowatrczyk
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • postoperative pain management
  • analgesia
  • analgesics
  • multimodal analgesia
  • chronic postsurgical pain
  • opioids
  • regional anesthesia
  • enhanced recovery after surgery pathway
  • neuropathic pain

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Effectiveness of Fascia Iliaca Compartment Block after Elective Total Hip Replacement: A Prospective, Randomized, Controlled Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 4891; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094891 - 04 May 2021
Viewed by 223
Abstract
Objective: An assessment of the feasibility of fascia iliaca compartment block (FICB) combined with nonopioid analgesics and patient controlled analgesia (PCA), oxycodone, in the perioperative anaesthetic management for elective total hip replacement (THR). Design: A randomised, single-center, open-label study. Setting: A single hospital. [...] Read more.
Objective: An assessment of the feasibility of fascia iliaca compartment block (FICB) combined with nonopioid analgesics and patient controlled analgesia (PCA), oxycodone, in the perioperative anaesthetic management for elective total hip replacement (THR). Design: A randomised, single-center, open-label study. Setting: A single hospital. The study was conducted from October 2018 to May 2019. Participants: In total, 109 patients were scheduled for elective total hip replacement. Interventions: Postoperative FICB with 0.375% ropivacaine in conjunction with nonopioid analgesics (paracetamol, metamizole, and pregabalin) and oxycodone as rescue analgesia. Measurements: Pain intensity was measured using the Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NRS) at rest and during rehabilitation, the total dose of postoperative oxycodone required, the occurrence of opioid-related adverse events, patient hospitalisation time, and level of satisfaction. Follow-up period: 48 h. Main Results: A total of 109 patients were randomised into two groups and, of these, 9 were subsequently excluded from the analysis (three conversions to general anaesthesia, two failures to perform FICB, four failures to use the PCA pump). Patients in the FICB group received standard intravenous analgesia with FICB, and those in the control group were managed with standard intravenous analgesia only. Pain level measured with NRS was significantly lower at rest and during rehabilitation in the FICB group. Oxycodone use in the first 48 h was significantly higher in the control group (p < 0.001); additionally, the time to the first dose of rescue analgesia was significantly shorter (p < 0.001). In the control group, there was a higher rate of side effects and a significantly longer hospitalisation time (p < 0.001). Similarly, higher satisfaction with the applied analgesic treatment was noted in the FICB group. Conclusions: FICB in elective THR treatments is an effective form of analgesia, which reduces the need for opioids, the number of complications, the length of hospitalisation, and which ensures a high level of patient satisfaction with the analgesic treatment used. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov No. NCT04690647. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Postoperative Pain Treatment and Prevention)
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Open AccessArticle
Association of Gender, Painkiller Use, and Experienced Pain with Pain-Related Fear and Anxiety among University Students According to the Fear of Pain Questionnaire-9
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(8), 4098; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18084098 - 13 Apr 2021
Viewed by 373
Abstract
Anxiety and fear are determinants of acute and chronic pain. Effectively measuring fear associated with pain is critical for identifying individuals’ vulnerable to pain. This study aimed to assess fear of pain among students and evaluate factors associated with pain-related fear. We used [...] Read more.
Anxiety and fear are determinants of acute and chronic pain. Effectively measuring fear associated with pain is critical for identifying individuals’ vulnerable to pain. This study aimed to assess fear of pain among students and evaluate factors associated with pain-related fear. We used the Fear of Pain Questionnaire-9 to measure this fear. We searched for factors associated with fear of pain: gender, size of the city where the subjects lived, subject of academic study, year of study, the greatest extent of experienced pain, frequency of painkiller use, presence of chronic or mental illness, and past hospitalization. We enrolled 717 participants. Median fear of minor pain was 5 (4–7) fear of medical pain 7 (5–9), fear of severe pain 10 (8–12), and overall fear of pain 22 (19–26). Fear of pain was associated with gender, frequency of painkiller use, and previously experienced pain intensity. We found a correlation between the greatest pain the participant can remember and fear of minor pain (r = 0.112), fear of medical pain (r = 0.116), and overall fear of pain (r = 0.133). Participants studying medicine had the lowest fear of minor pain while stomatology students had the lowest fear of medical pain. As students advanced in their studies, their fear of medical pain lowered. Addressing fear of pain according to sex of the patient, frequency of painkiller use, and greatest extent of experienced pain could ameliorate medical training and improve the quality of pain management in patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Postoperative Pain Treatment and Prevention)
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Open AccessArticle
Erector Spinae Plane Block for Perioperative Analgesia after Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(7), 3625; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18073625 - 31 Mar 2021
Viewed by 451
Abstract
Erector spinae plane block was recently introduced as an alternative to postoperative analgesia in surgical procedures including thoracoscopies and mastectomies. There are no clinical trials regarding erector spinae plane block in percutaneous nephrolithotomy. The aim of our study was to test the efficacy [...] Read more.
Erector spinae plane block was recently introduced as an alternative to postoperative analgesia in surgical procedures including thoracoscopies and mastectomies. There are no clinical trials regarding erector spinae plane block in percutaneous nephrolithotomy. The aim of our study was to test the efficacy and safety of erector spinae plane block after percutaneous nephrolithotomy. We analyzed 68 patients, 34 of whom received erector spinae plane block. The average visual analogue scale score 24 h postoperatively was the primary endpoint. The secondary endpoints were nalbuphine consumption and the need for rescue analgesia. Safety measures included the mean arterial pressure, Ramsey scale score, and rate of nausea and vomiting. The visual analogue scale, blood pressure, and Ramsey scale were assessed simultaneously at 1, 2, 4, 6, 12, and 24 h postoperatively. The average visual analogue scale was 2.9 and 3 (p = 0.65) in groups 1 (experimental) and 2 (control), respectively. The visual analogue scale after 1 h postoperatively was significantly lower in the erector spinae plane block group (2.3 vs. 3.3; p = 0.01). The average nalbuphine consumption was the same in both groups (46 mL vs. 47.2 mL, p = 0.69). The need for rescue analgesia was insignificantly different in both groups (group 1, 29.4; group 2, 26.4%; p = 1). The mean arterial pressure was similar in both groups postoperatively (91.8 vs. 92.5 mmHg; p = 0.63). The rate of nausea and vomiting was insignificantly different between the groups (group 1, 17.6%; group 2, 14.7%; p = 1). The median Ramsey scale in all the measurements was two. Erector spinae plane block is an effective pain treatment after percutaneous nephrolithotomy but only for a very short postoperative period. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Postoperative Pain Treatment and Prevention)
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Open AccessArticle
Quadratus Lumborum and Transversus Abdominis Plane Blocks and Their Impact on Acute and Chronic Pain in Patients after Cesarean Section: A Randomized Controlled Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(7), 3500; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18073500 - 28 Mar 2021
Viewed by 446
Abstract
Background: Severe postoperative pain is a significant problem after cesarean sections. Methods: This study was a randomized, controlled trial of 105 patients conducted in two hospitals. All patients were anesthetized spinally for elective cesarean section. Each participant was randomly allocated to one of [...] Read more.
Background: Severe postoperative pain is a significant problem after cesarean sections. Methods: This study was a randomized, controlled trial of 105 patients conducted in two hospitals. All patients were anesthetized spinally for elective cesarean section. Each participant was randomly allocated to one of three study groups: the quadratus lumborum block (QLB) group, the transversus abdominis plane block (TAPB) group, or the control (CON) group. The primary outcome of this study determined acute pain intensity on the visual analog scale (VAS). The secondary outcomes determined morphine consumption and chronic pain evaluation according to the Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory (NPSI) after hospital discharge. Results: At rest, the pain intensity was significantly higher in the CON group than in the QLB and TAPB groups at hours two and eight. Upon activity, the pain in the control subjects was more severe than in the QLB and TAPB groups in three and two of five measurements, respectively. Moreover, morphine consumption was significantly lower in the QLB (9 (5–10)) and TAPB (10 (6–14)) groups than in the CON (16 (11–19)) group. Persistent postoperative pain was significantly lower in the QLB group than in the CON group at months one and six following hospital discharge. Conclusions: Both the QLB and TAPB can improve pain management after cesarean delivery. Moreover, the QLB might reduce the severity of persistent postoperative pain months after cesarean section. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Postoperative Pain Treatment and Prevention)
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