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Human Health Dynamics in the Mobile and Big Data Era

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2021) | Viewed by 20355

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Health Sciences (DSSS), University of Florence, 50135 Florence, Italy
Interests: nursing sciences; chronic, comorbid and complex cases assessment and treatment

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The information and communication technologies (ICTs) revolution currently allows brand new and effective tools to improve assessment, management, and intervention opportunities to improve wellbeing and health support. In particular, the possibility to ensure continuous (i.e., longitudinal) medical services overall for chronic, comorbid, and complex diseases would reduce the cost of extended traditional assistance. Such technologies could increase access to health-related services, allowing an adaptive (more effective) approach for assessment and intervention procedures. Moreover, insights coming from big data and mobile technologies could be exploited for the empowerment of both patients and caregivers throughout advanced and scientifically grounded ICT-based services (e.g., real-time counseling, coaching system, artificial intelligence, home-based computer system).
In this regard, technological advancements may play an interesting role in supporting therapeutic compliance, promoting wellbeing, and enhancing health-related protective factors (e.g., knowledge, self-efficacy).

Papers addressing these topics are invited for this Special Issue, especially those combining a high academic standard coupled with a practical focus.

Dr. Andrea Guazzini
Dr. Laura Rasero
Dr. Mirko Duradoni
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Longitudinal assessment
  • Adaptive assessment and intervention
  • Caregiver support
  • Therapeutic compliance
  • Chronic, comorbid, and complex patient management
  • Sustainable health and wellbeing
  • Epidemiology
  • Health impact
  • Risk assessment
  • Health and wellbeing
  • Health inequalities
  • Deprived communities
  • Health behaviors
  • Patient centered approach
  • Computer-based health information/support system
  • Big data based insights for health practices
  • Mobile and VR technologies supporting health

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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12 pages, 596 KiB  
Article
An Exploratory Study on the Effectiveness of Virtual Reality Analgesia for Children and Adolescents with Kidney Diseases Undergoing Venipuncture
by Barbara Atzori, Laura Vagnoli, Daniela Graziani, Hunter G. Hoffman, Mariana Sampaio, Wadee Alhalabi, Andrea Messeri and Rosapia Lauro-Grotto
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(4), 2291; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19042291 - 17 Feb 2022
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 3094
Abstract
The current study evaluated the effectiveness of VR analgesia among pediatric and adolescent patients with kidney disease undergoing venipuncture. Patients at an Italian Children’s hospital (N = 82, age range 7–17 years) undergoing venipuncture were randomly assigned to a No VR group (non-medical [...] Read more.
The current study evaluated the effectiveness of VR analgesia among pediatric and adolescent patients with kidney disease undergoing venipuncture. Patients at an Italian Children’s hospital (N = 82, age range 7–17 years) undergoing venipuncture were randomly assigned to a No VR group (non-medical conversation) vs. a Yes VR group (VR analgesia). After the procedure, patients gave 0–10 Verbal Numeric Pain Scale ratings. Compared with patients in the No VR Group, patients in the Yes VR group reported significantly lower “Pain intensity”(No VR mean = 2.74, SD = 2.76 vs. Yes VR mean = 1.56, SD = 1.83) and the VR group also rated “Pain unpleasantness” significantly lower than the No VR group (No VR mean = 2.41, SD = 0.94 vs. Yes VR mean = 1.17, SD = 1.80). Patients distracted with VR also reported having significantly more fun during the venipuncture procedure. No side effects emerged. In addition to reducing pain intensity, VR has the potential to make venipuncture a more fun and less unpleasant experience for children with CKD, as measured in the present study for the first time. Finally, in exploratory analyses, children aged 7–11 in the VR group reported 55% lower worst pain than control subjects in the same age range, whereas children aged 12 to 17 in the VR group only reported 35% lower worst pain than control subjects. Additional research and development using more immersive VR is recommended. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human Health Dynamics in the Mobile and Big Data Era)
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13 pages, 355 KiB  
Article
ASMR as Idiosyncratic Experience: Experimental Evidence
by Chiara Pedrini, Lorena Marotta and Andrea Guazzini
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(21), 11459; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182111459 - 30 Oct 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 5091
Abstract
The Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR) is a tingling sensation across the scalp that occur in response to specific triggering audio and visual stimuli, connected with the Default Mode Network. Our study (N = 76) aimed to test the neurophysiology of ASMR by [...] Read more.
The Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR) is a tingling sensation across the scalp that occur in response to specific triggering audio and visual stimuli, connected with the Default Mode Network. Our study (N = 76) aimed to test the neurophysiology of ASMR by examining pupil diameter and brain activity. Assuming the idiosyncratic nature of ASMR, we expected results detecting opposite physiological outcomes considering pupil diameter and brain activation. We used a battery of self-reports to investigate psychological dimensions; for the physiological measures, we used two instruments: PupilCore and NeuroSky MindWave Mobile 2. The results showed an augmented pupillary diameter during the ASMR video, regardless of the perception of tingles. On the other hand, the arousal level during the ASMR video was lower than the other conditions. The difference between the two neurophysiological measures appeared as peculiar and can be considered as the promoting phenomenon for ASMR psychological outcomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human Health Dynamics in the Mobile and Big Data Era)
14 pages, 1195 KiB  
Article
Effect of Water Amount Intake before Scuba Diving on the Risk of Decompression Sickness
by Kil-Hyung Han, Gwang-Suk Hyun, Yong-Seok Jee and Jung-Min Park
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(14), 7601; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18147601 - 16 Jul 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2643
Abstract
Background and objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of pre-hydration levels on circulating bubble formation for scuba divers and to evaluate the appropriate volume of water intake for reducing the risk of decompression sickness (DCS). Materials and [...] Read more.
Background and objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of pre-hydration levels on circulating bubble formation for scuba divers and to evaluate the appropriate volume of water intake for reducing the risk of decompression sickness (DCS). Materials and Methods: Twenty scuba divers were classified into four groups according to the volume of water taken in before scuba diving as follows: no-water-intake group (NWIG), 30%-water-intake group (30WIG), 50%-water intake group (50WIG), and 100%-water-intake group (100WIG). We measured the circulating bubbles using movement status by Doppler on the right and left subclavian veins and precordial regions at pre-dive, post-dive, and 30 min after diving to a depth of 30 m for a duration of 25 min at the bottom. Results: Participants belonging to the 30WIG showed the lowest frequency, percentage, and amplitude of bubbles and consequently the lowest bubble grade in the left and right subclavian veins and precordial region at post-time and 30 min after diving. Conclusions: It can be inferred that pre-hydration with 30% of the recommended daily water intake before scuba diving effectively suppressed the formation of bubbles after diving and decreased the risk of DCS. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human Health Dynamics in the Mobile and Big Data Era)
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15 pages, 1186 KiB  
Article
How Do Emotions during Goal Pursuit in Weight Change over Time? Retrospective Computational Text Analysis of Goal Setting and Striving Conversations with a Coach during a Mobile Weight Loss Program
by Heather Behr, Annabell Suh Ho, Ellen Siobhan Mitchell, Qiuchen Yang, Laura DeLuca and Andreas Michealides
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(12), 6600; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18126600 - 19 Jun 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3089
Abstract
During behavioral weight management, individuals reflect on their progress and barriers through goal pursuit (goal setting and goal striving). Emotions during goal pursuit are largely unknown, and previous investigations of emotions in weight management have primarily relied on self-report. In this retrospective study, [...] Read more.
During behavioral weight management, individuals reflect on their progress and barriers through goal pursuit (goal setting and goal striving). Emotions during goal pursuit are largely unknown, and previous investigations of emotions in weight management have primarily relied on self-report. In this retrospective study, we used a well-validated computational text analysis approach to explore how emotion words changed over time during goal setting and striving conversations with a coach in a mobile weight loss program. Linear mixed models examined changes in emotion words each month from baseline to program end and compared emotion words between individuals who set an overall concrete goal for the program (concrete goal setters) and those who set an overall abstract goal (abstract goal setters). Contrary to findings using self-report, positive emotion words were stable and negative emotion words significantly increased over time. There was a marginal trend towards greater negative emotion word use being associated with greater weight loss. Concrete goal setters used more positive words than abstract goal setters, with no differences in negative emotion words and weight loss. Implications include the possibility that individuals may need increasing support over time for negative emotions expressed during goal setting and striving, and concrete goals could boost positive emotion. Future research should investigate these possibilities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human Health Dynamics in the Mobile and Big Data Era)
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Review

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23 pages, 868 KiB  
Review
LEAP Motion Technology and Psychology: A Mini-Review on Hand Movements Sensing for Neurodevelopmental and Neurocognitive Disorders
by Giulia Colombini, Mirko Duradoni, Federico Carpi, Laura Vagnoli and Andrea Guazzini
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(8), 4006; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18084006 - 11 Apr 2021
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 5253
Abstract
Technological advancement is constantly evolving, and it is also developing in the mental health field. Various applications, often based on virtual reality, have been implemented to carry out psychological assessments and interventions, using innovative human–machine interaction systems. In this context, the LEAP Motion [...] Read more.
Technological advancement is constantly evolving, and it is also developing in the mental health field. Various applications, often based on virtual reality, have been implemented to carry out psychological assessments and interventions, using innovative human–machine interaction systems. In this context, the LEAP Motion sensing technology has raised interest, since it allows for more natural interactions with digital contents, via an optical tracking of hand and finger movements. Recent research has considered LEAP Motion features in virtual-reality-based systems, to meet specific needs of different clinical populations, varying in age and type of disorder. The present paper carried out a systematic mini-review of the available literature using Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis (PRISMA) guidelines. The inclusion criteria were (i) publication date between 2013 and 2020, (ii) being an empirical study or project report, (iii) written in English or Italian languages, (iv) published in a scholarly peer-reviewed journal and/or conference proceedings, and (v) assessing LEAP Motion intervention for four specific psychological domains (i.e., autism spectrum disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, dementia, and mild cognitive impairment), objectively. Nineteen eligible empirical studies were included. Overall, results show that protocols for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and autism spectrum disorder can promote psychomotor and psychosocial rehabilitation in contexts that stimulate learning. Moreover, virtual reality and LEAP Motion seem promising for the assessment and screening of functional abilities in dementia and mild cognitive impairment. As evidence is, however, still limited, deeper investigations are needed to assess the full potential of the LEAP Motion technology, possibly extending its applications. This is relevant, considering the role that virtual reality could have in overcoming barriers to access assessment, therapies, and smart monitoring. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human Health Dynamics in the Mobile and Big Data Era)
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