Promoters and Barriers of Vaccination

A special issue of European Journal of Investigation in Health, Psychology and Education (ISSN 2254-9625).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2023) | Viewed by 5554

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Social and Political Sciences, University of Florence, Florence, Italy
Interests: public sector communication; public sector organizations’ changes; digital and social media processes
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department Science of Education and Psychology, University of Florence, Florence, Italy
Interests: future internet

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The COVID-19 pandemic has generated an explosion of interest in the vaccination topic. Four years after patient zero, it is time to integrate the evidence that has emerged on the complex phenomenon of vaccination. The Special Issue aims to identify and model the factors that promote and inhibit vaccination (not only related to COVID-19) in a multidisciplinary way, including social, psychological, educational, health and experiential factors (e.g., contagion, development of long COVID syndrome).

Dr. Mirko Duradoni
Dr. Andrea Guazzini
Dr. Letizia Materassi
Dr. Maria Fiorenza
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • COVID-19 pandemic
  • SARS-CoV-2
  • COVID-19 vaccines
  • vaccination services
  • COVID-19 vaccine acceptance and hesitancy
  • global health
  • mental health
  • coping

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

15 pages, 699 KiB  
Article
Associations of Mental Health Issues with Health Literacy and Vaccination Readiness against COVID-19 in Long-Term Care Facilities—A Cross-Sectional Analysis
by Linda Sanftenberg, Maresa Gschwendner, Andreas Grass, Marietta Rottenkolber, Isabel Zöllinger, Maria Sebastiao, Thomas Kühlein, Dagmar Hindenburg, Ildikó Gágyor, Domenika Wildgruber, Anita Hausen, Christian Janke, Michael Hoelscher, Daniel Teupser, Tobias Dreischulte, Jochen Gensichen and on behalf of the BACOM Study Group
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2024, 14(3), 432-446; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe14030029 - 20 Feb 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 937
Abstract
Vaccinations against COVID-19 are of the utmost importance in long-term care facilities. During the pandemic, mental health issues increased significantly. This cross-sectional analysis aimed to assess the associations of depression and anxiety with health literacy in people in need of care and the [...] Read more.
Vaccinations against COVID-19 are of the utmost importance in long-term care facilities. During the pandemic, mental health issues increased significantly. This cross-sectional analysis aimed to assess the associations of depression and anxiety with health literacy in people in need of care and the association of depression and burnout with vaccination readiness against COVID-19 in health care workers (HCWs). Within our cross-sectional study, people in need of care were assessed for symptoms of depression (PHQ-9), anxiety (GAD-7), and health literacy (HLS-EU-Q16). Among HCWs, we assessed symptoms of depression (PHQ-9) and burnout (MBI-HSS), as well as psychological antecedents of vaccination (5C) to measure vaccination readiness against COVID-19. A multivariate regression analysis was performed. Symptoms of a major depression were significantly associated with reduced health literacy (p = 0.010) in people in need of care. Among HCWs, symptoms of depression and burnout reduced vaccination readiness against COVID-19 significantly. In particular, collective responsibility was reduced in HCWs suffering from burnout symptoms (p = 0.001). People in need of care and their HCWs could benefit from intensified target group-specific vaccination counseling. Additionally, more attention should be paid to the protection of mental health in long-term care facilities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Promoters and Barriers of Vaccination)
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12 pages, 290 KiB  
Article
Vaccine Hesitancy in Israel: Exploring the Relationships with Vaccination History, Knowledge, and Attitudes towards Influenza Vaccines
by Keren Dopelt, Sophie Yukther, Tatyana Shmukler and Anuar Abudin
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2024, 14(1), 37-48; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe14010003 - 22 Dec 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 922
Abstract
Influenza vaccination is a highly effective strategy for mitigating all the repercussions of influenza infections. Despite the potential severity of influenza and the accessibility of secure vaccinations, worldwide rates of influenza vaccination continue to be low, particularly among students. This study examines the [...] Read more.
Influenza vaccination is a highly effective strategy for mitigating all the repercussions of influenza infections. Despite the potential severity of influenza and the accessibility of secure vaccinations, worldwide rates of influenza vaccination continue to be low, particularly among students. This study examines the correlative relationships between influenza vaccine history, knowledge, attitudes toward influenza vaccines, and vaccine hesitancy among college students. To that end, we used an online questionnaire to conduct a cross-sectional study encompassing 610 students. A significant majority of participants reported having experienced influenza (82%), with slightly more than half having received influenza vaccinations in the past (57%). With respect to the current research year, health sciences students exhibited a higher likelihood of either having been vaccinated or intending to receive the vaccine than did their counterparts. Among students who had been vaccinated previously, approximately one-fifth opted for vaccination in the present year (21%). Similarly, 22% of the students whose parents were vaccinated chose to get vaccinated this year. Notable disparities in knowledge about influenza vaccines were observed across various departments, with health sciences students demonstrating the highest levels of awareness. Moreover, a negative relationship was found between knowledge, attitudes, and vaccine hesitancy. These results suggest that targeted lectures by professionals emphasizing vaccine safety and university-hosted events addressing this subject in collaboration with the Ministry of Health, incorporating influenza vaccination stations, could be instrumental in bolstering the vaccination rate. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Promoters and Barriers of Vaccination)
15 pages, 1334 KiB  
Article
A Moderated Mediation Model of the Influence of Cynical Distrust, Medical Mistrust, and Anger on Vaccination Hesitancy in Nursing Staff
by Athanasios Tselebis, Christos Sikaras, Charalampos Milionis, Eleni Paraskevi Sideri, Konstantinos Fytsilis, Styliani Maria Papageorgiou, Ioannis Ilias and Argyro Pachi
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2023, 13(11), 2373-2387; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe13110167 - 29 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1899
Abstract
During the pandemic, nurses experienced anger that stemmed from a sense of threat, frustration, or even a sense of injustice. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between vaccination hesitancy, anger, cynicism, and medical mistrust among nurses, as there are [...] Read more.
During the pandemic, nurses experienced anger that stemmed from a sense of threat, frustration, or even a sense of injustice. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between vaccination hesitancy, anger, cynicism, and medical mistrust among nurses, as there are no relevant studies in the literature. This study was conducted online by completing self-report questionnaires. The Dimensions of Anger Reactions-5, the 8-item “Cynical Distrust” scale, and the Medical Mistrust Multiformat Scale were used. For vaccination hesitancy, two questions with a 5-point scale were used: one question examining hesitancy to get vaccinated with the COVID-19 vaccine, and another question examining hesitancy to get vaccinated with the influenza vaccine. In total, 387 nurses (66 men and 321 women) participated in this study. Nurses showed statistically greater hesitancy toward the COVID-19 vaccine compared to hesitancy toward the influenza vaccine. The variation in vaccine hesitancy was explained by the scores in the Medical Mistrust Multiformat Scale, the Dimensions of Anger Reactions, and the Cynical Distrust Scale. The Medical Mistrust Multiformat Scale mediated the relationship between the Cynical Distrust Scale and total vaccine hesitancy. The Dimensions of Anger Reactions Scale significantly moderated the indirect effect of the Cynical Distrust Scale on total vaccine hesitancy through the Medical Mistrust Multiformat Scale. In conclusion, it is highly likely that anger is involved in reported vaccine hesitancy both by activating schemas of distrust in others and by adopting anti-systemic views of mistrust in the medical system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Promoters and Barriers of Vaccination)
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13 pages, 653 KiB  
Article
Impacts of a COVID-19 Educational Video: Evaluation of the Influence of Race, Gender, Political Affiliation, Study Major, and Age on Vaccine Acceptance among University Students
by Audrey J. Lee, Tiffany T. Vu, Reina Marie Sanz and Myo-Kyoung Kim
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2023, 13(9), 1738-1750; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe13090126 - 8 Sep 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1192
Abstract
Background: The World Health Organization (WHO) warns that vaccine hesitancy is an ongoing major global health threat. While vaccination against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) proves to be an effective strategy in protecting against the disease, vaccine hesitancy represents a major barrier [...] Read more.
Background: The World Health Organization (WHO) warns that vaccine hesitancy is an ongoing major global health threat. While vaccination against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) proves to be an effective strategy in protecting against the disease, vaccine hesitancy represents a major barrier to stopping the spread of the virus. Willingness for vaccination can be influenced by several factors, including education level and health literacy. Although several studies demonstrate the value of video educational programs in improving coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine knowledge and acceptance, no studies to date have evaluated if race, gender, and other demographic factors impact the influence of an educational video on COVID-19 vaccine knowledge and hesitancy among university students in the United States (U.S.). Aims: This study was conducted to determine the impact of an educational video on U.S. university undergraduate students’ COVID-19 vaccine perception and acceptance. It also aims to evaluate whether demographic factors affect the influence of the video. Methods: An online survey was used to measure perceived understanding and acceptance of COVID-19 vaccines before and after viewing a video regarding the effectiveness and safety of COVID-19 vaccinations. The impact of demographic factors on the Video Influence Score was analyzed. Key results: After viewing the video, respondents’ (n = 285) perceived awareness and acceptance of COVID-19 vaccines significantly increased (p < 0.05). In addition, gender, political party affiliation, age, study major, and influenza vaccination history did not significantly impact the Video Influence Score (p > 0.05). However, African American/Black respondents (3.81 ± 4.24) were significantly more influenced by the video compared to respondents of other races (p < 0.05), such as White/Caucasian (1.91 ± 3.75), Hispanic/Latino (0.17 ± 3.67), Asian (0.29 ± 1.53), and Indigenous American (0.64 ± 2.52). Conclusions: This study suggests the potential impact of an educational video on COVID-19 vaccine perception and acceptance among university students. Despite limitations such as a modest survey response rate, this study provides valuable insight concerning the influential factors affecting vaccine acceptance in diverse student populations. Future studies are warranted to explore how student response to vaccine educational videos may vary depending on students’ racial and cultural backgrounds. Implications: A targeted educational video to promote vaccine acceptance is a valuable tool for public health campaigns to combat vaccine hesitancy. The study also highlights the importance of tailoring interventions to specific demographic groups such as considering racial factors to maximize the impact of educational interventions on vaccine attitudes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Promoters and Barriers of Vaccination)
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