Special Issue "Functional Ingredients/Foods and Diet-Induced Obesity Associated Metabolic Diseases"

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Yunkyoung Lee
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Jeju National University, 102 Jejudaehak-ro, Jeju 63243, Korea
Interests: functional ingredients/foods; seaweeds; polysaccharide; inflammation; obesity; diabetes; gut microbiota
Dr. Guiguo Zhang
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Animal Nutrition, Shandong Agricultural University, Shandong 271018, China
Interests: polysaccharide; gut microbiota; animal nutrition; inflammation; antioxidant
Dr. Soonkyu Chung
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Nutrition, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003, USA
Interests: dietary polyphenols; n-3 PUFA; brown fat regulation; adipose tissue iron
Dr. Inhae Kang
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Food and Nutrition, Jeju National University, 102 Jejudaehak-ro, Jeju 63243, Korea
Interests: functional ingredients/foods; mitochondria; brown fat; aging, inflammation; obesity

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Obesity and its associated metabolic diseases are problematic for public health around the world. To find novel ingredients and foods to help control obesity and its associated metabolic diseases, scientists in various fields have been intensively studying potential functional ingredients and foods from mainly natural sources with the expectation of lower toxicity compared to synthetic compounds and/or drugs to treat metabolic diseases. With the increased consideration to well-being, even the healthy population has become a consumer for the functional foods. Although more research is required to understand the mechanisms of action of the functional ingredients and foods in manipulating the metabolic diseases, their potential health beneficial effects could improve public health as well as promote primary industry with higher added value.

This Special Issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH) aims to collect the current knowledge on functional ingredients and foods and diet-induced obesity and its associated metabolic diseases using both therapeutic and preventive approaches. Original research papers, reviews, case reports, brief reports, and communications are all welcome in this Issue.

Dr. Yunkyoung Lee
Dr. Guiguo Zhang
Dr. Soonkyu Chung
Dr. Inhae Kang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Functional foods/ingredients
  • Obesity
  • Metabolic diseases
  • Inflammation
  • Diabetes
  • Hypertension
  • Bioactivity

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Anti-Inflammatory Potential of Cultured Ginseng Roots Extract in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Mouse Macrophages and Adipocytes
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(13), 4716; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17134716 - 30 Jun 2020
Abstract
Wild ginseng, Panax ginseng Meyer, is a traditional medicine widely used in Asia. Due to low reward and high costs, wild ginseng is produced by a plant cell culture technique called cultured ginseng roots (GR). The health benefits of wild ginseng have [...] Read more.
Wild ginseng, Panax ginseng Meyer, is a traditional medicine widely used in Asia. Due to low reward and high costs, wild ginseng is produced by a plant cell culture technique called cultured ginseng roots (GR). The health benefits of wild ginseng have been well studied, but the potential health effects of GR are largely unknown. Thus, we investigated the role of a GR extract (GRE) on inflammatory responses. We firstly investigated the anti-inflammatory potential of GRE in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. GRE (100 μg/mL) dampened pro-inflammatory gene expression, cytokine release, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation. These anti-inflammatory responses by GRE were confirmed in mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs), which showed that GRE could inhibit inflammation with the induction of antioxidant levels. LPS was recently reported to impair mitochondrial bioenergetics in mouse macrophages. We next measured the mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate (OCR), determining mitochondrial function. LPS treatment downregulated OCR; however, GRE partially restored the LPS-mediated energy homeostasis defects. Furthermore, GRE-pretreated conditioned media (CM) obtained from mouse macrophages decreased CM-mediated adipocyte inflammation. Collectively, these data suggested that GRE attenuated LPS-induced inflammation, and it might be partially involved in the protection from mitochondrial dysfunction in macrophages and adipocytes. Full article
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