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Effect of Alcohol Consumption and Drug Use on Mental Health and Well-Being

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Behavioral and Mental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2024) | Viewed by 6201

Special Issue Editor

*
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Health Sciences, University of Greenwich, Old Royal Naval College, Park Row, London SE10 9LS, UK
Interests: problematic substance use; alcohol; mental health; health and wellbeing; personality disorders; age; young people ethnicity; special populations
* Reader: Alcohol Policy and Mental Health Studies.
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The link between alcohol and drug use and mood, affect, mental health and well-being has been an area of much research, treatment and policy interest. Dr John Foster, Reader in Alcohol Policy and Mental Health, School of Health Sciences, University of Greenwich, UK invites papers for a Joint Special Issue in the open access journals International Journal for Environmental and Public Health Research and Healthcare. In addition to papers from clinical and treatment settings, we welcome papers from all types of research paradigms. We particularly encourage qualitative, mixed-methods and interdisciplinary submissions, and hope researchers and scholars will view this as an opportunity for open and free academic communication. We are taking a very broad view of affect, mood and mental health and welcome research which considers this across the lifecourse, from birth and conception to older drinkers and end of life care.

You can submit your research directly to the journal, or if you would like to discuss your ideas please email [email protected].

You may choose our Joint Special Issue in Healthcare.

Dr. John H. Foster
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • alcohol
  • drugs
  • illicit
  • prescription
  • treatment
  • qualitative
  • quantitative
  • mixed methods
  • interdisciplinary
  • lifecourse

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 656 KiB  
Article
Associations between Drug Use and Sexual Risk Behaviours among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Japan: Results from the Cross-Sectional LASH Study
by Takeshi Miwa, Masazumi Yamaguchi, Tomoko Ohtsuki, Gaku Oshima, Chihiro Wakabayashi, Sachiko Nosaka, Kanna Hayashi, Yuzuru Ikushima and Masayoshi Tarui
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(13), 6275; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20136275 - 2 Jul 2023
Viewed by 1585
Abstract
This study assessed drug use patterns among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Japan, and evaluated their potential associations with sexual risk behaviours. Between September and October 2016, study subjects were recruited through a cross-sectional survey (LASH: Love Life and Sexual [...] Read more.
This study assessed drug use patterns among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Japan, and evaluated their potential associations with sexual risk behaviours. Between September and October 2016, study subjects were recruited through a cross-sectional survey (LASH: Love Life and Sexual Health) using a geosocial networking application for MSM. Of the participants, 25.4% (1756/6921) reported ever having used drugs, and 11.3% (780/6921) reported having done so in the past six months. Those who used drugs were more likely to have greater knowledge of HIV/sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Drug use in the past six months was independently associated with each of the following sexual risk behaviours in the same period: (i) six or more sexual partners (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 2.70, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.30–3.17); (ii) condomless anal intercourse (aOR = 2.88, 95% CI: 2.43–3.42); (iii) group sex (aOR = 2.60, 95% CI: 2.22–3.05); and (iv) sex work (aOR = 2.30, 95% CI: 1.67–3.16). These results suggest that MSM in Japan who use drugs are more likely to report sexual risk behaviours, while also having greater knowledge of HIV/STIs. Supporting MSM to minimise the harm from drug use may be helpful in reducing HIV transmission among this priority population. Full article
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11 pages, 850 KiB  
Article
A Pilot Study on the Association of Lead, 8-Hydroxyguanine, and Malondialdehyde Levels in Opium Addicts’ Blood Serum with Illicit Drug Use and Non-Addict Persons
by Farzaneh Allahdinian Hesaruiyeh, Saeed Rajabi, Mohadeseh Motamed-Jahromi, Mohammad Sarhadi, Michelle L. Bell, Razieh Khaksefidi, Somayeh Sarhadi, Leili Mohammadi, Kamal Dua, Amin Mohammadpour and Paolo Martelletti
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(15), 9110; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19159110 - 26 Jul 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1780
Abstract
While a large body of literature has shown the health problems of illicit drug use, research is needed on how substance abuse impacts DNA damage and contaminants in blood, especially given Pb-contaminated opium. This pilot study aimed to evaluate the levels of lead [...] Read more.
While a large body of literature has shown the health problems of illicit drug use, research is needed on how substance abuse impacts DNA damage and contaminants in blood, especially given Pb-contaminated opium. This pilot study aimed to evaluate the levels of lead (Pb), 8-hydroxy di-guanine (8-oxo-Gua), and malondialdehyde (MDA) in the blood serum of opium addicts and non-addict people. The current study is a case–control study with a cross-sectional design. A sample of 50 opium-addicted and non-addict adults were chosen for this study using convenience and random sampling methods. Participants were divided into two groups: addicts and non-addicts. The atomic absorption spectroscopy method was used to measure the quantity of Pb, and the Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) method was used to measure the amount of 8-oxo-Gua and MDA. The data were analyzed using an independent t-test. The results show that the amount of Pb in the blood serum of addicted women and men was higher than levels in non-addict men and women, for the study participants (p-value = 0.001). Blood levels were not significantly different between addicts and non-addicts for men or women for 8-oxo-Gua (p-value = 0.647 for women and p-value = 0.785 for men) and MDA (p-value = 0.867 for women and p-value = 0.995 for men). In general, addicts’ blood Pb levels were found to be substantially higher than those of normal non-addict persons in this pilot study. As a result, testing for blood Pb levels in addicts may be informative in instances when symptoms are inconclusive. Full article
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12 pages, 729 KiB  
Article
How Anti-Substance Abuse Campaigns Influence Substance Abusers’ Psychological Health in Chinese Communities: The Mediating Role of Perceived Stigma
by Yonghui Zeng, Li Han, Yu Cheng and Cindy Xinshan Jia
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(11), 6687; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19116687 - 30 May 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2016
Abstract
The current study explored how anti-substance abuse campaigns influence substance abusers’ psychological health through the perception of stigma. The study is based on a sample of substance abusers who received community-based treatments (n = 3457) and used structural equation modeling to estimate [...] Read more.
The current study explored how anti-substance abuse campaigns influence substance abusers’ psychological health through the perception of stigma. The study is based on a sample of substance abusers who received community-based treatments (n = 3457) and used structural equation modeling to estimate the role of perceived stigma in mediating between perceptions of overstatement of harm conveyed in anti-substance abuse campaigns and psychological outcomes. The results revealed that substance abusers’ perception of overstatement of the harm caused by the substances and substance abusers enhanced their perceived stigma and impaired their psychological health in terms of anxiety, depression, and somatization, through both direct and indirect pathways. The results advocate for proper strategies in the design of anti-substance abuse campaigns. Possible initiatives to reduce substance abusers’ perceived stigma are recommended. Full article
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