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Special Issue "Decontamination of Water and Wastewater via Advanced Oxidation Processes"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Science and Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2022) | Viewed by 2307

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. José A. Peres
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, Chemistry Research Centre – Vila Real, University of Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro, UTAD, Quinta de Prados, 5000-801 Vila Real, Portugal
Interests: environmental engineering; wastewater treatment; advanced oxidation processes
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Marco S. Lucas
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Vila Real Chemistry Center, University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro, UTAD, Quinta de Prados, 5000-801 Vila Real, Portugal
Interests: advanced oxidation processes; biological treatments; environmental chemistry; emerging chemical contaminants; inactivation of pathogens; water reuse and circular economy
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Joaquín R. Dominguez
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Chemical Engineering and Chemical Physics Department, Universidad de Extremadura, Av. Elvas s/n, 06006 Badajoz, Spain
2. Instituto Universitario de Investigación del Agua, Cambio climático y Sostenibilidad (IACYS), Avda de la Investigación s/n, 06006 Badajoz, Spain
Interests: advanced oxidation processes; electrochemical oxidation; sonochemical oxidation; emerging chemical contaminants; inactivation of pathogens
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) can be generally applied for the decontamination of water and wastewater. They are important in the effective removal of emerging contaminants, such as pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) and other priority pollutants. AOPs can transform toxic biorecalcitrant compounds and recalcitrant wastewaters into more biodegradable byproducts. AOPs may possibly include photocatalysis (using solar radiation, LEDs), Fenton-based processes, electrochemical processes, wet air and catalytic wet peroxide oxidation and combinations with biological and membrane processes. The integration of AOPs with more established processes such as ozonation, filtration, adsorption and using renewable energy sources such as solar light can provide a major opportunity to reduce the overall effort of disinfection, water and wastewater treatment processes.

Within this context, we would like to invite you to contribute to this issue and to disseminate cutting-edge findings on water and wastewater decontamination.

Prof. Dr. José A. Peres
Dr. Marco S. Lucas
Prof. Dr. Joaquin R. Dominguez
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • advanced oxidation processes
  • water disinfection
  • industrial wastewater treatment
  • emerging contaminants
  • persistent organic pollutants
  • fenton-based processes
  • heterogeneous photocatalysis
  • activated persulfate
  • water reuse
  • wastewater detoxification
  • electrochemical oxidation

  • sonochemical oxidation

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Ti/PbO2 Electrode Efficiency in Catalytic Chloramphenicol Degradation and Its Effect on Antibiotic Resistance Genes
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(23), 15632; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192315632 - 24 Nov 2022
Viewed by 297
Abstract
Livestock farming has led to the rapid accumulation of antibiotic resistance genes in the environment. Chloramphenicol (CAP) was chosen as a model compound to investigate its degradation during electrochemical treatment. Ti/PbO2 electrodes were prepared using electrodeposition. The prepared Ti/PbO2-La electrodes [...] Read more.
Livestock farming has led to the rapid accumulation of antibiotic resistance genes in the environment. Chloramphenicol (CAP) was chosen as a model compound to investigate its degradation during electrochemical treatment. Ti/PbO2 electrodes were prepared using electrodeposition. The prepared Ti/PbO2-La electrodes had a denser surface and a more complete PbO2 crystal structure. Ti/PbO2-Co electrodes exhibited improved electrochemical catalytic activity and lifetime in practice. The impact of different conditions on the effectiveness of CAP electrochemical degradation was investigated, and the most favorable conditions were identified (current density: I = 15.0 mA/cm, electrolyte concentration: c = 0.125 mol/L, solution pH = 5). Most importantly, we investigated the effects of the different stages of treatment with CAP solutions on the abundance of resistance genes in natural river substrates (intI1, cmlA, cmle3, and cata2). When CAP was completely degraded (100% TOC removal), no effect on resistance gene abundance was observed in the river substrate; incomplete CAP degradation significantly increased the absolute abundance of resistance genes. This suggests that when treating solutions with antibiotics, they must be completely degraded (100% TOC removal) before discharge into the environment to reduce secondary pollution. This study provides insights into the deep treatment of wastewater containing antibiotics and assesses the environmental impact of the resulting treated wastewater. Full article
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Article
Vis LED Photo-Fenton Degradation of 124-Trichlorobenzene at a Neutral pH Using Ferrioxalate as Catalyst
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(15), 9733; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19159733 - 07 Aug 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 738
Abstract
Chlorinated organic compounds (COCs) are among the more toxic organic compounds frequently found in soil and groundwater. Among these, toxic and low-degradable chlorobenzenes are commonly found in the environment. In this work, an innovative process using hydrogen peroxide as the oxidant, ferrioxalate as [...] Read more.
Chlorinated organic compounds (COCs) are among the more toxic organic compounds frequently found in soil and groundwater. Among these, toxic and low-degradable chlorobenzenes are commonly found in the environment. In this work, an innovative process using hydrogen peroxide as the oxidant, ferrioxalate as the catalyst and a visible light-emitting diode lamp (Vis LED) were applied to successfully oxidize 124-trichlorobenzene (124-TCB) in a saturated aqueous solution of 124-TCB (28 mg L−1) at a neutral pH. The influence of a hydrogen peroxide (HP) concentration (61.5–612 mg L−1), Fe3+ (Fe) dosage (3–10 mg L−1), and irradiation level (Rad) (I = 0.12 W cm−2 and I = 0.18 W cm−2) on 124-TCB conversion and dechlorination was studied. A D–Optimal experimental design combined with response surface methodology (RSM) was implemented to maximize the quality of the information obtained. The ANOVA test was used to assess the significance of the model and its coefficients. The maximum pollutant conversion at 180 min (98.50%) was obtained with Fe = 7 mg L−1, HP = 305 mg L−1, and I = 0.12 W cm−2. The effect of two inorganic anions usually presents in real groundwater (bicarbonate and chloride, 600 mg L−1 each) was investigated under those optimized operating conditions. A slight reduction in the 124-TCB conversion after 180 min of reaction was noticed in the presence of bicarbonate (8.31%) and chloride (7.85%). Toxicity was studied with Microtox® (Azur Environmental, Carlsbad, CA, USA) bioassay, and a remarkable toxicity decrease was found in the treated samples, with the inhibition proportional to the remaining 124-TCB concentration. That means that nontoxic byproducts are produced in agreement with the high dechlorination degrees noticed. Full article
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Communication
Laccase–TEMPO as an Efficient System for Doxorubicin Removal from Wastewaters
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(11), 6645; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19116645 - 29 May 2022
Viewed by 693
Abstract
A large number of drugs are used to treat different diseases, and thus to improve the quality of life for humans. These represent a real ecological threat, as they end up in soil or ground waters in amounts that can affect the environment. [...] Read more.
A large number of drugs are used to treat different diseases, and thus to improve the quality of life for humans. These represent a real ecological threat, as they end up in soil or ground waters in amounts that can affect the environment. Among these drugs, doxorubicin is a highly cytotoxic compound used as anticancer medicine. Doxorubicin can be efficiently removed from wastewater or polluted water using a simple enzymatic (biocatalytic) system, employing the oxidoreductase enzyme laccase and a stable organic nitroxide-free radical, TEMPO. Results presented in this work (as percentage of removal) were obtained at pH 5 and 7, after 2, 4, 6, and 24 h, using different ratios between doxorubicin, laccase, and TEMPO. It was shown that longer time, as well as an increased amount of catalyst, led to a higher percentage of removal, up to 100%. The influence of all these parameters is also discussed. In this way it was shown that the laccase–TEMPO biocatalytic system is highly efficient in the removal of the anticancer drug doxorubicin from wastewaters. Full article
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