Special Issue "Training Methods to Improve Sports Performance and Health"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Exercise and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Bruno Gonçalves
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Leading Guest Editor
Departamento de Desporto e Saúde, Escola de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade de Évora, Évora, PortugalComprehensive Health Research Centre (CHRC), Universidade de Évora, Évora, Portugal
Interests: Sports science, sport performance, sport training, elite sport, physical education, complex system, collective behaviour
Dr. Hugo Folgado
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Assistant Guest Editor
Departamento de Desporto e Saúde, Escola de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade de Évora, Évora, PortugalComprehensive Health Research Centre (CHRC), Universidade de Évora, Évora, Portugal
Interests: Sports science, sport performance, sport training, elite sport, physical education, complex system, collective behaviour.
Dr. Jorge Bravo
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Assistant Guest Editor
Departamento de Desporto e Saúde, Escola de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade de Évora, Évora, PortugalComprehensive Health Research Centre (CHRC), Universidade de Évora, Évora, Portugal
Interests: Sports science, exercise physiology, sport health, body composition, geriatrics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

There are several types of training methods aiming to develop sport performance and improve health indicators. Fundamentally, training methods are the result of manipulating different training variables, and the possibility of combining these variables is vast. Therefore, the search to study the effect of these constraints on sports and health, considering specific contexts and taking into account the magnitude of inter-individual responses, will afford a better understanding of the training interventions.

At the same time, over the years, numerous innovations and technological advances have been introduced to assist the development of athletes’ performance and monitor individual lifestyles. These advances have changed how the training may be conducted, controlled, and evaluated. For example, in sport settings, using technology to collect intense and continuous data of athletes’ activity in their natural environments appears as an innovative and promising step. In health, the enormous diversity of training methods supporting healthy lifestyles and innovative approaches is arising, especially but not only from improved information gathered through technological development.

Papers addressing these topics are invited for this Special Issue, especially those combining a high academic standard with a practical focus on providing knowledge on how training methods improve sport performance and health across the lifespan. Evidence updates urge us to track the progress and effects of training methods.

Dr. Bruno Gonçalves
Dr. Hugo Folgado
Dr. Jorge Bravo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sport performance
  • health
  • exercise
  • technology
  • training environment
  • manipulations

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
The Effect of Eight-Week Sprint Interval Training on Aerobic Performance of Elite Badminton Players
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(2), 638; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18020638 - 13 Jan 2021
Abstract
This study was aimed to: (1) investigate the effects of physiological functions of sprint interval training (SIT) on the aerobic capacity of elite badminton players; and (2) explore the potential mechanisms of oxygen uptake, transport and recovery within the process. Thirty-two elite badminton [...] Read more.
This study was aimed to: (1) investigate the effects of physiological functions of sprint interval training (SIT) on the aerobic capacity of elite badminton players; and (2) explore the potential mechanisms of oxygen uptake, transport and recovery within the process. Thirty-two elite badminton players volunteered to participate and were randomly divided into experimental (Male-SIT and Female-SIT group) and control groups (Male-CON and Female-CON) within each gender. During a total of eight weeks, SIT group performed three times of SIT training per week, including two power bike trainings and one multi-ball training, while the CON group undertook two Fartlek runs and one regular multi-ball training. The distance of YO-YO IR2 test (which evaluates player’s ability to recover between high intensity intermittent exercises) for Male-SIT and Female-SIT groups increased from 1083.0 ± 205.8 m to 1217.5 ± 190.5 m, and from 725 ± 132.9 m to 840 ± 126.5 m (p < 0.05), respectively, which were significantly higher than both CON groups (p < 0.05). For the Male-SIT group, the ventilatory anaerobic threshold and ventilatory anaerobic threshold in percentage of VO2max significantly increased from 3088.4 ± 450.9 mL/min to 3665.3 ± 263.5 mL/min (p < 0.05),and from 74 ± 10% to 85 ± 3% (p < 0.05) after the intervention, and the increases were significantly higher than the Male-CON group (p < 0.05); for the Female-SIT group, the ventilatory anaerobic threshold and ventilatory anaerobic threshold in percentage of VO2max were significantly elevated from 1940.1 ± 112.8 mL/min to 2176.9 ± 78.6 mL/min, and from 75 ± 4% to 82 ± 4% (p < 0.05) after the intervention, which also were significantly higher than those of the Female-CON group (p < 0.05). Finally, the lactate clearance rate was raised from 13 ± 3% to 21 ± 4% (p < 0.05) and from 21 ± 5% to 27 ± 4% for both Male-SIT and Female-SIT groups when compared to the pre-test, and this increase was significantly higher than the control groups (p < 0.05). As a training method, SIT could substantially improve maximum aerobic capacity and aerobic recovery ability by improving the oxygen uptake and delivery, thus enhancing their rapid repeated sprinting ability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Training Methods to Improve Sports Performance and Health)
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