Special Issue "The Implications of the Social Determinants of Health for Quality of Life, and Wellbeing"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Ann Hemingway
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Guest Editor
Professor of Public Health, Department of Medical Sciences and Public Health, Bournemouth University, Bournemouth House B129, 19 Christchurch Road, Bournemouth, BH1 3LH, UK
Interests: public health; ageing; applied/experimental psychology; lifestyles and identities; older people; work place health
Dr. Vanessa Heaslip
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Assistant Guest Editor
Department of Nursing Science, Bournemouth University, Bournemouth House B129, 19 Christchurch Road, Bournemouth, BH1 3LH, UK
Interests: well-being; marginalized groups; health access; Gypsy Roma Travellers; mental health; equality and diversity
Dr. Folashade Tawakalitu Alloh
Website
Assistant Guest Editor
Department of Health and nursing, University of East London, Stratford Campus, Water Lane, London, E15 4LZ, UK
Interests: public health; minority; lifestyle; immigrant; non-communicable diseases; inequality

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues

Inequalities in health are the differences in the prevalence or incidence of health problems between people of higher and lower socio-economic status. The research evidence internationally tells us overwhelmingly that the lower an individual’s socio-economic position, the higher their risk of poor health. Inequities in health consist of these differences, but understood as being preventable and therefore unjust and wrong. Whatever is different about the lived experience of people across income groups has a profound effect on their risks of physical and mental illness and early death. The experiences we have as humans are greatly influenced by the conditions within which we are born, grow, work (play), live (love) and age and by the inequities in power, money and resources that influence these conditions of daily life, the social determinants of health (Marmot 2015).

It would appear that if one looks closely at income inequality research, the most likely explanation is that it is what individuals are able to ‘‘be’’ and ‘‘do’’ at each level of our social hierarchy that produces the gradient in ill health, particularly in relation to empowerment or disempowerment, rather than the simple fact of their being in possession of different amounts of income once basic needs are met (Sen, 2002, Marmot 2015).

Papers that combine methodological robustness, that further our understanding of human wellbeing and quality of life and how these are influenced by the social determinants of health, are encouraged.

Prof. Ann Hemingway
Dr. Folashade Tawakalitu Alloh
Dr. Vanessa Heaslip
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • inequalities
  • inequities
  • health
  • wellbeing
  • quality of life
  • social determinants

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Maternal Socioeconomic Factors and Racial/Ethnic Differences in Neonatal Anthropometry
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(19), 7323; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17197323 - 07 Oct 2020
Abstract
Disparities in birthweight by maternal race/ethnicity are commonly observed. It is unclear to what extent these disparities are correlates of individual socioeconomic factors. In a prospective cohort of 1645 low-risk singleton pregnancies included in the NICHD Fetal Growth Study (2009–2013), neonatal anthropometry was [...] Read more.
Disparities in birthweight by maternal race/ethnicity are commonly observed. It is unclear to what extent these disparities are correlates of individual socioeconomic factors. In a prospective cohort of 1645 low-risk singleton pregnancies included in the NICHD Fetal Growth Study (2009–2013), neonatal anthropometry was measured by trained personnel using a standard protocol. Socioeconomic characteristics included employment status, marital status, health insurance, annual income, and education. Separate adjusted generalized linear models were fit to both test the effect of race/ethnicity and the interaction of race/ethnicity and socioeconomic characteristics on neonatal anthropometry. Mean infant birthweight, length, head circumference, and abdominal circumference all differed by race/ethnicity (p < 0.001). We observed no statistically significant interactions between race/ethnicity and full-time employment/student status, marital status, insurance, or education in association with birthweight, neonatal exam weight, length, or head or abdominal circumference at examination. The interaction between income and race/ethnicity was significant only for abdominal circumference (p = 0.027), with no other significant interactions for other growth parameters, suggesting that racial/ethnic differences in neonatal anthropometry did not vary by individual socioeconomic factors in low-risk women. Our results do not preclude structural factors, such as lifetime exposure to poverty, as an explanation for racial/ethnic disparities. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
The Relationship between Just World Beliefs and Life Satisfaction
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(17), 6410; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176410 - 03 Sep 2020
Abstract
An important and often unexplored factor shaping life satisfaction is one’s perception of the world as a “just” place. The “just world hypothesis” is predicated on the idea that the world works as a place where people get what they merit, an idea [...] Read more.
An important and often unexplored factor shaping life satisfaction is one’s perception of the world as a “just” place. The “just world hypothesis” is predicated on the idea that the world works as a place where people get what they merit, an idea that often serves as a means for people to rationalize injustices. The research addressing just world beliefs has expanded into a four-factor model that categorizes just world beliefs for self and others into subcategories of distributive and procedural justice. Distributive justice involves evaluations of the fairness of outcomes, allocations, or distribution of resources, while procedural concerns evaluations of the fairness of decision processes, rules, or interpersonal treatment. This study explored the relationship between the four just world beliefs subscales and overall satisfaction with life and examined their associations with demographic variables including ethnicity, age, gender, religion, and social class. The relationships of demographic factors with justice beliefs and life satisfaction generally yielded very small effect sizes. However, respondents who identified themselves as middle and upper class reported higher levels of life satisfaction than those who identified themselves as lower class, with a medium effect size. Consistent with the results of earlier research, regressing life satisfaction on the four justice beliefs subscales indicated that the two self-subscales (distributive and procedural) were significantly predictive of life satisfaction, but the two other subscales (distributive and procedural) were not. Full article
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