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Special Issue "Editorial Board Members' Collection Series: Environmental Ecology and Management"

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Chi Peng
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Metallurgy and Environment, Central South University, Changsha 410083, China
Interests: trace metals; risk assessment; soil contamination
Prof. Dr. Hui Wang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Water Conservancy and Environment, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022, China
Interests: soil ecology; environmental effects of emerging pollutants
Prof. Dr. Jinyan Zhan
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 10875, China
Interests: LUCC; ecosystem service; urban management
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Xianlai Zeng
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China
Interests: urban mining; resource evaluation; E-waste management; circular economy
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Liancong Luo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute for Ecological Research and Pollution Control of Plateau Lakes, School of Ecology and Environmental Science, Yunnan University, Kunming 650504, China
Interests: algal bloom; water quality; extreme weather; lakes; climate change

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to announce this Collection titled “Editorial Board Members' Collection Series: Environmental Ecology and Management”. It will be a collection of papers from researchers invited by the Editorial Board Members. The aim is to provide a venue for networking and communication between IJERPH and scholars in the field of environmental ecology and management. All papers will be published with fully open access after peer review.

Dr. Chi Peng
Prof. Dr. Hui Wang
Prof. Dr. Jinyan Zhan
Dr. Xianlai Zeng
Dr. Liancong Luo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • pollution ecology
  • soil pollution
  • environmental models
  • risk assessment and prediction
  • ecosystem services
  • restoration of terrestrial ecosystems
  • sustainability
  • regional development
  • climate change
  • pollution effect
  • heavy metal
  • emerging pollutants
  • global change
  • soil microbia
  • nitrogen deposition
  • human disturbance
  • water ecology
  • biological response
  • human being health

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Article
Spatial and Temporal Variation and Prediction of Ecosystem Carbon Stocks in Yunnan Province Based on Land Use Change
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(23), 16059; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192316059 - 30 Nov 2022
Viewed by 198
Abstract
The function of ecosystems as carbon sinks has emerged as a key strategy for advancing the concept of “carbon neutrality” and “carbon peaking”. Ecosystem carbon stocks are impacted by land use changes that alter ecosystem structure and function. We evaluated the ecosystem carbon [...] Read more.
The function of ecosystems as carbon sinks has emerged as a key strategy for advancing the concept of “carbon neutrality” and “carbon peaking”. Ecosystem carbon stocks are impacted by land use changes that alter ecosystem structure and function. We evaluated the ecosystem carbon stocks of Yunnan Province in different periods with the aid of the carbon stock module of the InVEST model, analyzed the relationship between land use type shift and ecosystem carbon stock changes, and combine them with the CA-Markov model to predict land use types in 2030. The results showed that between 1990 and 2020, changes in land use primarily affected cropland, grassland, and forested areas. The ecosystem’s average carbon stock from 1990 to 2020 was 8278.97 × 106 t. The carbon stocks of cropland, grassland, and unused land decreased by 31.36 × 106 t, 32.18 × 106 t, and 4.18 × 106 t during 1990–2020, respectively, while the carbon stocks of forest land, water area, and construction land increased by 24.31 × 106 t, 7.34 × 106 t, and 22.08 × 106 t. The main cause of the increase in carbon stocks in the ecosystem in Yunnan Province throughout the process of land use type shift was the development of forest land area, whereas the main cause of the decline was the shrinkage of cropland and grassland areas. Full article
Article
Ecological Sustainability and Households’ Wellbeing: Linking Households’ Non-Traditional Fuel Choices with Reduced Depression in Rural China
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(23), 15639; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192315639 - 24 Nov 2022
Viewed by 331
Abstract
A sustainable and pleasant environment is deemed to offer various positive externalities such as scenic, visual and behavioral archetypes and patterns exhibiting in various forms. Such a scenario can significantly relieve households from many psychological and personal complications such as depression. Depression has [...] Read more.
A sustainable and pleasant environment is deemed to offer various positive externalities such as scenic, visual and behavioral archetypes and patterns exhibiting in various forms. Such a scenario can significantly relieve households from many psychological and personal complications such as depression. Depression has aroused great concerns in recent years due to its personal and social burdens and unforeseeable damage. Many studies have explored the effects of air pollution caused by traditional fuel consumption on depression. However, limited evidence is available on how household non-traditional fuel choices affect depression. Based on a nationally representative dataset collected from China Family Panel Studies (CFPS) in 2012, this paper employs an endogenous switching regression (ESR) model and an endogenous switching probit (ESP) model to address the endogenous issue and to estimate the treatment effects of non-traditional fuel choices on depression in rural China. The empirical results show that non-traditional fuel users have significantly lower Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) scores, indicating non-traditional fuel users face a lower risk of depression. Compared to solid fuels, employing non-traditional fuels will lead to a 3.659 reduction in depression score or decrease the probability of depression by 8.2%. In addition, the results of the mechanism analysis show that household non-traditional fuel choices affect depression by reducing the probability of physical discomfort and chronic disease. This study provides new insight into understanding the impact of air pollution in the house on depression and how to avoid the risk of depression in rural China effectively. Full article
Article
Urbanization Impact on Regional Sustainable Development: Through the Lens of Urban-Rural Resilience
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(22), 15407; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192215407 - 21 Nov 2022
Viewed by 392
Abstract
The urban–rural system is an economically, socially, and environmentally interlinked space, which requires the integration of industry, space, and population. To achieve sustainable and coordinated development between urban and rural systems, dynamic land use change within the urban–rural system and the ecological and [...] Read more.
The urban–rural system is an economically, socially, and environmentally interlinked space, which requires the integration of industry, space, and population. To achieve sustainable and coordinated development between urban and rural systems, dynamic land use change within the urban–rural system and the ecological and social consequences need to be clarified. This study uses system resilience to evaluate such an impact and explores the impact of land use change, especially land conversion induced by urbanization on regional development through the lens of urban–rural resilience. The empirical case is based on the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei Urban Agglomeration (BTHUA) in China from 2000 to 2020 when there was rapid urbanization in this region. The results show that along with urbanization in the BTHUA, urban–rural resilience is high in urban core areas and low in peripheral areas. From the urban core to the rural outskirts, there is a general trend that comprehensive resilience decreases with decreased social resilience and increased ecological resilience in this region. Specifically, at the city level, comprehensive resilience decreases sharply from the urban center to its 3–5 km buffer zone and then remains relatively stable in the rural regions. A similar trend goes for social resilience at the city level, while ecological resilience increases sharply from the urban center to its 1–3 km buffer zone, and then remains relatively stable in the rural regions in this region, except for cities in the west and south of Hebei. This study contributes to the conceptualization and measurement of urban–rural resilience in the urban–rural system with empirical findings revealing the impact of rapid urbanization on urban–rural resilience over the last twenty years in the BTHUA in China. In addition, the spatial heterogeneity results could be used for policy reference to make targeted resilience strategies in the study region. Full article
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Article
Trade and Embodied CO2 Emissions: Analysis from a Global Input–Output Perspective
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(21), 14605; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192114605 - 07 Nov 2022
Viewed by 594
Abstract
Global trade drives the world’s economic development, while a large amount of embodied carbon is transferred among different countries and regions. Based on a multi-regional input–output model, the trade embodied carbon transfers of bilateral trade between 185 countries/regions around the world were calculated. [...] Read more.
Global trade drives the world’s economic development, while a large amount of embodied carbon is transferred among different countries and regions. Based on a multi-regional input–output model, the trade embodied carbon transfers of bilateral trade between 185 countries/regions around the world were calculated. On the basis, regional trade embodied carbon transfer patterns and major national trade patterns in six continents, eight major economic cooperation organizations, and six representative countries/regions were further analyzed. The results showed that Europe was the continent with the largest embodied carbon inflows from trade and Africa was the continent with the largest embodied carbon outflows from trade. China was the country which had the largest embodied carbon outflows from trade, while the United States, France, Japan, and Germany were countries which had embodied carbon inflows from trade. OECD, EU, and NAFTA were the economic cooperation organizations with embodied carbon inflows from trade, while BRICS, SCO, RCEP, OPEC, and ASEAN were economic cooperation organizations with embodied carbon outflows from trade. Developed countries such as the United States, France, and the United Kingdom protected their environment by exporting high-value products and importing low-value and carbon-intensive products. Developing countries such as China and Russia earned foreign exchange by exporting carbon-intensive and commodity products at a huge environmental cost. In contrast, Germany, China, and Russia played different roles in the global industrial chain, while Germany exchanged more trade surpluses at lower environmental costs. Therefore, for different countries and regions, their own industries should be actively upgraded to adjust the import and export structure, the cooperation and coordination in all regions of the world should be strengthened, and the transfers of embodied carbon needs to be reduced to make the trade model sustainable. Full article
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Article
Food, Energy, and Water Nexus at Household Level: Do Sustainable Household Consumption Practices Promote Cleaner Environment?
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(19), 12945; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph191912945 - 10 Oct 2022
Viewed by 657
Abstract
Governments around the globe are trying to find sustainable solutions for lessening pressure on natural resources and reducing carbon emissions. Daily household consumption of food, energy, and water has an impact on stocks of natural resources, environmental quality, and climate change. Households have [...] Read more.
Governments around the globe are trying to find sustainable solutions for lessening pressure on natural resources and reducing carbon emissions. Daily household consumption of food, energy, and water has an impact on stocks of natural resources, environmental quality, and climate change. Households have significant potential for increasing conservation actions for efficient use of natural resources and greenhouse gas emissions. Households could contribute to a clean and healthy environment by adopting sustainable household practices through lower per capita consumption and carbon emissions. This study explored the role of different sustainable household consumption practices in promoting a clean environment as well as the factors affecting the adoption of these practices in Pakistan. Factor analysis and an ordered probit model were used to analyze the data from 1424 participants chosen through a multistage random sampling technique. The factor analysis identified 35 sustainable household practices for sustainable consumption. These 35 practices were grouped into the underlying factors of “Food” (14 items), “Energy” (12 items), and “Water” (9 items). The results from the econometric model showed a significant relationship between gender, education, residential area, family size, and income and the adoption of sustainable household consumption practices. Statistically, higher levels of reported sustainable consumption practices were apparent among females, households living in urban areas, more educated people, individuals of large family sizes, and more affluent households. Therefore, public policies for taking care of the environment need to put households at the center while at the same time promoting mass uptake of sustainable consumption practices related to food, energy, and water. In addition, the sector-specific policies also need to be augmented through focus on household-level consumption and production dynamics for achieving the UN’s SDGs. Full article
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