Special Issue "Cardiovascular Neural Regulation in Adults from Daily Life to Occupational Environment"

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Franca Barbic
Website
Guest Editor
1. Internal Medicine, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center- IRCCS, 20089 Rozzano, Milan, Italy
2. Department of Biomedical Sciences, Humanitas University, 20090 Pieve Emanuele, Milan, Italy
Interests: cardiovascular autonomic disorders; occupational medicine; shift-work; syncope; orthostatic intolerance; orthostatic hypotension
Prof. Dr. Antonio Roberto Zamuner
Website
Guest Editor
Departamento de Kinesiología, Universidad Católica del Maule (UCM), Talca, Chile
Interests: cardiovascular autonomic disorders; baroreflex; cardiovascular rehabilitation; physical therapy; exercise
Prof. Dr. Eleonora Tobaldini
Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Internal Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy
2. Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, University of Milan, Italy
Interests: cardiovascular autonomic regulation; heart rate variability; sleep; vagal stimulation
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As a link between the central nervous system and the body viscera, the autonomic nervous system guarantees an adequate response to different environmental stimuli, in healthy adults. Cardiovascular neural regulation is a crucial component of this complex model, particularly in the presence of physical and psychological stress, in response to physical and chemical agents including pollutants, in different environmental microclimates, during orthostatic stress and in response to circadian rhythms alteration as happens, for example, during irregular work schedules.

The neural control of circulation involves baroreceptors and vagal nerves that connect the bulbar structures to the heart and sympathetic nerves that project to the spinal cord. Both nerve pathways contain afferent and efferent fibers. Bulbar and spinal nuclei are under the final control of supra-spinal and cortical structures.

The alteration of this complex network may significantly impact the human capability to adapt itself to different environmental stimuli including those characterizing different occupational settings and tasks. This may reduce human performances, promote diseases, increase the risk of accidents, and negatively impact public health.

In this Special Issue, the mechanisms of cardiovascular neural regulation in adults will be addressed in health and disease, with a special emphasis on its role in adaptation to environmental daily stimuli.

Prof. Dr. Franca Barbic
Prof. Dr. Roberto Antonio Zamuner
Prof. Dr. Eleonora Tobaldini
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Working environments
  • Shift-work
  • Heart rate and blood pressure variabilities
  • Baroreceptor control
  • Physical and psychological stress
  • Syncope
  • Orthostatic hypotension
  • Hypertension
  • Cognitive performance
  • Fibromyalgia

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Association between Cardiac Autonomic Control and Postural Control in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(1), 249; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010249 - 31 Dec 2020
Abstract
Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that affects postural and cardiac autonomic control. However, since it is unknown whether these changes are associated, the objective of this study was to determine whether such a relationship exists. Twenty-three patients with PD participated. The [...] Read more.
Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that affects postural and cardiac autonomic control. However, since it is unknown whether these changes are associated, the objective of this study was to determine whether such a relationship exists. Twenty-three patients with PD participated. The RR intervals were recorded in different positions and heart rate variability (HRV) was analyzed. Postural sway was analyzed based on the center of pressure. No significant differences on HRV indices were induced by postural change. A correlation was found between these indices and postural control, high frequency (HF), and anterior-posterior (AP) root mean square (RMS-AP) (r = 0.422, p = 0.045), low frequency (LF)/HF, and AP mean velocity (r = 0.478, p = 0.021). A correlation was found between HRV induced by postural change and postural control, Δ LF/HF and RMS-AP (r = 0.448, p = 0.032), Δ LF/HF and ellipse area (r = 0.505, p = 0.014), Δ LF/HF and AP mean velocity (r = −0.531; p = 0.009), and Δ LF and AP mean velocity (r = −0.424, p = 0.044). There is an association between the autonomic and postural systems, such that PD patients with blunted cardiac autonomic function in both the supine and orthostatic positions have worse postural control. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Effects of Cigarette Smoking on Cardiac Autonomic Responses: A Cross-Sectional Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(22), 8571; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17228571 - 19 Nov 2020
Abstract
It has been suggested that some of the adverse, long-term cardiovascular outcomes of smoking are mediated by impaired autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity. Yet, this association is currently inconclusive. Heart rate variability (HRV) and the deep breathing test (DBT) represent common quantitative markers [...] Read more.
It has been suggested that some of the adverse, long-term cardiovascular outcomes of smoking are mediated by impaired autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity. Yet, this association is currently inconclusive. Heart rate variability (HRV) and the deep breathing test (DBT) represent common quantitative markers of ANS activity due to their simplicity and reliability. This large cross-sectional study was designed to assess the effect of active smoking on ANS function as manifested by HRV or DBT abnormalities. Electrocardiograms were recorded at rest for 5 min and during forced metronomic breathing. HRV and DBT were calculated according to accepted standards. Participants were divided into two groups based on current smoking status. The study included 242 healthy volunteers (196 nonsmokers and 46 smokers). There were no significant differences in age, sex, and BMI between groups. Cumulative smoking exposure burden (CSEB) for the study group was 5.3 ± 1.3 pack-years. Comparative analysis of HRV and DBT parameters according to smoking status revealed no significant differences between groups. Significant (p < 0.05), yet weak or moderate correlations (r < 0.7) were found between CSEB and abnormal change in HRV parameters consistent with sympathetic overactivity and decreased parasympathetic tone. In conclusion, smoking for a relatively short period in healthy adults does not seem to lead to significant impairment in ANS function. Yet, the consequences of smoking seem to be amplified when cumulative exposure burden increases. Full article
Open AccessArticle
Work Ability Assessment and Its Relationship with Cardiovascular Autonomic Profile in Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(21), 7836; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17217836 - 26 Oct 2020
Abstract
Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) negatively impacts quality of life. The excessive increase in cardiac sympathetic modulation during standing, which characterizes POTS patients, leads to many symptoms and signs of orthostatic intolerance. Little is known about the consequences of the disease on work [...] Read more.
Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) negatively impacts quality of life. The excessive increase in cardiac sympathetic modulation during standing, which characterizes POTS patients, leads to many symptoms and signs of orthostatic intolerance. Little is known about the consequences of the disease on work performance and its relationship with individual autonomic profiles. Twenty-two POTS patients regularly engaged in working activity (20 females, age 36 ± 12 years) and 18 gender- and age-matched controls underwent a clinical evaluation and filled out the Work Ability Index (WAI) questionnaire. POTS patients completed the Composite Autonomic Symptom Score (COMPASS31) questionnaire, underwent continuous electrocardiogram, blood pressure and respiratory activity recordings while supine and during a 75° head-up tilt (HUT). A power spectrum analysis provided the index of cardiac sympatho-vagal balance (LF/HF). WAI scores were significantly reduced in POTS patients (29.84 ± 1.40) compared to controls (45.63 ± 0.53, p < 0.01). A significant inverse correlation was found between individual WAI and COMPASS31 scores (r = −0.46; p = 0.03), HUT increase in heart rate (r = −0.57; p = 0.01) and LF/HF (r = −0.55; p = 0.01). In POTS patients, the WAI scores were inversely correlated to the intensity of autonomic symptoms and to the excessive cardiac sympathetic activation induced by the gravitational stimulus. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Time Course of Autonomic Symptoms in Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS) Patients: Two-Year Follow-Up Results
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(16), 5872; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17165872 - 13 Aug 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is a multifactorial condition capable of chronically reducing the quality of life and the work ability of patients. The study aim was to assess the burden of autonomic symptoms in a cohort of POTS patients over 2 years. [...] Read more.
Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is a multifactorial condition capable of chronically reducing the quality of life and the work ability of patients. The study aim was to assess the burden of autonomic symptoms in a cohort of POTS patients over 2 years. Patients’ clinical profiles were assessed by the 31-item Composite Autonomic Symptom Score questionnaire (COMPASS 31) and a visual analog scale (VAS). One-way ANOVA for repeated measures followed by Dunnett’s post-hoc test were used to compare symptoms at baseline and at 1 and 2 years. Out of 42 enrolled patients, 25 had a 1-year follow-up and 12 had a 2-year follow-up. At baseline, the reported burden of autonomic symptoms was high (overall COMPASS 31 = 49.9 ± 14.3 /100). Main complaints were related to orthostatic intolerance according to both COMPASS 31 and VAS. Fourteen patients were rendered inactive because of symptoms. At 1-year follow-up, a statistically significant improvement in pupillomotor function and overall score was detected by the COMPASS 31. These findings were confirmed at 2 years, together with a significant reduction in quality of life impairment, assessed by VAS. However, these improvements did not change patients’ occupational status. Awareness of POTS diagnosis, patient monitoring, and tailored therapies can help to improve patients’ condition. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop