ijerph-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Health, Social Problems and Well-Being of Patients with Chronic Diseases, Quality of Life, and the Need for Emotional and Social Support

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Infectious Diseases, Chronic Diseases, and Disease Prevention".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 4917

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, 61-701 Poznan, Poland
Interests: care and functioning of patients with chronic diseases and those requiring surgical treatment; assessment of the quality of nursing care in the field of postoperative pain; the assessment of the quality of life of patients with chronic diseases; surgically treated diseases
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The definition of a chronic disease, adopted by the American National Commission on Chronic Illness describes, is as follows: "A chronic disease is defined as a disorder or deviation from the norm with one or more of the following characteristics: a long-term course; their etiology, the course, and treatment are not clearly defined, leave dysfunction or disability after that, require specialist rehabilitation, supervision, observation or care." The most important chronic diseases include cardiovascular diseases, cerebrovascular diseases, chronic respiratory diseases, cancer, diabetes, mental diseases, autoimmune diseases, epilepsy, osteoporosis, obesity, multiple sclerosis, chronic kidney disease, and HIV/AIDS.

The consequences of chronic diseases are complex and concern various spheres of functioning. First, they cause increasing discomfort to the patient's physical and mental state, resulting from experienced pain, suffering, progressive limitation, or loss of function. An important measure of treatment effects and patients' expectations is the "quality of life." According to the WHO (World Health Organization) definition, quality of life is an individual estimation of an individual's perception of their life position about the circle of culture and value system, taking into account its aspirations, desires, interests, and standards.

This Special Issue aims to learn about health, social and emotional problems, assess quality of life, and evaluate the need for social and emotional support for people with chronic diseases.

The presence of a chronic disease not only disturbs the functional, physical, and social aspects of life but also evokes negative emotions. This situation causes a decrease in well-being and disturbs the quality of life in all areas.

Research on these aspects allows us to obtain valuable information from patients. This concerns not only the symptoms of the disease and side effects of the treatment but also the assessment of the psychological (well-being), social and spiritual dimensions. The results of research into these specific issues occurring in people with chronic diseases will help to direct treatment and patient care through evidence-based medicine EBM (evidence-based medicine) and EBNP (evidence-based nursing practice). 

You may choose our Joint Special Issue in Healthcare.

Dr. Grażyna Bączyk
Dr. Dorota Formanowicz
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • chronic diseases
  • health problems
  • health-related quality of life
  • well-being
  • social support
  • emotional support
  • general and specific scales

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

10 pages, 793 KiB  
Article
Public Knowledge and Attitude towards Vitiligo: A Cross-Sectional Survey in Jordan
by Rand Murshidi, Nour Shewaikani, Assem Al Refaei, Balqis Alfreijat, Buthaina Al-Sabri, Mahmoud Abdallat, Muayyad Murshidi, Tala Khamis, Yasmin Al-Dawoud and Zahraa Alattar
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(12), 6183; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20126183 - 19 Jun 2023
Viewed by 2749
Abstract
Background: Vitiligo is an autoimmune disease affecting approximately 2% of the world’s population. Besides vitiligo cosmetic issues, patients suffer from psychological comorbidities. This results from the stigmatization they encounter from surrounding individuals. Accordingly, the current study was the first to assess Jordanians’ knowledge [...] Read more.
Background: Vitiligo is an autoimmune disease affecting approximately 2% of the world’s population. Besides vitiligo cosmetic issues, patients suffer from psychological comorbidities. This results from the stigmatization they encounter from surrounding individuals. Accordingly, the current study was the first to assess Jordanians’ knowledge and attitude toward vitiligo. Methods: Data collection was completed by an online questionnaire consisting of four sections to capture participants’ sociodemographic characteristics, previous exposure, and knowledge and attitude toward vitiligo. The analysis took place through R and RStudio. Results: Of our 994 surveyed participants, only 8.45% and 12.47% had a low level of vitiligo knowledge and negative total attitude score, respectively. Moreover, independent predictors of positive attitudes included younger age (18–30), high school education or lower, hearing about or living with a vitiligo patient, and higher knowledge scores. The highest prevalence of positive attitudes was observed when physicians were the source of knowledge. Conclusion: Some critical misconceptions were identified despite the Jordanian public having sufficient overall knowledge. Furthermore, higher knowledge reflected a higher prevalence of positive attitudes toward the patients. We recommend that future efforts target the public understanding of the nature of the disease and its being non-communicable. Moreover, we emphasize that medical knowledge should be communicated through qualified healthcare providers. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 774 KiB  
Article
Mental Health, Quality of Life, and Stigmatization in Danish Patients with Liver Disease
by Nadja Østberg, Birgitte Gade Jacobsen, Mette Munk Lauridsen and Lea Ladegaard Grønkjær
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(8), 5497; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20085497 - 13 Apr 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1729
Abstract
The mental health of patients with liver diseases is often overlooked when assessing their overall health and planning care and treatment. The aim of this study was to assess anxiety, depression, hopelessness, quality of life, and the perception of stigmatization in a large [...] Read more.
The mental health of patients with liver diseases is often overlooked when assessing their overall health and planning care and treatment. The aim of this study was to assess anxiety, depression, hopelessness, quality of life, and the perception of stigmatization in a large cohort of patients with chronic liver disease of different aetiology and severity, as well as to identify predictors associated with mental health disorders. A total of 340 patients completed a survey assessing mental health using the Beck Anxiety Inventory, the Beck Hopelessness Scale, and the Major Depression Inventory. Quality of life was measured with the Chronic Liver Disease Questionnaire and the European Quality-of-Life visual analogue scale. To assess stigmatization, validated questions from the Danish Nationwide Survey of Patient Experiences were used. Predictors associated with anxiety, hopelessness, and depression were analysed using univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses. Overall, 15% of the patients had moderate or severe anxiety, 3% had moderate or pronounced hopelessness, and 8% had moderate or severe depression. The prevalence of all three was highest in patients with cirrhosis and was associated with a low quality of life. More patients with cirrhosis had perceived stigmatization compared to patients with liver disease without cirrhosis, which affected their self-perception, and more than one-third of the patients refrained from telling others about their liver disease. The results emphasize the need for increased focus on mental health problems and awareness on preventing the discrimination of patients with liver disease. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop