Topical Collection "E-learning and Digital Training in Healthcare Education: Current Trends and New Challenges"

A topical collection in Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032). This collection belongs to the section "TeleHealth and Digital Healthcare".

Editors

Prof. Dr. Luís Proença
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Quantitative Methods for Health Research Unit (MQIS), CiiEM, Egas Moniz -Cooperativa de Ensino Superior, 2829-511 Caparica, Almada, Portugal
Interests: data analysis; biostatistics; public health; epidemiology; research design; clinical research; e-learning
Prof. Dr. José João Mendes
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Clinical Research Unit (CRU), CiiEM, Egas Moniz - Cooperativa de Ensino Superior, 2829-511 Caparica, Almada, Portugal
Interests: dentistry; clinical teaching; innovation in teaching; public health; clinical research
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. João Botelho
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Clinical Research Unit, Centro de Investigação Interdisciplinar Egas Moniz, Egas Moniz – Cooperativa de Ensino Superior, CRL, Almada, Portugal
Interests: periodontal diseases; periodontitis; systemic inflammation; cardiovascular diseases; neurological conditions; metabolic disorders; systematic review; meta-analysis
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Vanessa Machado
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Egas Moniz - Cooperativa de Ensino Superior, Crl, Caparica, Portugal
Interests: periodontitis; periodontal disease; dentistry; epidemiology; public health; inflammation; systemic health; systematic review
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

The COVID-19 pandemic had a massive impact on the learning and teaching processes, especially in healthcare education, due to the predominant role of the current student–patient interaction. Worldwide higher education institutions were forced to accelerate the introduction of web-based learning methodologies in areas where that was not the main core, like clinical teaching. This Special Issue is dedicated to the current trends and new challenges that emerge from this new e-learning environment, focusing on its potential to revolutionize healthcare education and exploring how it may help to better prepare the future healthcare professionals for their daily practice.

The Special Issue “E-learning and Digital Training in Healthcare Education: Current Trends and New Challenges” seeks research articles focusing on new insights into the use of interactive and intuitive e-learning tools and innovative teaching methodologies that engage healthcare students in the new web-based environment training. Case studies of ‘pathfinder’ e-learning initiatives and surveys related to the penetration and acceptance of the digital training in healthcare education are also encouraged.

Prof. Dr. Luís Proença
Prof. Dr. José João Mendes
Dr. João Botelho
Dr. Vanessa Machado
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the collection website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Healthcare is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • e-learning
  • digital training
  • healthcare education
  • innovation in teaching
  • clinical teaching

Published Papers (31 papers)

2022

Jump to: 2021, 2020

Article
Workshop on Blood Loss Quantification in Obstetrics: Improving Medical Student Learning through Clinical Simulation
Healthcare 2022, 10(2), 399; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10020399 - 21 Feb 2022
Viewed by 555
Abstract
Purpose: To assess whether a clinical simulation-based obstetric blood loss quantification workshop for medical undergraduate trainees improves theoretical–practical knowledge, along with self-assurance and self-confidence. Methods: This was a quasi-experimental pre-post learning study conducted at the Gynaecology and Obstetrics Unit of the Hospital Gregorio [...] Read more.
Purpose: To assess whether a clinical simulation-based obstetric blood loss quantification workshop for medical undergraduate trainees improves theoretical–practical knowledge, along with self-assurance and self-confidence. Methods: This was a quasi-experimental pre-post learning study conducted at the Gynaecology and Obstetrics Unit of the Hospital Gregorio Marañón, Madrid, Spain. Participants were volunteer students in their fourth year of a 6-year degree course in Medicine. The study period was divided into the stages: pre-workshop, intra-workshop, 2 weeks post-workshop and 6 months post-workshop. In the pre-workshop stage, students completed a brief online course in preparation for the workshop. The effectiveness of the workshop was assessed through multiple choice tests and self-administered questionnaires. Data were compared between time-points using statistical tests for paired samples. Results: Of the 142 students invited (age 21.94 ± 3.12 years), 138 accepted the offer of the workshop (97.2%), and 85.4% had no experience in managing blood loss. Between the stages pre- and 2 weeks post-workshop, significant improvements were observed in theoretical–practical knowledge (μ = 1.109), self-assurance and self-confidence. At the 6 months post-workshop stage, theoretical–practical knowledge diminished compared with 2 weeks post-workshop, returning to pre-workshop levels, while self-assurance and confidence failed to vary significantly in the longer term. Conclusions: The obstetric workshop improved theoretical–practical knowledge and the self-assurance and confidence of the medical students. Results 2 weeks post-workshop were maintained up until 6 months after the training intervention. The clinical simulation-based workshop was perceived by the students as useful and necessary. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
A Preliminary Italian Cross-Sectional Study on the Level of Digital Psychiatry Training, Knowledge, Beliefs and Experiences among Medical Students, Psychiatry Trainees and Professionals
Healthcare 2022, 10(2), 390; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10020390 - 18 Feb 2022
Viewed by 357
Abstract
The COVID-19 pandemic led to the implementation of digital psychiatry (DP), resulting in the need for a new skilled healthcare workforce. The purpose of this study was to investigate the level of training, knowledge, beliefs, and experiences of young mental health professionals and [...] Read more.
The COVID-19 pandemic led to the implementation of digital psychiatry (DP), resulting in the need for a new skilled healthcare workforce. The purpose of this study was to investigate the level of training, knowledge, beliefs, and experiences of young mental health professionals and medical students in DP. An ad hoc cross-sectional survey was administered and descriptive analyses, Student’s t and ANOVA tests were conducted, together with an exploratory factor analysis, bivariate correlations and linear regression. Most of the sample (N = 239) declared that DP was never discussed within their academic training (89.1%), mainly revealing an overall lack of knowledge on the issue. Nevertheless, subjects mostly declared that DP represents a valuable therapeutic tool in mental health (80%) and that their training should include this topic (54.4%). Moreover, most subjects declared that digital interventions are less effective than face-to-face ones (73.2%), despite the emerging evidence that being trained in DP is significantly associated with the belief that digital and in-person interventions are comparable in their effectiveness (p ≤ 0.05). Strong positive correlations were found between the knowledge score (KS) and perceived significance index (PSI) (r = 0.148, p < 0.001), and KS and Digital Psychiatry Opinion (DPO) index (r = 0.193, p < 0.001). PSI scores statistically significantly predicted KS total scores (F(1, 237) = 5.283, R2 = 0.022, p = 0.022). KS scores statistically significantly predicted DPO total scores (F(1, 237) = 9.136, R2 = 0.037, p = 0.003). During the current pandemic, DP represented an ideal response to the forced physical distancing by ensuring the advantage of greater access to care. However, this kind of intervention is still uncommon, and mental health professionals still prove to be skeptical. The lack of formal training on DP during the academic years could be a limiting factor. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Students’ and Examiners’ Experiences of Their First Virtual Pharmacy Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) in Australia during the COVID-19 Pandemic
Healthcare 2022, 10(2), 328; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10020328 - 09 Feb 2022
Viewed by 453
Abstract
Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) are routinely used in healthcare education programs. Traditionally, students undertake OSCEs as face-to-face interactions to assess competency in soft skills. Due to physical distancing restrictions during COVID-19, alternative methods were required. This study utilized a mixed-method design (online [...] Read more.
Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) are routinely used in healthcare education programs. Traditionally, students undertake OSCEs as face-to-face interactions to assess competency in soft skills. Due to physical distancing restrictions during COVID-19, alternative methods were required. This study utilized a mixed-method design (online survey and interviews) to evaluate second-year pharmacy students’ and examiners’ experiences of their first virtual OSCEs in Australia. A total of 196 students completed their first virtual OSCE in June 2020 of which 190 students completed the online survey. However, out of the 190 students, only 88% (n = 167) consented to the use of the data from their online survey. A further 10 students and 12 examiners were interviewed. Fifty-five students (33%) who participated in the online survey strongly agreed or agreed that they preferred the virtual experience to face-to-face OSCEs while 44% (n = 73) neither agreed nor disagreed. Only 20% (n = 33) felt more anxious with the virtual OSCEs. Additionally, thematic analysis found non-verbal communication as a barrier during the OSCE. Positive aspects about virtual OSCEs included flexibility, decreased levels of anxiety and relevance with emerging telehealth practice. The need for remote online delivery of assessments saw innovative ways of undertaking OSCEs and an opportunity to mimic telehealth. While students and examiners embraced the virtual OSCE process, face-to-face OSCEs were still considered important and irreplaceable. Future opportunities for OSCEs to be delivered both face-to-face and virtually should be considered. Full article
Article
A Video-Based Reflective Design to Prepare First Year Pharmacy Students for Their First Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE)
Healthcare 2022, 10(2), 280; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10020280 - 31 Jan 2022
Viewed by 692
Abstract
We explored the use of a video-based reflective design in preparing first-year pharmacy students for their Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) in Victoria, Australia. This involved pre-workshop activities (a recording of themselves simulating the pharmacist responding to a simple primary care problem, written [...] Read more.
We explored the use of a video-based reflective design in preparing first-year pharmacy students for their Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) in Victoria, Australia. This involved pre-workshop activities (a recording of themselves simulating the pharmacist responding to a simple primary care problem, written reflection, review of the OSCE video examples and pre-workshop survey); workshop activities (peer feedback on videos) and post-workshop activities (summative MCQ quiz and post-workshop survey). These activities took place three weeks before their OSCE. A mixed-method study design was employed with quantitative and qualitative analyses of the surveys and a focus group. A total of 137 students (77.4%) completed the pre- and post-workshop surveys, and ten students participated in the focus group. More student participants (54%) reported feeling prepared for the OSCE post-workshop than pre-workshop (13%). The majority (92%) agreed that filming, watching and reflecting on their video allowed them to learn and improve on their skills for the OSCE. The regression analysis found that video recording submissions and written reflections correlated positively with student OSCE performances, and the video-based reflective design learning experience was perceived to be beneficial in multiple ways. Thematic analysis of the focus group data revealed that students acquired metacognitive skills through the self-assessment of their video recordings, developed an awareness of their learning and were able to identify learning strategies to prepare for their first OSCE. Fostering students’ feedback literacy could be considered in future educational designs. Full article
Article
Educational Videos as an Adjunct Learning Tool in Pre-Clinical Operative Dentistry—A Randomized Control Trial
Healthcare 2022, 10(2), 178; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10020178 - 18 Jan 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 323
Abstract
Background: E-learning is an important adjunct used for teaching clinical skills in medicine dentistry. This study evaluated and compared the effectiveness of e-learning resources as an additional teaching aid to traditional teaching methods in male and female students and based on CGPA scores [...] Read more.
Background: E-learning is an important adjunct used for teaching clinical skills in medicine dentistry. This study evaluated and compared the effectiveness of e-learning resources as an additional teaching aid to traditional teaching methods in male and female students and based on CGPA scores in a pre-clinical operative skill course. Methods: A randomized control trial was conducted in the College of Dentistry, Jouf University, to assess the impact of e-learning resources in learning clinical skills in a pre-clinical operative dentistry course. Fifty second-year dental students were randomly divided into two groups, with 25 students each. Group A (control group) was taught using traditional teaching methods, and Group B (intervention group) used e-learning resources along with traditional methods. Both groups were assessed using objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs). Standardized forms prepared by faculty members were used to assess the students. The students also filled in a questionnaire afterwards to provide feedback regarding the e-learning resources. Results: The difference between both groups was statistically significant (p < 0.05). Female students performed better in three OSCE stations out of six. Furthermore, the students positively responded to the use of additional resources. Conclusion: The use of e-learning resources in pre-clinical operative dentistry courses can be a useful adjunct to traditional teaching methods and can result in better learning of dental pre-clinical operative skills. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
An Abrupt Transition to Digital Teaching—Norwegian Medical Students and Their Experiences of Learning Output during the Initial Phase of the COVID-19 Lockdown
Healthcare 2022, 10(1), 170; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10010170 - 17 Jan 2022
Viewed by 411
Abstract
Norwegian universities closed almost all on-campus activities on the 12 March 2020 following a lockdown decision of the Norwegian government in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Online and digital teaching became the primary method of teaching. The goal of this study was to [...] Read more.
Norwegian universities closed almost all on-campus activities on the 12 March 2020 following a lockdown decision of the Norwegian government in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Online and digital teaching became the primary method of teaching. The goal of this study was to investigate how the transition to digital education impacted on medical students enrolled at the University of Bergen (UiB). Key points were motivation, experience of learning outcomes, and fear of missing out on important learning. Using an online questionnaire, students were asked to evaluate the quality of both lectures and taught clinical skills and to elaborate on their experience of learning output, examination, and digital teaching. Answers from 230 students were included in the study. Opinions on the quality and quantity of lectures offered and their experience of learning output varied based on gender, seniority and the amount of time spent on part time jobs. Students at UiB were generally unhappy with the quality of teaching, especially lessons on clinical skills, although both positive and negative experiences were reported. Securing a satisfying offer of clinical teaching will be important to ensure and increase the student experience of learning output in the time ahead. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

2021

Jump to: 2022, 2020

Article
Perception of E-Resources on the Learning Process among Students in the College of Health Sciences in King Saud University, Saudi Arabia, during the (COVID-19) Outbreak
Healthcare 2022, 10(1), 40; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10010040 - 26 Dec 2021
Viewed by 965
Abstract
Aim: to assess the impact of e-learning through different e-resources among health sciences students. Methodology: A cross-sectional design was conducted among health science students (n = 211; 134 female and 77 male) at King Saud University, Saudi Arabia. The data was collected [...] Read more.
Aim: to assess the impact of e-learning through different e-resources among health sciences students. Methodology: A cross-sectional design was conducted among health science students (n = 211; 134 female and 77 male) at King Saud University, Saudi Arabia. The data was collected using a previously used structured questionnaire to assess the impact of e-resources on learning. Results: The four most frequently used e-resources were: Zoom (38%), YouTube (31%), Google applications (29%), and Blackboard (27%). More than one-third of the students (35%) reportedly used e-resources for three or more hours daily. The majority of the students (55.9%) recognized a gender-related and age-related difference among faculty members in terms of e-resources usage. The majority of the students (58.2%) believe that online resources recommended by faculty members were credible. The majority of students believed that their academic performance was primarily influenced by these features of the e-resources: organization/logic of the content (64.5%), the credibility of the video (64.5%), and up to date “look and feel” of the video (60.6%). The study identified the most frequently used e-resources, gender, and age-related differences in faculty members’ use of e-resources, students’ overwhelming reliance on faculty feedback regarding the credibility of e-resources, and three most important characteristics (organization, credibility, and updated status) of e-resources. Conclusion: e-learning resources had a significant impact on participating students’ education as they were used very frequently during their health sciences’ courses. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Improving Humanization Skills through Simulation-Based Computers Using Simulated Nursing Video Consultations
Healthcare 2022, 10(1), 37; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10010037 - 26 Dec 2021
Viewed by 981
Abstract
During the COVID-19 confinement, we converted our clinical simulation sessions into simulated video consultations. This study aims to evaluate the effects of virtual simulation-based training on developing and cultivating humanization competencies in undergraduate nursing students. A quasi-experimental study was conducted with 60 undergraduate [...] Read more.
During the COVID-19 confinement, we converted our clinical simulation sessions into simulated video consultations. This study aims to evaluate the effects of virtual simulation-based training on developing and cultivating humanization competencies in undergraduate nursing students. A quasi-experimental study was conducted with 60 undergraduate nursing students. A validated questionnaire was used to evaluate the acquisition of humanization competencies (self-efficacy, sociability, affection, emotional understanding, and optimism). The development of humanization competencies in this group composed of undergraduate nursing students was evaluated using virtual simulation-based training, comparing the levels obtained in these competencies at baseline (pre-test) and after the virtual simulation experience (post-test). After the virtual simulation sessions, students improved their levels in humanization total score and the emotional understanding and self-efficacy competencies, obtaining large effects sizes in all of them (rB = 0.508, rB = 0.713, and rB = 0.505 respectively). This virtual simulation modality enables training in the humanization of care with the collaboration of standardized patients in the form of simulated nursing video consultations and the performance of high-fidelity simulation sessions that comply with the requirements of best practices. Therefore, this methodology could be considered as another choice for virtual simulation. Additionally, this virtual modality could be a way to humanize virtual simulation. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Study Protocol
Knowledge Retention of the NIH Stroke Scale among Stroke Unit Health Care Workers Using Video vs. E-Learning: Protocol for a Web-Based, Randomized Controlled Trial
Healthcare 2021, 9(11), 1460; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9111460 - 28 Oct 2021
Viewed by 666
Abstract
The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) is commonly used to triage and monitor the evolution of stroke victims. Data regarding NIHSS knowledge in nurses and physicians working with stroke patients are scarce, and a progressive decline in specific knowledge regarding this [...] Read more.
The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) is commonly used to triage and monitor the evolution of stroke victims. Data regarding NIHSS knowledge in nurses and physicians working with stroke patients are scarce, and a progressive decline in specific knowledge regarding this challenging scale is to be expected even among NIHSS certified personnel. This protocol was designed according to the CONSORT-eHealth (Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials) guidelines. It describes the design of a randomized controlled trial whose primary objective is to determine if nurses and physicians who work in stroke units improve their NIHSS knowledge more significantly after following a highly interactive e-learning module than after following the traditional didactic video. Univariate and multivariable linear regression will be used to analyze the primary outcome, which will be the difference between the score on a 50-question quiz answered before and immediately after following the allocated learning material. Secondary outcomes will include knowledge retention at one month, assessed using the same 50-question quiz, user satisfaction, user course duration perception, and probability of recommending the allocated learning method. The study is scheduled to begin during the first semester of 2022. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Development of an Online Asynchronous Clinical Learning Resource (“Ask the Expert”) in Dental Education to Promote Personalized Learning
Healthcare 2021, 9(11), 1420; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9111420 - 22 Oct 2021
Viewed by 428
Abstract
This article describes the development and testing of an online asynchronous clinical learning resource named “Ask the Expert” to enhance clinical learning in dentistry. After the resource development, dental students from years 3 and 4 were randomly allocated to two groups (Group A—“Ask [...] Read more.
This article describes the development and testing of an online asynchronous clinical learning resource named “Ask the Expert” to enhance clinical learning in dentistry. After the resource development, dental students from years 3 and 4 were randomly allocated to two groups (Group A—“Ask the Expert” and L—“lecturer-led”). All the students attempted a pre-test related to replacement of teeth in the anterior aesthetic zone. Group A (33 students) underwent an online case-based learning session of 60 minutes’ duration without a facilitator, while Group L (27 students) concurrently underwent a case-based learning session of 60 minutes’ duration with a lecturer facilitating the session. An immediate post-test was conducted followed by a retention test after one week. Student feedback was obtained. There was a significant increase in the test scores (maximum score 10) for both groups when comparing the pre-test (Group A—5.61 ± 1.34, Group L—5.22 ± 1.57) and immediate post-test scores (Group A—7.42 ± 1.34, Group L—8.04 ± 1.22; paired t-test, p < 0.001). However, no significant difference was observed in the test scores when comparing Group A to Group L for both the immediate post-test as well as the retention test (Group A—5.36 ± 1.29, Group L—5.33 ± 1.39 (independent sample t-test, p > 0.05). To conclude, adequately structured online asynchronous learning resources are comparable in their effectiveness to online synchronous learning in the undergraduate dental curriculum. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Social Media Usage among Dental Undergraduate Students—A Comparative Study
Healthcare 2021, 9(11), 1408; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9111408 - 20 Oct 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 800
Abstract
Social media use among students has infiltrated into dental education and offers benefits but may also cause problems. The aim of this study was to explore and compare current social media usage among dental undergraduate students from two countries—Malaysia and Finland. A self-administered [...] Read more.
Social media use among students has infiltrated into dental education and offers benefits but may also cause problems. The aim of this study was to explore and compare current social media usage among dental undergraduate students from two countries—Malaysia and Finland. A self-administered structured online questionnaire was used. WhatsApp, YouTube, Instagram, Facebook and Snapchat were the services that were most familiar to the respondents from both countries. There were differences between the students from the two countries among the most preferred platforms. The most frequently used applications were WhatsApp (91.1% of students in Malaysia and 96.1% in Finland used it very frequently) and Instagram (74.3% of students in Malaysia and 70.0% in Finland used it very frequently). Students in Malaysia spent significantly more hours per week using the platforms as study tools than students in Finland. Over 80% of the Finnish dental students reported that lack of knowledge was not an issue in social media usage, while 85% of Malaysian students felt that lack of knowledge prevented them from using social media platforms frequently. The findings offer evidence that dental students used social media extensively. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Pharmacy Student Challenges and Strategies towards Initial COVID-19 Curriculum Changes
Healthcare 2021, 9(10), 1322; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9101322 - 04 Oct 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 928
Abstract
Due to COVID-19, tertiary institutions were forced to deliver knowledge virtually, which proposed challenges for both institutions and students. In this study, we aimed to characterize pharmacy students’ challenges and strategies during COVID-19 curriculum changes, therefore developing a comprehensive understanding of students’ learning, [...] Read more.
Due to COVID-19, tertiary institutions were forced to deliver knowledge virtually, which proposed challenges for both institutions and students. In this study, we aimed to characterize pharmacy students’ challenges and strategies during COVID-19 curriculum changes, therefore developing a comprehensive understanding of students’ learning, wellbeing, and resilience in the ever-changing situation. Data were collected from student written reflections across four year levels at one school of pharmacy from March–May 2020. In addition, data were collected from written responses of second-year pharmacy students responding to prompted questions. The data were qualitatively analyzed inductively by five coders using NVivo 12. For each piece of data, two coders independently coded the data, calculated the inter-rater agreement, and resolved discrepancies. The most coded challenges were ‘negative emotional response’ and ‘communication barrier during virtual learning’. The most coded strategies were ‘using new technology’ and ‘time management’. This study allows researchers and education institutions to gain an overview of pharmacy students’ experiences during COVID-19, therefore helping universities to provide students with necessary support and techniques on how to self-cope with COVID-19 as well as stressful events in the future. Full article
Article
AI for Doctors—A Course to Educate Medical Professionals in Artificial Intelligence for Medical Imaging
Healthcare 2021, 9(10), 1278; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9101278 - 28 Sep 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 878
Abstract
Successful adoption of artificial intelligence (AI) in medical imaging requires medical professionals to understand underlying principles and techniques. However, educational offerings tailored to the need of medical professionals are scarce. To fill this gap, we created the course “AI for Doctors: Medical Imaging”. [...] Read more.
Successful adoption of artificial intelligence (AI) in medical imaging requires medical professionals to understand underlying principles and techniques. However, educational offerings tailored to the need of medical professionals are scarce. To fill this gap, we created the course “AI for Doctors: Medical Imaging”. An analysis of participants’ opinions on AI and self-perceived skills rated on a five-point Likert scale was conducted before and after the course. The participants’ attitude towards AI in medical imaging was very optimistic before and after the course. However, deeper knowledge of AI and the process for validating and deploying it resulted in significantly less overoptimism with respect to perceivable patient benefits through AI (p = 0.020). Self-assessed skill ratings significantly improved after the course, and the appreciation of the course content was very positive. However, we observed a substantial drop-out rate, mostly attributed to the lack of time of medical professionals. There is a high demand for educational offerings regarding AI in medical imaging among medical professionals, and better education may lead to a more realistic appreciation of clinical adoption. However, time constraints imposed by a busy clinical schedule need to be taken into account for successful education of medical professionals. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Social Media Improves Students’ Academic Performance: Exploring the Role of Social Media Adoption in the Open Learning Environment among International Medical Students in China
Healthcare 2021, 9(10), 1272; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9101272 - 26 Sep 2021
Viewed by 1260
Abstract
Numerous studies have examined the role of social media as an open-learning (OL) tool in the field of education, but the empirical evidence necessary to validate such OL tools is scant, specifically in terms of student academic performance (AP). In today’s digital age, [...] Read more.
Numerous studies have examined the role of social media as an open-learning (OL) tool in the field of education, but the empirical evidence necessary to validate such OL tools is scant, specifically in terms of student academic performance (AP). In today’s digital age, social media platforms are most popular among the student community, and they provide opportunities for OL where they can easily communicate, interact, and collaborate with each other. The authors of this study aimed to minimize the literature gap among student communities who adopt social media for OL, which has positive impacts on their AP in Chinese higher education. We adopted social constructivism theory (SCT) and the technology acceptance model (TAM) to formulate a conceptual framework. Primary data containing 233 questionnaires of international medical students in China were collected in January 2021 through the survey method. The gathered data were analyzed through structural equation modeling techniques with SmartPLS 3. The results revealed that perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, and interactions with peers have positive and significant influence on OL. In addition, OL was found to have positive and significant influence on students’ AP and engagement. Lastly, engagement showed a positive impact on students’ AP. Thus, this study shows that social media serves as a dynamic tool to expedite the development of OL settings by encouraging collaboration, group discussion, and the exchange of ideas between students that reinforce their learning behavior and performance. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
E-Learning as a Factor Optimizing the Amount of Work Time Devoted to Preparing an Exam for Medical Program Students during the COVID-19 Epidemic Situation
Healthcare 2021, 9(9), 1147; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9091147 - 02 Sep 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 5439
Abstract
The COVID-19 pandemic had a huge impact on the learning and teaching processes, particularly in healthcare education and training, because of the principal position of the cutting-edge student–patient interaction. Replacing the traditional form of organization and implementation of knowledge evaluation with its web-based [...] Read more.
The COVID-19 pandemic had a huge impact on the learning and teaching processes, particularly in healthcare education and training, because of the principal position of the cutting-edge student–patient interaction. Replacing the traditional form of organization and implementation of knowledge evaluation with its web-based equivalent on an e-learning platform optimizes the whole didactic process not only for the unit carrying it out but, above all, for students. This research is focused on the effectiveness of the application of e-learning for computer-based knowledge evaluation and optimizing exam administration for students of medical sciences. The proposed approach is considered in two categories: from the perspective of the providers of the evaluation process, that is, the teaching unit; and the recipients of the evaluation process, that is, the students. Full article
Article
Lessons Learned from Developing Digital Teaching Modules for Medical Student Education in Neurosurgery during the COVID-19 Pandemic
Healthcare 2021, 9(9), 1141; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9091141 - 01 Sep 2021
Viewed by 770
Abstract
Background: The coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic forced students and teachers to rapidly adopt digital education methods. Proper guidance for and refinement of such methods is continuously required. Here, we report on the educational experience students and academic staff at the neurosurgical department of [...] Read more.
Background: The coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic forced students and teachers to rapidly adopt digital education methods. Proper guidance for and refinement of such methods is continuously required. Here, we report on the educational experience students and academic staff at the neurosurgical department of a German university hospital made with digital teaching modules (DTMs) that were newly developed due to the transition to digital teaching during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic and on the insights gained therefrom. Methods: Nine newly created DTMs provided students the option to anonymously evaluate each module by assigning a score from 0 (worst value) to 5 (best value) to it. Access count, evaluation count, average evaluation, number of included (interactive) figures, number of presented cases, number of linked publications, and number of included multiple-choice questions for each DTM were recorded retrospectively. For each DTM, we aimed to correlate access count, evaluation count, and average evaluation with the number of included (interactive) figures, number of presented cases, number of linked publications, and number of included multiple-choice questions. E-mail responses from individual students as to the DTMs were collected. Among students, an anonymous, voluntary online survey regarding the DTMs was conducted. Results: Number of figures and average evaluation per DTM were significantly positively correlated (Spearman’s rho = 0.85; p = 0.0037). Number of figures and number of evaluations per DTM were also significantly positively correlated (Spearman’s rho = 0.78; p = 0.0137). Responses from individual students indicated that illustrative cases and interactive figures might further increase DTM popularity. Conclusion: As a valuable adjunct in medical student education, DTMs should contain (interactive) figures, illustrative cases, a scoring option, and the option to give individual feedback towards the academic staff. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
An Interprofessional E-Learning Resource to Prepare Students for Clinical Practice in the Operating Room—A Mixed Method Study from the Students’ Perspective
Healthcare 2021, 9(8), 1028; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9081028 - 11 Aug 2021
Viewed by 620
Abstract
The operating room is a challenging learning environment for many students. Preparedness for practice is important as perceived stress and the fear of making mistakes are known to hamper learning. The aim was to evaluate students’ perspectives of an e-learning resource for achieving [...] Read more.
The operating room is a challenging learning environment for many students. Preparedness for practice is important as perceived stress and the fear of making mistakes are known to hamper learning. The aim was to evaluate students’ perspectives of an e-learning resource for achieving preparedness. A mixed methods design was used. Students (n = 52) from three educational nursing and medical programs were included. A questionnaire was used to explore demographics, student use of the e-learning resource, and how the learning activities had helped them prepare for their clinical placement. Five focus group interviews were conducted as a complement. Most students (79%) stated that the resource prepared them for their clinical placement and helped them to feel more relaxed when attending to the operating room. In total, 93% of the students recommended other students to use the e-learning resource prior to a clinical placement in the operating room. Activities containing films focusing on practical procedures were rated as the most useful. We conclude that an e-learning resource seems to increase students’ perceived preparedness for their clinical practice in the operating room. The development of e-learning resources has its challenges, and we recommend student involvement to evaluate the content. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Perception of the Online Learning Environment of Nursing Students in Slovenia: Validation of the DREEM Questionnaire
Healthcare 2021, 9(8), 998; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9080998 - 05 Aug 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1347
Abstract
At the time of the outbreak of the coronavirus pandemic, several measures were in place to limit the spread of the virus, such as lockdown and restriction of social contacts. Many colleges thus had to shift their education from personal to online form [...] Read more.
At the time of the outbreak of the coronavirus pandemic, several measures were in place to limit the spread of the virus, such as lockdown and restriction of social contacts. Many colleges thus had to shift their education from personal to online form overnight. The educational environment itself has a significant influence on students’ learning outcomes, knowledge, and satisfaction. This study aims to validate the tool for assessing the educational environment in the Slovenian nursing student population. To assess the educational environment, we used the DREEM tool distributed among nursing students using an online platform. First, we translated the survey questionnaire from English into Slovenian using the reverse translation technique. We also validated the DREEM survey questionnaire. We performed psychometric testing and content validation. I-CVI and S-CVI are at an acceptable level. A high degree of internal consistency was present, as Cronbach’s alpha was 0.951. The questionnaire was completed by 174 participants, of whom 30 were men and 143 were women. One person did not define gender. The mean age of students was 21.1 years (SD = 3.96). The mean DREEM score was 122.2. The mean grade of student perception of learning was 58.54%, student perception of teachers was 65.68%, student academic self-perception was 61.88%, student perception of the atmosphere was 60.63%, and social self-perception of students was 58.93%. Although coronavirus has affected the educational process, students still perceive the educational environment as positive. Nevertheless, there is still room for improvement in all assessed areas. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Lapnurse—A Blended Learning Course for Nursing Education in Minimally Invasive Surgery: Design and Experts’ Preliminary Validation of Its Online Theoretical Module
Healthcare 2021, 9(8), 951; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9080951 - 28 Jul 2021
Viewed by 713
Abstract
Background: The implantation of Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS) leads to the specialization of nurses in this surgical field. However, there is no standard curriculum of MIS Nursing in Europe. Spanish and Portuguese nurses are inexperienced and have poor training in MIS. For that, [...] Read more.
Background: The implantation of Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS) leads to the specialization of nurses in this surgical field. However, there is no standard curriculum of MIS Nursing in Europe. Spanish and Portuguese nurses are inexperienced and have poor training in MIS. For that, a blended learning course for nursing education in MIS (Lapnurse) has been developed. This work aims to detail the course design and to preliminary validate by experts its online theoretical module. Methods: Lapnurse consists of an online module with nine theoretical lessons and a face-to-face module with three practical lessons. The e-learning environment created to provide the online module, with didactic contents based on surgical videos and innovative 3D designs, has been validated by two technicians (functionality) and four nurses with teaching experience in MIS (usability and content). Results: The E-learning platform meets all technical requirements, provides whole and updated multimedia contents correctly applied for educational purposes, incorporates interactivity with 3D designs, and has an attractive, easy-to-use and intuitive design. Conclusions: The lack of knowledge in MIS of Spanish and Portuguese nurses could be addressed by the blended learning course created, Lapnurse, where the e-learning environment that provides theoretical training has obtained a positive validation. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Medical Faculty’s and Students’ Perceptions toward Pediatric Electronic OSCE during the COVID-19 Pandemic in Saudi Arabia
Healthcare 2021, 9(8), 950; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9080950 - 28 Jul 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 731
Abstract
Background: The educational process in different medical schools has been negatively affected by the COVID-19 pandemic worldwide. As a part of the Saudi government’s attempts to contain the spread of the virus, schools’ and universities’ educational activities and face-to-face lectures have been modified [...] Read more.
Background: The educational process in different medical schools has been negatively affected by the COVID-19 pandemic worldwide. As a part of the Saudi government’s attempts to contain the spread of the virus, schools’ and universities’ educational activities and face-to-face lectures have been modified to virtual classrooms. The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of the faculty and the students of an electronic objective structured clinical examination (E-OSCE) activity that took place during the COVID-19 pandemic in the oldest medical school in Saudi Arabia. Methods: An e-OSCE style examination was designed for the final-year medical students by the pediatrics department, College of Medicine at King Saud University in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The examination was administered by Zoom™ video conferencing where both students and faculty participated through their laptop or desktop computers. In order to explore the students’ and the faculty’s perceptions about this experience, a newly designed 13-item online questionnaire was administered at the end of the e-OSCE. Results: Out of 136 participants (23 faculty and 112 students), 73 respondents (e.g., 54% response rate) filled out the questionnaire. Most of the respondents (69.8%) were very comfortable with this new virtual experience. Most participants (53.4%) preferred the e-OSCE compared to the classic face-to-face clinical OSCE during the pandemic. Regarding the e-OSCE assessment student tool, 46.6% reported that it is similar to the classic face-to-face OSCE; however, 38.4% felt it was worse. Conclusions: The e-OSCE can be a very effective alternative to the classic face-to-face OSCE due to the current circumstances that still pose a significant risk of infection transmission. Future studies should examine different virtual strategies to ensure effective OSCE delivery from the perspective of both faculty and students. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Analysis of the Content and Comprehensiveness of Dermatology Residency Training Websites in Taiwan
Healthcare 2021, 9(6), 773; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9060773 - 21 Jun 2021
Viewed by 659
Abstract
With a growing trend in the popularity of web-based resources, it is important to evaluate residency program websites for providing accurate information for dermatology residency applicants. Little is known about the quality of dermatology residency websites in Taiwan. The aim of the study [...] Read more.
With a growing trend in the popularity of web-based resources, it is important to evaluate residency program websites for providing accurate information for dermatology residency applicants. Little is known about the quality of dermatology residency websites in Taiwan. The aim of the study is to assesses the quality of official websites of dermatology training programs in Taiwan. A literature search for all related studies from inception to 31 July 2020 was performed using PubMed without restriction on language. We used criteria that had 6 domains and 25 items to evaluate 23 official websites of the dermatology training programs in Taiwan from August to September 2020. Of the 23 training programs, only 6 (26%) of the websites met more than half of the criteria. Notably, the items “features of the department” and “comprehensive faculty listing” were included in all websites. The criteria for interview process, board pass rates, social activities and information on the surrounding area were not met by all websites. Evidently, there is much room for improvement for the dermatology training program websites in Taiwan. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Facilitating Interprofessional Education in an Online Environment during the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Mixed Method Study
Healthcare 2021, 9(5), 567; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9050567 - 11 May 2021
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 2582
Abstract
With the COVID-19 crisis and rapid increase in cases, the need for interprofessional education (IPE) and collaborative practice is more important than ever. Instructors and health professionals are exploring innovative methods to deliver IPE programs in online education This paper presents a mixed [...] Read more.
With the COVID-19 crisis and rapid increase in cases, the need for interprofessional education (IPE) and collaborative practice is more important than ever. Instructors and health professionals are exploring innovative methods to deliver IPE programs in online education This paper presents a mixed methods study where an interprofessional education program was delivered/taught using online instruction. Using a survey/questionnaire adapted from the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS) and qualitative discussions, students’ readiness towards online IPE program and the importance of such preparation was examined. Out of two hundred fifteen students who completed the IPE program, one hundred eighty five students from clinical and non-clinical health disciplines responded to the questionnaire (86.04% response rate). Additional qualitative content analysis was conducted on a total of seven hundred and thirty six online discussions. Data analysis across all the four subscales of RIPLS suggests that students felt positively about teamwork and collaboration, and valued opportunities for shared learning with other healthcare students. Qualitative data analysis demonstrated that IPE increases awareness of team members’ roles, enhances communication and collaboration and can lead to better care for COVID-19 patients. Full article
Article
Online Problem-Based Learning in Clinical Dental Education: Students’ Self-Perception and Motivation
Healthcare 2021, 9(4), 420; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9040420 - 05 Apr 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1869
Abstract
The physical closure of higher education institutions due to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) shed a brighter light on the need to analyze, explore, and implement strategies that allow the development of clinical skills in a distance learning situation. This cross-sectional study aims to [...] Read more.
The physical closure of higher education institutions due to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) shed a brighter light on the need to analyze, explore, and implement strategies that allow the development of clinical skills in a distance learning situation. This cross-sectional study aims to assess dental students’ self-perception, motivation, organization, acquired clinical skills, and knowledge using the online problem-based learning method, through the application of a 41-item questionnaire to 118 senior students. Answers were subjected to descriptive and inferential statistics analysis. Further, a principal component analysis was performed, in order to examine the factor structure of the questionnaire. Results show that online problem-based learning can be considered a relevant learning tool when utilized within the specific context of clinical dental education, displaying benefits over the traditional learning strategy. Overall, dental students prefer a hybrid system over the conventional one, in a distance learning context, and assume self-responsibility for their own learning, while knowledge thoroughness is perceived as inferior. This online active learning method is successful in improving information and clinical ability (visual/spatial and auditory) advancement in the scope of dental education, with similar results to presential settings. Further studies are required to assess clinical skill development through active learning methods, in a distance learning context. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Experiences of Pathology Course among Hospital Management Graduates
Healthcare 2021, 9(3), 347; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9030347 - 18 Mar 2021
Viewed by 603
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to explore hospital management graduates’ experience in pathology courses. Data were gathered through four focus group interviews by 16 hospital management graduates who attended pathology courses. Data were collected from June to August, 2020. Conventional content analysis [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to explore hospital management graduates’ experience in pathology courses. Data were gathered through four focus group interviews by 16 hospital management graduates who attended pathology courses. Data were collected from June to August, 2020. Conventional content analysis was used for data analysis. Six categories were extracted that described hospital management graduates’ experience in pathology courses, as follows: “Suggestions for the curriculum,” “Students’ preference for pathology professor,” “Demands for various teaching methods,” “Broad and difficult class content,” “Recognition of pathology courses during college years,” and “The importance of studying the pathology course realized after graduation.” The findings suggest that it is important to identify hospital management graduates’ perspectives to improve pathology curriculum in the educational process. Additionally, it is necessary to continuously connect educational and practical environments for the effective management of pathology courses. Full article
Article
The Usefulness of the QR Code in Orthotic Applications after Orthopedic Surgery
Healthcare 2021, 9(3), 298; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9030298 - 08 Mar 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 819
Abstract
The purpose of this study is to evaluate the utility of QR (quick response) codes in explaining the proper method for orthotic use after orthopedic surgery. A questionnaire survey was adopted to evaluate patient satisfaction with education and training in orthotic applications after [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study is to evaluate the utility of QR (quick response) codes in explaining the proper method for orthotic use after orthopedic surgery. A questionnaire survey was adopted to evaluate patient satisfaction with education and training in orthotic applications after orthopedic surgery. The study periods were 1 April to 30 April 2017, and 1 October to 31 October 2017. The oral training involving the conventional orthoses was conducted in April, and the videos with the orthosis on the QR code were captured in October. The QR code containing the data was distributed and the education was conducted. A total of 68 patients (QR-code group: 33) participated in the questionnaire survey. After the QR code application, the number of retraining cases increased from 62.9 to 93.9% (p-value < 0.01). The mean scores of the four items measuring the comprehension increased from 10.97 to 14.39. The satisfaction level rose from 7.14 to 9.30, and the performance increased from 7.14 to 9.52 (p-value < 0.01). The QR code is expected to be a valuable method for explaining the orthotic application after orthopedic surgery, and especially when repeated explanations are needed for elderly patients. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Technical Note
Immersive 3D Educational Contents: A Technical Note for Dental Educators
Healthcare 2021, 9(2), 178; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9020178 - 07 Feb 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 794
Abstract
Three-dimensional files featuring patients’ geometry can be obtained through common tools in dental practice, such as an intraoral scanner (IOS) or Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT). The use of 3D files in medical education is promoted, but only few methodologies were reported due [...] Read more.
Three-dimensional files featuring patients’ geometry can be obtained through common tools in dental practice, such as an intraoral scanner (IOS) or Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT). The use of 3D files in medical education is promoted, but only few methodologies were reported due to the lack of ease to use and accessible protocols for educators. The aim of this work was to present innovative and accessible methodologies to create 3D files in dental education. The first step requires the definition of the educational outcomes and the situations of interest. The second step relies on the use of IOS and CBCT to digitize the content. The last “post-treatment” steps involve free software for analysis of quality, re-meshing and simplifying the file in accordance with the desired educational activity. Several examples of educational activities using 3D files are illustrated in dental education and discussed. Three-dimensional files open up many accessible applications for a dental educator, but further investigations are required to develop collaborative tools and prevent educational inequalities between establishments. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

2020

Jump to: 2022, 2021

Article
The Impact of Teammates’ Online Reputations on Physicians’ Online Appointment Numbers: A Social Interdependency Perspective
Healthcare 2020, 8(4), 509; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8040509 - 23 Nov 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 650
Abstract
Online medical team is an emerging online medical model in which patients can choose a doctor to register and consult. A doctor’s reputation cannot be ignored. It is worth studying how that online reputation affects the focal doctor’s appointment numbers on the online [...] Read more.
Online medical team is an emerging online medical model in which patients can choose a doctor to register and consult. A doctor’s reputation cannot be ignored. It is worth studying how that online reputation affects the focal doctor’s appointment numbers on the online medical team. Based on the online reputation mechanism and social interdependence theory, this study empirically studied the impact of the focal doctor’s own reputation and other teammates’ reputation on his/her appointment numbers. Our data include 31,143 doctors from 6103 online expert teams of Guahao.com. The results indicate that for a leader doctor, his/her appointment numbers are not related to his/her own reputation, and there was an inverted U-shaped relationship with the ordinary doctors’ reputations on the team. For an ordinary doctor, his/her appointment numbers were positively correlated with his/her own reputation and positively correlated with his/her leader’s reputation and there was an inverted U-shaped relationship with the other ordinary doctors’ reputations. The research showed that there is a positive spillover effect on the team leader’s reputation. There are two relationships between team doctors: competition and cooperation. This study provides guidance for the leader to select team members and the ordinary doctor to select a team. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Development of a Novel Interactive Multimedia E-Learning Model to Enhance Clinical Competency Training and Quality of Care among Medical Students
Healthcare 2020, 8(4), 500; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8040500 - 20 Nov 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 817
Abstract
Clinical competencies consisting of skills, knowledge, and communication techniques should be acquired by all medical graduates to optimize healthcare quality. However, transitioning from observation to hands-on learning in clinical competencies poses a challenge to medical students. The aim of this study is to [...] Read more.
Clinical competencies consisting of skills, knowledge, and communication techniques should be acquired by all medical graduates to optimize healthcare quality. However, transitioning from observation to hands-on learning in clinical competencies poses a challenge to medical students. The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of a novel interactive multimedia eBook curriculum in clinical competency training. Ninety-six medical students were recruited. Students in the control group (n = 46) were taught clinical competencies via conventional teaching, while students in the experimental group (n = 50) were taught with conventional teaching plus interactive multimedia eBooks. The outcomes of clinical competencies were evaluated using Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) scores, and feedback on their interactive eBook experiences was obtained. In the experimental group, the average National OSCE scores were not only higher than the control group (214.8 vs. 206.5, p < 0.001), but also showed a quicker improvement when comparing between three consecutive mock OSCEs (p < 0.001). In response to open-ended questions, participants emphasized the importance of eBooks in improving their abilities and self-confidence when dealing with ‘difficult’ patients. Implementing interactive multimedia eBooks could prompt a more rapid improvement in clinical skill performance to provide safer healthcare, indicating the potential of our innovative module in enhancing clinical competencies. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
To Develop Health Education Tools for Nasogastric Tube Home Caring Through Participatory Action Research
Healthcare 2020, 8(3), 261; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8030261 - 10 Aug 2020
Viewed by 1206
Abstract
Medical institutions provide guidance on caring skills for home caregivers. Oral teaching is combined with graphical tools in a method that has been proved to be an effective way of quickly mastering home caring skills and promotes effective learning for home caregivers. The [...] Read more.
Medical institutions provide guidance on caring skills for home caregivers. Oral teaching is combined with graphical tools in a method that has been proved to be an effective way of quickly mastering home caring skills and promotes effective learning for home caregivers. The graphic design and operation contents of this method are constantly revised through interviews and observations, and by carrying out home care application graphics it forms a spiral structure of Plan–Do–Study–Act (PDSA) participatory action research (PAR). In the three cycles of the operation of PDSA PAR, the designers accurately create graphics of the caring details based on the nurses’ demonstrations and develop health education tools that are suitable to provide continuous assistance and services in real-life situations. PAR combined with PDSA, in each of the three cycles of the operation—design personnel, medical personnel and home caregiver personnel, respectively—as the lead roles, guide the planning decisions for PAR. This study is a reference for the improvement and development of medical graphics for health education tools to improve accuracy. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Exploring Pictorial Health Education Tools for Long-Term Home Care: A Qualitative Perspective
Healthcare 2020, 8(3), 205; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8030205 - 09 Jul 2020
Viewed by 1329
Abstract
Regarding long-term home care needs, nurses need to communicate effectively and reasonably when teaching home caregivers. Designers can assist medical staff and develop pictorial tools to enhance communication. The purpose of this study is to explore a theoretical basis from the perspective of [...] Read more.
Regarding long-term home care needs, nurses need to communicate effectively and reasonably when teaching home caregivers. Designers can assist medical staff and develop pictorial tools to enhance communication. The purpose of this study is to explore a theoretical basis from the perspective of designers, patients’ home caregivers, and medical staff to construct a theoretical framework that can jointly develop pictorial health education tools and healthcare system. The qualitative methods, including in-depth interview and observation, are applied to this study; ground theory sets out to construct a framework from the verbatim transcript of the interviews. Based on interview results, six axial codes were extracted: (1) the method of interdisciplinary cooperation; (2) medical research ethics; (3) communication methods; (4) forms of health education tools; (5) development of health education tools; (6) home care intubation procedure. Eight groups of home caregivers offered suggestions from their experiences. The designers need to assist medical staff to solve real problems, pay attention to professional norms, and forms of cooperation. Health education tools need to meet the needs of medical staff and home caregivers and designers should pay attention to the processes of communication. This study can also assist in interdisciplinary cooperation to explore the theoretical basis of pictorial health education tools for nurses in the context of long-term care at home. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Analysis of User Satisfaction with Online Education Platforms in China during the COVID-19 Pandemic
Healthcare 2020, 8(3), 200; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8030200 - 07 Jul 2020
Cited by 127 | Viewed by 24102
Abstract
The outbreak of Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in various countries at the end of last year has transferred traditional face-to-face teaching to online education platforms, which directly affects the quality of education. Taking user satisfaction on online education platforms in China as [...] Read more.
The outbreak of Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in various countries at the end of last year has transferred traditional face-to-face teaching to online education platforms, which directly affects the quality of education. Taking user satisfaction on online education platforms in China as the research object, this paper uses a questionnaire survey and web crawler to collect experience data of online and offline users, constructs a customer satisfaction index system by analyzing emotion and the existing literature for quantitative analysis, and builds aback propagation (BP) neural network model to forecast user satisfaction. The conclusion shows that users’ personal factors have no direct influence on user satisfaction, while platform availability has the greatest influence on user satisfaction. Finally, suggestions on improving the online education platform are given to escalate the level of online education during the COVID-19 pandemic, so as to promote the reform of information-based education. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop