Special Issue "Urgent and Acute Prehospital Care"

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032). This special issue belongs to the section "Prehospital Care".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 June 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Tim Kilner
Website
Guest Editor
University of Worcester, UK
Interests: urgent and acute prehospital care; major incident and field triage; legal and professional aspects of prehospital practice; education of prehospital clinicians

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

For many patients in need of urgent or acute care, their journey starts before they enter primary, secondary or tertiary services. The term prehospital care has frequently been used to describe this initial phase of the patient journey but does not do justice to the complexity and diversity of the care provided to individuals at the first point of contact with healthcare services. This Special Issue seeks to illuminate the breadth and sophistication of clinical care provided to patients before their access to and in partnership with primary, secondary, and tertiary care services.

This Special Issue seeks to illuminate the breadth andsophistication of clinical care provided to patients beforetheir access to and in partnership with primary, secondary,and tertiary care services. The Special Issue will featureoriginal research, reviews, and short reports reflecting thediversity of prehospital urgent and acute care provided byhealthcare providers with a range of professionalbackgrounds. Of particular interest would be papers in, butnot limited to, the areas of assessment and managementof patients in the prehospital phase of care across the agespan from birth to older age, during pregnancy, those with mental health needs, and vulnerable individuals. Papers may consider emergency and acute care, as well as urgentcare interventions, be that trauma, surgical, medical or mental health. We would also be interested in papersconsidering nonclinical aspects of prehospital care such asmultiprofessional working, the education of prehospitalclinicians, and legal aspects of prehospital practice.

Dr. Tim Kilner
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Healthcare is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Prehospital
  • EMS
  • Paramedic
  • Ambulance
  • Major incident triage
  • Field triage

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Evaluation of a Prehospital Rotation by Senior Residents: A Web-Based Survey
Healthcare 2021, 9(1), 24; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9010024 - 29 Dec 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 312
Abstract
The added value of prehospital emergency medicine is usually assessed by measuring patient-centered outcomes. Prehospital rotations might however also help senior residents acquire specific skills and knowledge. To assess the perceived added value of the prehospital rotation in comparison with other rotations, we [...] Read more.
The added value of prehospital emergency medicine is usually assessed by measuring patient-centered outcomes. Prehospital rotations might however also help senior residents acquire specific skills and knowledge. To assess the perceived added value of the prehospital rotation in comparison with other rotations, we analyzed web-based questionnaires sent between September 2011 and August 2020 to senior residents who had just completed a prehospital rotation. The primary outcome was the perceived benefit of the prehospital rotation in comparison with other rotations regarding technical and non-technical skills. Secondary outcomes included resident satisfaction regarding the prehospital rotation and regarding supervision. A pre-specified subgroup analysis was performed to search for differences according to the participants’ service of origin (anesthesiology, emergency medicine, or internal medicine). The completion rate was of 71.5% (113/158), and 91 surveys were analyzed. Most senior residents found the prehospital rotation either more beneficial or much more beneficial than other rotations regarding the acquisition of technical and non-technical skills. Anesthesiology residents reported less benefits than other residents regarding pharmacological knowledge acquisition and confidence as to their ability to manage emergency situations. Simulation studies should now be carried out to confirm these findings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urgent and Acute Prehospital Care)
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Open AccessArticle
Trends and Characteristics of Emergency Medical Services in Italy: A 5-Years Population-Based Registry Analysis
Healthcare 2020, 8(4), 551; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8040551 - 11 Dec 2020
Viewed by 429
Abstract
Background: Emergency Medical Services (EMS) plays a fundamental role in providing good quality healthcare services to citizens, as they are the first responders in distressing situations. Few studies have used available EMS data to investigate EMS call characteristics and subsequent responses. Methods: Data [...] Read more.
Background: Emergency Medical Services (EMS) plays a fundamental role in providing good quality healthcare services to citizens, as they are the first responders in distressing situations. Few studies have used available EMS data to investigate EMS call characteristics and subsequent responses. Methods: Data were extracted from the emergency registry for the period 2013–2017. This included call and rescue vehicle dispatch information. All relationships in analyses and differences in events proportion between 2013 and 2017 were tested against the Pearson’s Chi-Square with a 99% level of confidence. Results: Among the 2,120,838 emergency calls, operators dispatched at least one rescue vehicle for 1,494,855. There was an estimated overall incidence of 96 emergency calls and 75 rescue vehicles dispatched per 1000 inhabitants per year. Most calls were made by private citizens, during the daytime, and were made from home (63.8%); 31% of rescue vehicle dispatches were advanced emergency medical vehicles. The highest number of rescue vehicle dispatches ended at the emergency department (74.7%). Conclusions: Our data showed that, with some exception due to environmental differences, the highest proportion of incoming emergency calls is not acute or urgent and could be more effectively managed in other settings than in an Emergency Departments (ED). Better management of dispatch can reduce crowding and save hospital emergency departments time, personnel, and health system costs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urgent and Acute Prehospital Care)
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