Special Issue "Genetics and Genomics of Salmonid Fishes"

A special issue of Genes (ISSN 2073-4425). This special issue belongs to the section "Animal Genetics and Genomics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 July 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Daniel Macqueen
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
The Roslin Institute and Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK
Dr. Manu Kumar Gundappa
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
The Roslin Institute and Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
Dr. Diego Robledo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
The Roslin Institute and Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Salmonids are one of the most iconic fish lineages. In addition to playing a crucial role in global food and economic security, this family attracts the attention of conservation efforts and of scientists keen to understand its interesting life history and genome biology. This interest has driven forward impressive recent advancements in salmonid genetics and genomics, including reference genome sequences and high-resolution genotyping tools for many key species. Genomics is proving central to the improvement of farmed salmonid traits (e.g., disease resistance) through modern breeding programmes, leading to increased animal welfare and industrial stability, and is equally vital to investigate genetic structuring and adaptation of wild populations, guiding stock management decisions. While genome-wide SNP markers remain the current state of the art for salmonid genetic analyses, there is a growing recognition of the crucial role that larger structural variants can play in population differentiation. Functional genomics—including fast-developing approaches to probe epigenetic features—is further shedding light onto different aspects of salmonid biology and health, including immunity and host–pathogen interactions, nutrition, sexual maturation and smoltification. A genomic perspective is also vital to interrogate the genome rediploidization process following the salmonid whole-genome duplication event (‘Ss4R’), including the evolution of duplicated gene networks. Excitingly, precise genome editing methods in salmonids are maturing rapidly, opening up new avenues to rapidly study the genetic basis of salmonid phenotypes. This Special Issue aims to gather leading articles that advance our understanding of salmonid biology by exploiting genetics and genomics across the full breadth of interest areas.

Dr. Daniel Macqueen
Dr Manu Kumar Gundappa
Dr Diego Robledo
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Genes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Salmonidae
  • Aquaculture
  • Wild Salmonids
  • Whole Genome Duplication
  • Genetic variation
  • Tetraploidy
  • Genome Sequencing
  • Selective Breeding
  • Functional Genomics
  • Genome Editing
  • Genome Evolution
  • Phylogenetics
  • Immunogenomics
  • Nutrigenomics

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Gene Profiling in the Adipose Fin of Salmonid Fishes Supports Its Function as a Flow Sensor
Genes 2020, 11(1), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/genes11010021 - 23 Dec 2019
Abstract
In stock enhancement and sea-ranching procedures, the adipose fin of hundreds of millions of salmonids is removed for marking purposes annually. However, recent studies proved the significance of the adipose fin as a flow sensor and attraction feature. In the present study, we [...] Read more.
In stock enhancement and sea-ranching procedures, the adipose fin of hundreds of millions of salmonids is removed for marking purposes annually. However, recent studies proved the significance of the adipose fin as a flow sensor and attraction feature. In the present study, we profiled the specific expression of 20 neuron- and glial cell-marker genes in the adipose fin and seven other tissues (including dorsal and pectoral fin, brain, skin, muscle, head kidney, and liver) of the salmonid species rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and maraena whitefish Coregonus maraena. Moreover, we measured the transcript abundance of genes coding for 15 mechanoreceptive channel proteins from a variety of mechanoreceptors known in vertebrates. The overall expression patterns indicate the presence of the entire repertoire of neurons, glial cells and receptor proteins on the RNA level. This quantification suggests that the adipose fin contains considerable amounts of small nerve fibers with unmyelinated or slightly myelinated axons and most likely mechanoreceptive potential. The findings are consistent for both rainbow trout and maraena whitefish and support a previous hypothesis about the innervation and potential flow sensory function of the adipose fin. Moreover, our data suggest that the resection of the adipose fin has a stronger impact on the welfare of salmonid fish than previously assumed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Genetics and Genomics of Salmonid Fishes)
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