Feminist Genealogies: Specific Political Intersections

A special issue of Genealogy (ISSN 2313-5778).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (9 December 2019) | Viewed by 65325

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
School of Psychology, Te Kura Hinengaro Tangata Massey University, Palmerston North 4442, New Zealand
Interests: feminist theory; feminism and psychology; gender-based violence

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Guest Editor
School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Notre Dame Australia, Fremantle, WA 6160, Australia
Interests: critical theories; Foucauldian perspectives and narrative research

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Guest Editor
Te Kura Hinengaro Tangata, Manawatū Campus, Massey University, Palmerston North 4442, New Zealand
Interests: feminist theory; gendered social power relations; sexuality; violence

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Guest Editor
School of Psychology, Massey University, Palmerston North 4442, New Zealand
Interests: feminist care ethics; feminist methodologies; feminist theories of psychoanalysis

Special Issue Information

As a project of sociopolitical transformation, feminism of all kinds are engaged in practices of both critique and prefiguration: or, what has been called, the future perfect tense (Burman, 2016, p.710).

Dear Colleagues,

As we approach the third decade of the 21st Century, it is something of a truism to say that there are multiple feminisms.  A post-feminist sensibility (Gill, 2007) establishes contemporary currency for debating feminist sociopolitical activism, for mistaking feminist identities, for rejuvenating backlash or lamenting fragmentation.  This special issue aims to openly celebrate the multiplicity of feminist genealogical practices of critique and prefiguration, with respect for enabling tensions and productive problematics.

Our invitation for feminist genealogical writing accepts that there are no boundaries that clearly establish the historical trajectory of feminisms’ political emergence (which century? which women? which counter-movements, contests, continents could we count as feminist?). There are no borderlines delineating feminist subject-matter (who or what is at stake: women? gender? bodies? social hierarchies? human rights? liberation? freedom?). In this context, we aim to resist fabricating a totalising character for feminist genealogy, without foregoing recognisably feminist threads of subversion or disruption to trajectories of gendered social power relations. 

We imagine feminist genealogies as transdisciplinary research and writing that engages critical genealogical methods to “travel along rhizomatic pathways, searching for new vantage points… and offer[ing] new ways of seeing the present” (Meadmore, Hatcher, & McWilliam, 2000, p. 470).  We appreciate that some may embrace the “painstaking rediscovery of struggles together with the rude memory of their conflicts" (Foucault, 1980, p. 83) while others will initiate genealogy as “a force” storming the cannons of our disciplinary pasts to reconsider “the way we make sense” (Tamboukou, 2016, p. 116).  We also acknowledge that not all work we read as feminist genealogy explicitly takes up those terms.  We are mindful of projects like Salem’s (2016) theorising of intersectionality as traveling theory that reminds us of the “critical roots” that the concepts’ travels have erased; or Ferrando’s (2013) untangling of posthuman terminologies, including feminist new materialisms, through tracing movements of their emergence.  They seem to us to be the kind of implicitly genealogical projects that show “‘something  altogether  different’  behind  things:…  the  secret  that they  have  no  essence or  that  their  essence  was  fabricated  in  a piecemeal  fashion" (Foucault, 1984, p. 78).

Just as the journal Genealogy opens to multiple genealogical narratives and engagements with genealogical theories and methods, in this special issue we are inviting submissions of feminist transdisciplinary work including, but not limited to, engagements with:

  • genealogical methods
  • genealogical theory
  • local genealogical narratives
  • indigenous genealogies
  • genealogies of affect
  • genealogies of feminism, post-feminism
  • becoming feminist, genealogies
  • critical intersectionalities of feminism and genealogy

Prof. Dr. Mandy Morgan
Dr. Robbie Busch
Dr. Leigh Coombes
Dr. Ann Rogerson
Guest Editors

References

Burman, E. (2016). Fanon, Foucault, feminisms: Psychoeducation, theoretical psychology, and political change. Theory & Psychology, 26(6), 706–730. doi: 10.1177/0959354316653484

Ferrando, F. (2013). Posthumanism, transhumanism, antihumanism, metahumanism, and new materialisms. Existenz, 8(2), 26–32.

Foucault, M. (1980). Two lectures. In Power/knowledge: Selected interviews and other writings 1972-1977 (C. Gordon, Ed. & Trans.; L. Marshall, J. Mepham & K. Soper, Trans.; pp. 78-108). New York, NY: Harvester Wheatsheaf.

Foucault, M. (1984). Nietzsche, genealogy, history. In P. Rabinow (Ed.), The Foucault Reader. New York, NY: Pantheon.

Gill, R. (2007) ‘Postfeminist media culture. Elements of a sensibility’ European Journal of Cultural Studies, 10(2): 147-66.

Meadmore, D., Hatcher, C.,  & McWilliam, E. (2000). Getting tense about genealogy. Qualitative Studies in Education, 13, 463-476.

Tamboukou, M. (2016). Sewing, Fighting and Writing: Radical Practices in Work, Politics and Culture. London: Rowman & Littlefield International.

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Genealogy is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Feminist genealogy
  • Feminist theory
  • Genealogies of feminism
  • Becoming feminist
  • Local feminist genealogical narratives
  • Feminist genealogical methods
  • Critical intersectionalities of feminism and genealogy
  • Indigenous, feminist genealogies

Published Papers (9 papers)

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8 pages, 232 KiB  
Article
Reading Storylines of Religious Motherhood with Ethics of Joy
by Teija Rantala
Genealogy 2020, 4(3), 89; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy4030089 - 27 Aug 2020
Viewed by 2196
Abstract
In this article the storylines of a religious mother are read with Rosi Braidotti’s formulation of joyful and affirmative ethics. This ethics sets these storylines in motion and illuminates the changes that occur concerning devotion, resistance, and resilience in the face of the [...] Read more.
In this article the storylines of a religious mother are read with Rosi Braidotti’s formulation of joyful and affirmative ethics. This ethics sets these storylines in motion and illuminates the changes that occur concerning devotion, resistance, and resilience in the face of the expectations of religious motherhood. This diffractive reading makes explicit the changing affects functioning in non-normative narratives and the compound and polyvocal ethics of becoming concerning (religious) motherhood, reproduction, and sustenance in these troubling times—times which compel us to live within compassionate ethics. The ethics of joy brings forward affective elements by allowing also the negative affects entangled in pain and trauma to be recognised as resistance. Besides assisting in reading the storylines for possible breaks, turns, and changes, diffractive reading makes often-neglected tacit elements matter. The forces fuelling the movement in the storylines bring forth equally symmetries, disparities, and changes, and the complex but also complementary relation of resilience and resistance as a part of feminist genealogies of affect. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feminist Genealogies: Specific Political Intersections)
11 pages, 231 KiB  
Article
The First Generation of Japanese Women Psychologists
by Miki Takasuna
Genealogy 2020, 4(2), 61; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy4020061 - 21 May 2020
Viewed by 3521
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to characterize the first Japanese women psychologists, pre-WWII, as identified by their published work in psychological journals and by their conference presentations at meetings of the Japanese Psychological Association. From my archival survey, I collected data on [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to characterize the first Japanese women psychologists, pre-WWII, as identified by their published work in psychological journals and by their conference presentations at meetings of the Japanese Psychological Association. From my archival survey, I collected data on the education levels, degrees, marital status, and careers of eight women. Three earned PhDs from US universities; five earned BAs from national public universities. All eight psychologists found teaching jobs at colleges. As the centenary of the JPA draws near, this work calls attention for the need to integrate women into the pre-WWII history of psychology when the school system and matriculation prerequisites for women differed from men. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feminist Genealogies: Specific Political Intersections)
12 pages, 237 KiB  
Article
First Generation Feminist? Auto-Ethnographic Reflections on Politicisation and Finding a Home within Feminism
by Vikki Turbine
Genealogy 2019, 3(2), 33; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy3020033 - 21 Jun 2019
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3969
Abstract
In spite of the apparent rise in feminism, who gets to know about feminism is still fraught and impartial. How then, do we come to find ‘a home’ in and for feminism when it has been absent from our formative politicisation? How comfortable [...] Read more.
In spite of the apparent rise in feminism, who gets to know about feminism is still fraught and impartial. How then, do we come to find ‘a home’ in and for feminism when it has been absent from our formative politicisation? How comfortable is that home for working-class academics? In this paper, I reflect on my feminist genealogy—from growing up as a working-class girl in a small Scottish town in an area of deprivation to becoming a first generation feminist academic in a Russell Group University in the UK. This paper builds on the wealth of research exploring the trajectories of working-class women within academia by engaging genealogy research to explore how one develops as a feminist within academia—which can also be a strange place for first generation academics. As an undergraduate coming of age in the ‘post-feminist’ 1990s, access to the language and politics of feminism was beyond my grasp. I came to feminism relatively late in my life and academic career—it was in my doctoral research that I really became engaged academically and as a named political identity. I employ auto-ethnography in this paper and reflect on how our intimate others are always implicated in our own stories. This allows me to highlight how inherited experiences, memories, and embodiments are key. Intergenerational learning can make us implicitly feminist before we learn the formal language of feminism. The stories I choose to tell and ‘memories’ I invoke here are re-crafted and recalled in response to what frustrates me now. That young women are still telling the same stories that I tell here. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feminist Genealogies: Specific Political Intersections)
11 pages, 2747 KiB  
Article
Ellen-Maria Ekström and the Stories That Connect Us
by Cathy Richardson and Christina Löwenborg
Genealogy 2019, 3(2), 25; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy3020025 - 23 May 2019
Viewed by 3080
Abstract
In this article, Metis scholar and psychotherapist Cathy Richardson, together with Swedish psychotherapist, Christina Löwenborg, write about their family, their shared genealogy and their experience of connection and roots in what some might call feminist genealogy or feminist storytelling. This history spans four [...] Read more.
In this article, Metis scholar and psychotherapist Cathy Richardson, together with Swedish psychotherapist, Christina Löwenborg, write about their family, their shared genealogy and their experience of connection and roots in what some might call feminist genealogy or feminist storytelling. This history spans four generations, two continents and a cultural divide. The authors share a great-grandmother, Ellen-Maria Ekström, who lived in Småland in southern Sweden, from 1876–1951. In this paper, the authors explore the implications of being co-descendants of Ellen-Maria and the heritage—women’s knowledge that comes from their maternal relations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feminist Genealogies: Specific Political Intersections)
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11 pages, 241 KiB  
Article
Indigenous Relationality: Women, Kinship and the Law
by Patricia Dudgeon and Abigail Bray
Genealogy 2019, 3(2), 23; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy3020023 - 26 Apr 2019
Cited by 37 | Viewed by 32648
Abstract
Strong female governance has always been central to one of the world’s oldest existing culturally diverse, harmonious, sustainable, and democratic societies. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women’s governance of a country twice the size of Europe is based on complex laws which regulate [...] Read more.
Strong female governance has always been central to one of the world’s oldest existing culturally diverse, harmonious, sustainable, and democratic societies. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women’s governance of a country twice the size of Europe is based on complex laws which regulate relationships to country, family, community, culture and spirituality. These laws are passed down through generations and describe kinship systems which encompass sophisticated relations to the more-than-human. This article explores Indigenous kinship as an expression of relationality, culturally specific and complex Indigenous knowledge systems which are founded on a connection to the land. Although Indigenous Australian women’s kinships have been disrupted through dispossession from the lands they belong to, the forced removal of their children across generations, and the destruction of their culture, community and kinship networks, the survival of Indigenous women’s knowledge systems have supported the restoration of Indigenous relationality. The strengthening of Indigenous women’s kinship is explored as a source of social and emotional wellbeing and an emerging politics of environmental reproductive justice. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feminist Genealogies: Specific Political Intersections)
10 pages, 230 KiB  
Article
ResearchingWITH: Narratives and Crafts in Research in Psychology
by Marcia Moraes and Laura Cristina de Toledo Quadros
Genealogy 2019, 3(2), 14; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy3020014 - 1 Apr 2019
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2486
Abstract
In this paper, we share research narratives based on our practice as researchers. We understand that narrating, researching, and weaving are intertwined processes that lead us into peculiar and unpredictable actions in the research field. Therefore, researching is a risky practice. It entails [...] Read more.
In this paper, we share research narratives based on our practice as researchers. We understand that narrating, researching, and weaving are intertwined processes that lead us into peculiar and unpredictable actions in the research field. Therefore, researching is a risky practice. It entails unforeseen transformations and is both a craft and an ontological policy: If there is no given reality, what realities are performed along with our research practices? For what and to whom do we produce knowledge? We aim to discuss research policies that are in tune with local, contextualized, and embodied knowledge, and ways of doing research that consider the other—or the “object”—not as a passive target from whom you get information, but as an expert. Consequently, researching is understood as sharing expertise and as a reciprocal transformation device that activates all of those involved. We intend to share what has been produced by our research groups in Brazil. Our studies are intertwined as a network of connections and affectations and are guided by ResearchWith, which is a way of undertaking research that weaves WITH others and not ABOUT them. We emphasize this experience as a way of doing science in the feminine and we understand this as a craft. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feminist Genealogies: Specific Political Intersections)
13 pages, 625 KiB  
Article
Restoring the Feminine of Indigenous Environmental Thought
by Margaret Forster
Genealogy 2019, 3(1), 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy3010011 - 16 Mar 2019
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 7977
Abstract
A feminist genealogy approach to governmentality is used to explore how indigenous knowledge and aspirations related to the environment become embedded into Aotearoa New Zealand environmental policy and practice. Particular consideration is given to the indigenous feminine as an impetus for change as [...] Read more.
A feminist genealogy approach to governmentality is used to explore how indigenous knowledge and aspirations related to the environment become embedded into Aotearoa New Zealand environmental policy and practice. Particular consideration is given to the indigenous feminine as an impetus for change as expressed through atua wāhine/Māori female spiritual authority and powers. Political projects and activism by Māori, the indigenous people of Aotearoa New Zealand, provide the basis to explore contests between environmental truths that originate from Māori traditions and those that have come to dominate national environmental politics that originate from British “Western” traditions. It is argued that truth contests have been extremely effective at disrupting the power and authority of environmental policy and practice dominated by Western thought. Furthermore, efforts to maintain the momentum of these transformation and consolidate the authority and power of Māori communities is linked to rendering the indigenous feminine visible, retelling our herstories and developing new relationships and practices that give expression to atua. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feminist Genealogies: Specific Political Intersections)
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12 pages, 219 KiB  
Article
Leaking Women: A Genealogy of Gendered and Racialized Flow
by Michelle Fine
Genealogy 2019, 3(1), 9; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy3010009 - 20 Feb 2019
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3595
Abstract
Through a feminist and critical race analytic, this paper theorizes the disruptions evoked by leaky women—actually doubly leaky women—those whose nipples, peri-menopausal uterus’ and mouths have “leaked” in ways that rupture/stain/expose the white-patriarchal-capitalist enclosure of work, home and the streets and then dared [...] Read more.
Through a feminist and critical race analytic, this paper theorizes the disruptions evoked by leaky women—actually doubly leaky women—those whose nipples, peri-menopausal uterus’ and mouths have “leaked” in ways that rupture/stain/expose the white-patriarchal-capitalist enclosure of work, home and the streets and then dared to leak again by suing for justice in court. In a closing coda, I address the race/class policing dynamics between she who leaks and the “respectable” [usually white] women recruited to plaster up the hole and cauterize the leaker. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feminist Genealogies: Specific Political Intersections)

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2 pages, 144 KiB  
Book Review
Aimi Hamraie Building Access: Universal Design and the Politics of Disability
by Leola Meynell
Genealogy 2019, 3(1), 8; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy3010008 - 19 Feb 2019
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3338
Abstract
Aimi Hamraie’s Building Access: Universal Design and the Politics of Disability (University of Minnesota Press, 2017) critically traces the Universal Design movement in the United States, from its diverse inceptions in the mid-20th century to its broad applications today [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feminist Genealogies: Specific Political Intersections)
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