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Open AccessArticle

Indigenous Relationality: Women, Kinship and the Law

1
School of Indigenous Studies, The University of Western Australia, Crawley WA 6009, Australia
2
Independent Researcher, London N7 8AN, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Genealogy 2019, 3(2), 23; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy3020023
Received: 19 February 2019 / Revised: 13 April 2019 / Accepted: 23 April 2019 / Published: 26 April 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feminist Genealogies: Specific Political Intersections)
Strong female governance has always been central to one of the world’s oldest existing culturally diverse, harmonious, sustainable, and democratic societies. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women’s governance of a country twice the size of Europe is based on complex laws which regulate relationships to country, family, community, culture and spirituality. These laws are passed down through generations and describe kinship systems which encompass sophisticated relations to the more-than-human. This article explores Indigenous kinship as an expression of relationality, culturally specific and complex Indigenous knowledge systems which are founded on a connection to the land. Although Indigenous Australian women’s kinships have been disrupted through dispossession from the lands they belong to, the forced removal of their children across generations, and the destruction of their culture, community and kinship networks, the survival of Indigenous women’s knowledge systems have supported the restoration of Indigenous relationality. The strengthening of Indigenous women’s kinship is explored as a source of social and emotional wellbeing and an emerging politics of environmental reproductive justice. View Full-Text
Keywords: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kinship; kincentric ecology; relationality; Indigenous governance; social and emotional wellbeing; self-determination; Indigenous knowledge systems Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kinship; kincentric ecology; relationality; Indigenous governance; social and emotional wellbeing; self-determination; Indigenous knowledge systems
MDPI and ACS Style

Dudgeon, P.; Bray, A. Indigenous Relationality: Women, Kinship and the Law. Genealogy 2019, 3, 23.

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