Designing Gels for Wound Dressing

A special issue of Gels (ISSN 2310-2861). This special issue belongs to the section "Gel Applications".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2024 | Viewed by 2646

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
School of Chemical Engineering, Yeungnam University, 280 Daehak-ro, Gyeongsan-si 38541, Gyeongsangbuk-do, Republic of Korea
Interests: hydrogels; nanocomposite; tissue engineering; drug delivery; biopolymers

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Chemical Engineering, Yeungnam University, 280 Daehak-ro, Gyeongsan-si 38541, Gyeongsangbuk-do, Republic of Korea
Interests: nanobiotechnology; tissue engineering; nanomaterials; nanofabrication; microbiology; molecular biology; protein chemistry
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Chemical Engineering, Yeungnam University, 280 Daehak-ro, Gyeongsan-si 38541, Gyeongsangbuk-do, Republic of Korea
Interests: tissue engineering; nanoparticles; stem cell; biopolymer; toxicology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Currently, healthcare is facing a growing problem of traumatic wounds causing death. Skin is the major external defense system that protects the body from microbial infections and external environmental stressors. In developing countries, >90% of accidents cause skin injuries and subsequent deaths yearly. Molecules controlling inflammation and tissue repair are often associated with wound healing, and these factors’ dysregulation leads to mortality in wounded patients. To promote wound healing and skin tissue repair, effective wound dressing materials are active supplements to overcome the limitations of natural wound repair processes and to avoid scar formation. Hydrogels can be used as an active wound dressing material to enhance the repair process by maintaining optimal conditions for wound healing. The advantages of hydrogel dressings over conventional dressings are numerous. A topical application can help remove infected and necrotic tissue from dry wounds, scabs, and necrotic wounds and keep them clean.

Designing hydrogels with spatiotemporal regulation in the drug release for the wound-healing process is critical in wound management. As a multidisciplinary topic, this Special Issue will assist chemists, material scientists, engineers, and medical practitioners in understanding the benefits and limitations of hydrogels to build and create therapeutically beneficial biomaterial platforms for translational applications. It can also bring out the recent advances and novel methodologies in designing and developing active hydrogels to treat and heal wounds for cost-effective treatment. Furthermore, this field invites research on innovative functionalization chemistries, variable combinations/compositions of natural and synthetic hydrogels, introducing natural therapies, creating dynamic crosslinking chemistries, and fabricating multi-modal and intelligent hydrogels for wound management.

We gladly receive research and review articles relevant to the topics below, and other highly significant articles closely related to these topics are also welcome.

  • Novel crosslinking methods in designing hydrogels; 
  • 3D/4D-printed hydrogels for wound healing; 
  • Antibacterial hydrogels in wound dressing;
  • Biopolymer-based hydrogels in wound healing;
  • Metal nanocomposite hydrogels for wound healing;
  • Hydrogels for controlled drug delivery; 
  • Self-healing hydrogels for wound management;
  • Smart responsive hydrogels for specific wound healing;
  • Functional hydrogels for wound healing. 

Dr. Kuncham Sudhakar
Dr. Kannan Badri Badri Narayanan
Dr. Rakesh Bhaskar
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Gels is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • hydrogels
  • biopolymers
  • nanocomposite
  • antibacterial
  • wound healing
  • wound dressing
  • wound management

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

17 pages, 4288 KiB  
Article
Enhanced Hemostatic and Procoagulant Efficacy of PEG/ZnO Hydrogels: A Novel Approach in Traumatic Hemorrhage Management
by Chuyue Zhang, Yifan Wang, Yuan Xue, Junyao Cheng, Pengfei Chi, Zhaohan Wang, Bo Li, Taoxu Yan, Bing Wu and Zheng Wang
Gels 2024, 10(2), 88; https://doi.org/10.3390/gels10020088 - 24 Jan 2024
Viewed by 949
Abstract
Managing severe bleeding, particularly in soft tissues and visceral injuries, remains a significant challenge in trauma and surgical care. Traditional hemostatic methods often fall short in wet and dynamic environments. This study addresses the critical issue of severe bleeding in soft tissues, proposing [...] Read more.
Managing severe bleeding, particularly in soft tissues and visceral injuries, remains a significant challenge in trauma and surgical care. Traditional hemostatic methods often fall short in wet and dynamic environments. This study addresses the critical issue of severe bleeding in soft tissues, proposing an innovative solution using a polyethylene glycol (PEG)-based hydrogel combined with zinc oxide (ZnO). The developed hydrogel forms a dual-network structure through amide bonds and metal ion chelation, resulting in enhanced mechanical properties and adhesion strength. The hydrogel, exhibiting excellent biocompatibility, is designed to release zinc ions, promoting coagulation and accelerating hemostasis. Comprehensive characterization, including gelation time, rheological properties, microstructure analysis, and swelling behavior, demonstrates the superior performance of the PEG/ZnO hydrogel compared to traditional PEG hydrogels. Mechanical tests confirm increased compression strength and adhesive properties, which are crucial for withstanding tissue dynamics. In vitro assessments reveal excellent biocompatibility and enhanced procoagulant ability attributed to ZnO. Moreover, in vivo experiments using rat liver and tail bleeding models demonstrate the remarkable hemostatic performance of the PEG/ZnO hydrogel, showcasing its potential for acute bleeding treatment in both visceral and peripheral scenarios. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Designing Gels for Wound Dressing)
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16 pages, 5016 KiB  
Article
Polydopamine-Functionalized Bacterial Cellulose as Hydrogel Scaffolds for Skin Tissue Engineering
by Kannan Badri Narayanan, Rakesh Bhaskar, Kuncham Sudhakar, Dong Hyun Nam and Sung Soo Han
Gels 2023, 9(8), 656; https://doi.org/10.3390/gels9080656 - 14 Aug 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1360
Abstract
Bacterial cellulose (BC) is a natural polysaccharide polymer hydrogel produced sustainably by the strain Gluconacetobacter hansenii under static conditions. Due to their biocompatibility, easy functionalization, and necessary physicochemical and mechanical properties, BC nanocomposites are attracting interest in therapeutic applications. In this study, we [...] Read more.
Bacterial cellulose (BC) is a natural polysaccharide polymer hydrogel produced sustainably by the strain Gluconacetobacter hansenii under static conditions. Due to their biocompatibility, easy functionalization, and necessary physicochemical and mechanical properties, BC nanocomposites are attracting interest in therapeutic applications. In this study, we functionalized BC hydrogel with polydopamine (PDA) without toxic crosslinkers and used it in skin tissue engineering. The BC nanofibers in the hydrogel had a thickness of 77.8 ± 20.3 nm, and they could be used to produce hydrophilic, adhesive, and cytocompatible composite biomaterials for skin tissue engineering applications using PDA. Characterization techniques, namely Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), and Raman spectroscopy, were performed to investigate the formation of polydopamine on the BC nanofibers. The XRD peaks for BC occur at 2θ = 14.65°, 16.69°, and 22.39°, which correspond to the planes of (100), (010), and (110) of cellulose type Iα. Raman spectroscopy confirmed the formation of PDA, as indicated by the presence of bands corresponding to the vibration of aromatic rings and aliphatic C–C and C–O stretching at 1336 and 1567 cm−1, respectively. FTIR confirmed the presence of peaks corresponding to PDA and BC in the BC/PDA hydrogel scaffolds at 3673, 3348, 2900, and 1052 cm−1, indicating the successful interaction of PDA with BC nanofibers, which was further corroborated by the SEM images. The tensile strength, swelling ratio, degradation, and surface wettability characteristics of the composite BC biomaterials were also investigated. The BC/PDA hydrogels with PDA-functionalized BC nanofibers demonstrated excellent tensile strength and water-wetting ability while maintaining the stability of the BC fibers. The enhanced cytocompatibility of the BC/PDA hydrogels was studied using the PrestoBlue assay. Culturing murine NIH/3T3 fibroblasts on BC/PDA hydrogels showed higher metabolic activity and enhanced proliferation. Additionally, it improved cell viability when using BC/PDA hydrogels. Thus, these BC/PDA composite biomaterials can be used as biocompatible natural alternatives to synthetic substitutes for skin tissue engineering and wound-dressing applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Designing Gels for Wound Dressing)
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