Special Issue "Emerging Issues in Transport and Mobility"

A special issue of Future Transportation (ISSN 2673-7590).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 November 2023 | Viewed by 1119

Special Issue Editors

Transport Safety Research Centre, Loughborough University, Leicestershire LE11 3TU, UK
Interests: transport safety; human factors; driver behavior; vulnerable road user safety
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Transport Safety Research Centre, Loughborough University, Leicestershire LE11 3TU, UK
Interests: injury prevention; injury scaling; public transport; health impacts of transport and travel

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Road transport is rapidly developing. Automated technologies are offering the capability of improving the safety and mobility of vehicles whilst reducing environmental impacts, and it has been suggested that risky driving behaviour, errors, and ultimately, crashes, will be prevented by “taking the driver out of the loop”. Adaptive driving support and information facilities may improve the driving experience, enabling drivers to make better use of their time in routine situations, whilst automated traffic management offers the opportunity to manage road infrastructure much more efficiently, thereby providing improvements to mobility and the environment. However, some transport and mobility challenges remain outstanding. Many of these safety challenges involve human factors and driver behaviour, particularly when considering driver interaction with new vehicle information systems, usability/user acceptance and user experience.  Such issues are likely to become even more prevalent in the future due to the rapid global move towards vehicle automation. Therefore, this Special Issue offers readers an insight into some of the key emerging issues within transport and how human factor challenges associated with progress in these domains are being overcome. Key topics will include:

  • Vehicle automation.
  • Human–machine interaction. 
  • Vulnerable road user safety.
  • Driver state and fitness to drive.
  • Driver workload and task demand.
  • Interaction of (partly) automated vehicles with vulnerable road users.
  • Human factors in mixed traffic conditions.
  • Older drivers/novice drivers.
  • Health impacts of future transport and travel.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Prof. Dr. Andrew Morris
Dr. Jo Barnes
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Future Transportation is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • vehicle automation
  • human–machine interaction
  • vulnerable road user safety
  • driver state and fitness to drive
  • driver workload and task demand
  • interaction of (partly) automated vehicles with vulnerable road users
  • human factors in mixed traffic conditions
  • older drivers/novice drivers
  • health impacts of future transport and travel

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Comparing Enhanced Models for Evaluating the Economic Impact of Airports
Future Transp. 2023, 3(3), 1124-1146; https://doi.org/10.3390/futuretransp3030062 - 20 Sep 2023
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Abstract
Evaluating the economic impact of airports is crucial for understanding the benefits they bring to a region. However, when an area has more than one airport, it becomes essential to analyze each airport’s contribution to the local economy to make informed investment and [...] Read more.
Evaluating the economic impact of airports is crucial for understanding the benefits they bring to a region. However, when an area has more than one airport, it becomes essential to analyze each airport’s contribution to the local economy to make informed investment and policy decisions. Thus, studying economic models that can distinguish each airport’s impact on the region’s economy becomes essential. In this context, this paper aims to compare three different approaches to determine the economic contributions of airports in a given region and identify their social and economic benefits. The International Civil Aviation Organization recommends using input–output analysis in this context. The study considered three weight factors for the input–output basic model: circular buffer, displacement time, and Huff’s gravitational model. The analysis was performed using the three largest airports in São Paulo state, Brazil, due to their proximity and influence on the surrounding areas. The models were compared based on their efficiency and accuracy in reflecting the reality of the case study context. The study identified the most suitable model for establishing correlations between investments made in airport infrastructure and the generation of gross domestic product, employment, and added value. This study fills a gap in the existing literature by proposing improvements to the methods for evaluating airports’ economic and social benefits. In recent times, airport investors, both in the government and private sectors, have become increasingly demanding in their need for accurate analyses before making investments. Therefore, the results of this paper will provide valuable insights into the benefits of investing in airport infrastructure and help policymakers and investors make informed decisions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Issues in Transport and Mobility)
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Article
To Share or to Own? Understanding the Willingness to Adopt Shared and Owned Electric Automated Vehicles on Three Continents
Future Transp. 2023, 3(3), 1108-1123; https://doi.org/10.3390/futuretransp3030061 - 13 Sep 2023
Viewed by 284
Abstract
Electric automated vehicles (AVs) are expected to become part of the transportation system within the coming years. The implications of their implementation are still uncertain. What is known is that human behaviour will be central to determining AV adoption. This research aims to [...] Read more.
Electric automated vehicles (AVs) are expected to become part of the transportation system within the coming years. The implications of their implementation are still uncertain. What is known is that human behaviour will be central to determining AV adoption. This research aims to gain insight into how potential users of privately owned (PAVs) and shared (SAV) electric automated vehicles are characterised across three different continents assessing the influence of cultural and geographic features, personal attitudes and characteristics and the perceived advantages and disadvantages of AVs. Using survey data collected among residents (N = 1440) in Greater Sydney, Australia; Greater Montréal, Canada; and the Randstad, the Netherlands, this paper explores individuals’ willingness to adopt PAVs and SAVs using statistical descriptive analysis and logistic regression models. The study supports the impact of personal characteristics (e.g., age and travel characteristics) and attitudes towards personal and societal gains on the willingness to adopt AVs. Furthermore, this paper provides cross-continental evidence for the regional socio-urban context, affecting the desire to adopt AVs in different forms. Policy-makers should consider these factors and tailor different strategies according to cultural norms in order to motivate a coherent and sustainable implementation of AVs into existing and future mobility landscapes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Issues in Transport and Mobility)
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Article
Motivational Patterns and Personal Characteristics of Potential Carsharing Users: A Qualitative Analysis
Future Transp. 2023, 3(3), 1068-1084; https://doi.org/10.3390/futuretransp3030059 - 07 Sep 2023
Viewed by 362
Abstract
In the last decade, in Europe and the US, carsharing has become a mainstream transportation mode offering a sustainable solution to serious urban problems such as pollution, economic crisis, congestion, and parking. In Greece, carsharing is currently entering its commercial phase. Planners and [...] Read more.
In the last decade, in Europe and the US, carsharing has become a mainstream transportation mode offering a sustainable solution to serious urban problems such as pollution, economic crisis, congestion, and parking. In Greece, carsharing is currently entering its commercial phase. Planners and providers strive to gain an insight into the factors influencing the use of carsharing to effectively implement carsharing systems (CSS). In this context, understanding the motives and usage conditions are considered necessary. Based on a qualitative analysis (semi-constructed interviews, n = 52), this paper identifies motivational patterns as well as personal characteristics of potential users that can be further explored through quantitative research methods. During the data analysis process, participants’ responses were classified into categories that revealed not only the factors that motivated them but also unveiled the challenges they face when utilizing carsharing schemes. These factors were the following: familiarity, comfort, mindset, everyday life, usability, and economy. Next, these factors were analyzed further based on the personal characteristics of the respondents preparing the ground for quantitative research in future research initiatives. Notably, the present findings could be beneficial to operators, policymakers, and stakeholders endeavoring to appraise shared mobility schemes in Greece and Mediterranean countries in general. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Issues in Transport and Mobility)
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