Special Issue "Applications of Different Light Spectra in Growing Forest Tree Seedlings"

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Forest Ecophysiology and Biology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Johanna Riikonen
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Neulaniementie 5, 70200 Kuopio, Finland
Interests: forest tree species; LED lighting; nursery production; photobiology; plant physiology; year-round seedling production
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Light intensity and wavelength distribution and duration are amongst the most important factors affecting the success of plant production in different cultivation systems. Experiments conducted mostly on crop species but also on a smaller scale on forest tree species have shown that plant production and quality can be optimized by manipulating the spectral composition of light. However, the development of applications for enhancing seedling quality and production efficiency in forest tree nurseries by using different light spectra only began recently. For example, a growing interest in the year-round production of seedlings under controlled conditions has created a need for cost-efficient and environmental friendly cultivation protocols. The aim of this Special Issue of Forests is to increase our understanding of the role of light quality in seedling growth and development, and in this way to promote the development of new applications for production of healthy and vigorous seedlings. Manuscript submissions focusing on any aspect of using different light spectra in growing forest tree seedlings are welcome and encouraged.

Dr. Johanna Riikonen
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Forest tree species
  • Nursery production
  • Light quality
  • Spectral composition
  • Year-round production
  • Seedling quality

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Comparative Transcriptome Analyses of Gene Response to Different Light Conditions of Camellia oleifera Leaf Using Illumina and Single-Molecule Real-Time-Based RNA-Sequencing
Forests 2020, 11(1), 91; https://doi.org/10.3390/f11010091 (registering DOI) - 11 Jan 2020
Abstract
Camellia oleifera Abel. is a critical oil tree species. Camellia oil, which is extracted from the seeds, is widely regarded as a premium cooking oil, with the content of oleic acid being over 80%. Light is thought to be one of the largest [...] Read more.
Camellia oleifera Abel. is a critical oil tree species. Camellia oil, which is extracted from the seeds, is widely regarded as a premium cooking oil, with the content of oleic acid being over 80%. Light is thought to be one of the largest essential natural components in the regulation of plant developmental processes, and different light qualities can considerably influence plant physiological and phenotypic traits. In this research, we examined the growth and physiological responses of C. oleifera “MIN 43” cultivar plantlets to three different wavelengths of light, containing white, red, and blue light, and we utilized the combination of the PacBio single-molecule real-time (SMRT) and Illumina HiSeq RNA sequencing to obtain the mRNA expression profiles. The results showed that plantlets growing under blue light conditions displayed superior growth performance, including stimulated enhancement of the leaf area, increased leaf number, increased chlorophyll synthesis, and improved photosynthesis. Furthermore, SMAT sequencing created 429,955 reads of inserts, where 406,722 of them were full-length non-chimeric reads, and 131,357 non-redundant isoforms were produced. Abundant differentially expressed genes were found in leaves under different light qualities by RNA-sequencing. Gene expression profiles of actin, dynein, tubulin, defectively organized tributaries 3 (DOT3), and ADP ribosylation factor 5 (ARF5) were associated with the greatest leaf performance occurring under blue light conditions. Moreover, Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis identified hundreds of pathways involved in different light conditions. The pathways of the plant circadian rhythm and hormone signal transduction were associated with different light quality responses in C. oleifera. Phytochrome B (PHYB), constitutively photomorphogenic 1 (COP1), long hypocotyl 5 (HY5), auxin/indole-3-acetic acid (AUX/IAA), Gretchen Hagen 3 (GH3), and small auxin-up RNA (SAUR), which were differentially expressed genes involved in these two pathways, play a vital role in responses to different wavelengths of light in C. oleifera. In addition, blue light significantly promotes flavonoid biosynthesis via changing expression of related genes. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Growth, Nutrient Assimilation, and Carbohydrate Metabolism in Korean Pine (Pinus koraiensis) Seedlings in Response to Light Spectra
Forests 2020, 11(1), 44; https://doi.org/10.3390/f11010044 - 31 Dec 2019
Abstract
A need is growing to plant superior Korean pine (Pinus koraiensis Siebold & Zucc.) seedlings to cope with the degradation of secondary forests in Northeast Eurasia. The goal of this study was to detect the physiological effect on the quality of Korean [...] Read more.
A need is growing to plant superior Korean pine (Pinus koraiensis Siebold & Zucc.) seedlings to cope with the degradation of secondary forests in Northeast Eurasia. The goal of this study was to detect the physiological effect on the quality of Korean pine seedlings exposed to a range of spectra. One-year-old seedlings (n = 6) were cultured in three light-emitting diode (LED) spectra (69‒77 μmol m−2 s−1) of 13.9% red (R) + 77.0% green (G) + 9.2% blue (B) (R1BG5), 26.2% R + 70.2% G + 3.5% B (R2BG3), and 42.3% R + 57.3% G + 0.4% B (R3BG1). The spectrum of high-pressure sodium (HPS) lamps (43.9% R + 54.7% G + 1.5 B) was taken as the reference. Results showed that LED-lighting resulted in shorter seedlings with a greater diameter, shoot biomass, assessed quality, and sturdiness compared to those under the HPS-lighting. The R3BG1 spectrum reduced the shoot nitrogen (N) deficiency induced by the HPS spectrum, while the R1BG5 treatment induced a steady-state uptake of N and phosphorus (P) in whole-plant organs. The R1BG5 spectrum also resulted in a higher soluble sugar concentration and higher activities of glutamine synthetase and acid phosphatase in needles compared to the control. Seedlings in the R2BG3 spectrum had the highest concentrations of chlorophyll and soluble protein in the leaves. Overall, the R-high LED-spectrum could stimulate biomass accumulation in shoot, but meanwhile resulted in a P deficiency. Hence, the LED lighting in the R1BG5 spectrum is recommended to promote the quality of Korean pine seedlings. Full article
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