E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Disturbance Effects on Soil Carbon and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Forest Ecosystems"

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Forest Ecophysiology and Biology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Scott X. Chang

Department of Renewable Resources, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E3, Canada
Website | E-Mail
Interests: forest soil processes; forest fertilization and nutrition; carbon sequestration; greenhouse gas emissions; agroforestry
Co-Guest Editor
Dr. Yanjiang Cai

State Key Laboratory of Subtropical Silviculture, Zhejiang A & F University, Hangzhou 311300, China
E-Mail
Interests: soil carbon and nitrogen transformations and fluxes; management options towards greenhouse gas mitigation and climate change adaptation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Forest ecosystems are often disturbed by agents such as harvesting, fire, wind, insects and diseases, and acid deposition, with differing intensities and frequencies. Such disturbances can markedly affect the amount, form and stability of soil organic carbon in and the emission of greenhouse gases, including CO2, CH4, and N2O, from forest ecosystems. It is vitally important that we improve our understanding of the impact of different disturbance regimes on forest soil carbon and greenhouse gas emissions to guide our future research, forest management practices, and policy development. Through this special issue, we aim to bring together researchers working on different aspects of forest ecology to share their findings on disturbance effects on soil carbon and greenhouse gas emissions in forest ecosystems. Comparisons on disturbance effects can be made among biomes and climate regions.

Prof. Dr. Scott Chang
Dr. Yanjiang Cai
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Forests is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Carbon stability
  • Disturbance intensity
  • Frequency
  • Greenhouse gas emission
  • Microbial linkage
  • Soil-pant relationship

Published Papers (2 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-2
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Methane Emission from Mangrove Wetland Soils Is Marginal but Can Be Stimulated Significantly by Anthropogenic Activities
Forests 2018, 9(12), 738; https://doi.org/10.3390/f9120738
Received: 21 October 2018 / Revised: 21 November 2018 / Accepted: 22 November 2018 / Published: 27 November 2018
PDF Full-text (2988 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Mangrove wetland soils have been considered as important sources for atmospheric CH4, but the magnitude of CH4 efflux in mangrove wetlands and its relative contribution to climate warming compared to CO2 efflux remains controversial. In this study, we measured [...] Read more.
Mangrove wetland soils have been considered as important sources for atmospheric CH4, but the magnitude of CH4 efflux in mangrove wetlands and its relative contribution to climate warming compared to CO2 efflux remains controversial. In this study, we measured both CH4 and CO2 effluxes from mangrove soils during low or no tide periods at three tidal zones of two mangrove ecosystems in Southeastern China and collected CH4 efflux data from literature for 24 sites of mangrove wetlands worldwide. The CH4 efflux was highly variable among our field sites due to the heterogeneity of mangrove soil environments. On average, undisturbed mangrove sites have very low CH4 efflux rates (ranging from 0.65 to 14.18 μmol m−2 h−1; median 2.57 μmol m−2 h−1), often less than 10% of the global warming potentials (GWP) caused by the soil CO2 efflux from the same sites (ranging from 0.94 to 9.50 mmol m−2 h−1; median 3.67 mmol m−2 h−1), even after considering that CH4 has 28 times more GWP over CO2. Plant species, study site, tidal position, sampling time, and soil characteristics all had no significant effect on mangrove soil CH4 efflux. Combining our field measurement results and literature data, we demonstrated that the CH4 efflux from undisturbed mangrove soils was marginal in comparison with the CO2 efflux in most cases, but nutrient inputs from anthropogenic activities including nutrient run-off and aquaculture activities significantly increased CH4 efflux from mangrove soils. Therefore, CH4 efflux from mangrove wetlands is strongly influenced by anthropogenic activities, and future inventories of CH4 efflux from mangrove wetlands on a regional or global scale should consider this phenomenon. Full article
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Estimation of Forest Carbon Stocks for National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Reporting in South Korea
Forests 2018, 9(10), 625; https://doi.org/10.3390/f9100625
Received: 14 September 2018 / Revised: 4 October 2018 / Accepted: 5 October 2018 / Published: 10 October 2018
PDF Full-text (1970 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The development of country-specific emission factors in relation to the Agriculture, Forestry, and Other Land Use (AFOLU) sector has the potential to improve national greenhouse gas inventory systems. Forests are carbon sinks in the AFOLU that can play an important role in mitigating [...] Read more.
The development of country-specific emission factors in relation to the Agriculture, Forestry, and Other Land Use (AFOLU) sector has the potential to improve national greenhouse gas inventory systems. Forests are carbon sinks in the AFOLU that can play an important role in mitigating global climate change. According to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), signatory countries must report forest carbon stocks, and the changes within them, using emission factors from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) or from country-specific values. This study was conducted to estimate forests carbon stocks and to complement and improve the accuracy of national greenhouse gas inventory reporting in South Korea. We developed country-specific emissions factors and estimated carbon stocks and their changes using the different approaches and methods described by the IPCC (IPCCEF: IPCC default emission factors, CSFT: country-specific emission factors by forest type, and CSSP: country-specific emission factors by species). CSFT returned a result for carbon stocks that was 1.2 times higher than the value using IPCCEF. Using CSSP, CO2 removal was estimated to be 60,648 Gg CO2 per year with an uncertainty of 22%. Despite a reduction in total forest area, forests continued to store carbon and absorb CO2, owing to differences in the carbon storage capacities of different forest types and tree species. The results of this study will aid estimations of carbon stock changes and CO2 removal by forest type or species, and help to improve the completeness and accuracy of the national greenhouse gas inventory. Furthermore, our results provide important information for developing countries implementing Tier 2, the level national greenhouse gas inventory systems recommended by the IPCC. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Forests EISSN 1999-4907 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top