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Special Issue "Forest Carbon Dynamics under Changing Climate and Disturbance Regimes"

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Forest Ecology and Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Jagtar Bhatti

Northern Forestry Centre, Canadian Forest Service, Natural Resources Canada, Edmonton, AB T6H 3S5, Canada.
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Carbon, Forest productivity, peatlands, disturbances, climate change, nutrient cycling, greenhouse gases
Guest Editor
Dr. Kara L. Webster

Canadian Forest Service, Natural Resources Canada, Great Lakes Forestry Centre, Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, Canada.
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Soil biogeochemistry, hydrology, greenhouse gases, carbon, peatlands, forests

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Determining whether forest (both upland and lowland) are, have been, or will be a carbon source or sink is critical to improving our ability to predict changes in the carbon balance in forest ecosystems. Climate change may affect ecosystem productivity, allocation of aboveground versus belowground biomass and microbial populations and their activities. Under climate change scenarios of increasing temperature and changes in precipitation patterns, the standing biomass (aboveground carbon stock) would increase and soil carbon (SOC) would perturb various ecosystem processes, such as photosynthesis and autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration.

Forest carbon (C) is significantly affected by both natural and anthropogenic disturbances.  A natural disturbance can be a destructive event with drastic perturbations of an ecosystem, such as harvesting, fire, drought, insects and diseases, mining, seismic lines, and in-situ oil sand extraction, which could result in changes abiotic and biotic variables influencing the C distribution in different components of a forest ecosystem.  Both climate and disturbances also interact to influence latitudinal patterns of vegetation and C storage.  This Special Issue will examine the importance of forest C in the global carbon cycle; potential feedback on atmospheric CO2 concentration and climate change; improved both our knowledge of the amounts, spatial distributions and processes controlling C dynamics and our ability to predict changes in the terrestrial carbon balance.

Dr. Jagtar Bhatti
Dr. Kara L. Webster
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Forests is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • forest
  • carbon cycle
  • carbon dynamics
  • GHGs source and sink
  • anthropogenic disturbances
  • natural disturbances
  • climate change
  • forest productivity
  • litter fall rate
  • soil C changes

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Variability of Aboveground Litter Inputs Alters Soil Carbon and Nitrogen in a Coniferous–Broadleaf Mixed Forest of Central China
Forests 2019, 10(2), 188; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10020188
Received: 26 January 2019 / Revised: 19 February 2019 / Accepted: 20 February 2019 / Published: 20 February 2019
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Abstract
Global changes and human disturbances can strongly affect the quantity of aboveground litter entering soils, which could result in substantial cascading effects on soil biogeochemical processes in forests. Despite extensive reports, it is unclear how the variations in litter depth affect soil carbon [...] Read more.
Global changes and human disturbances can strongly affect the quantity of aboveground litter entering soils, which could result in substantial cascading effects on soil biogeochemical processes in forests. Despite extensive reports, it is unclear how the variations in litter depth affect soil carbon and nitrogen cycling. The responses of soil carbon and nitrogen to the variability of litter inputs were examined in a coniferous–broadleaf mixed forest of Central China. The litter input manipulation included five treatments: no litter input, natural litter, double litter, triple litter, and quadruple litter. Multifold litter additions decreased soil temperature but did not affect soil moisture after 2.5 years. Reductions in soil pH under litter additions were larger than increases under no litter input. Litter quantity did not affect soil total organic carbon, whereas litter addition stimulated soil dissolved organic carbon more strongly than no litter input suppressed it. The triggering priming effect of litter manipulation on soil respiration requires a substantial litter quantity, and the impacts of a slight litter change on soil respiration are negligible. Litter quantity did not impact soil total nitrogen, and only strong litter fluctuations changed the content of soil available nitrogen (nitrate nitrogen and ammonium nitrogen). Litter addition enhanced soil microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen more strongly than no litter input. Our results imply that the impacts of multifold litter inputs on soil carbon and nitrogen are different with a single litter treatment. These findings suggest that variability in aboveground litter inputs resulting from environmental change and human disturbances have great potential to change soil carbon and nitrogen in forest ecosystems. The variability of aboveground litter inputs needs to be taken into account to predict the responses of terrestrial soil carbon and nitrogen cycling to environmental changes and forest management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Forest Carbon Dynamics under Changing Climate and Disturbance Regimes)
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Open AccessArticle Exploring the Sensitivity of Subtropical Stand Aboveground Productivity to Local and Regional Climate Signals in South China
Forests 2019, 10(1), 71; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10010071
Received: 4 January 2019 / Revised: 10 January 2019 / Accepted: 15 January 2019 / Published: 18 January 2019
PDF Full-text (3876 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Subtropical forest productivity is significantly affected by both natural disturbances (local and regional climate changes) and anthropogenic activities (harvesting and planting). Monthly measures of forest aboveground productivity from natural forests (primary and secondary forests) and plantations (mixed and single-species forests) were developed to [...] Read more.
Subtropical forest productivity is significantly affected by both natural disturbances (local and regional climate changes) and anthropogenic activities (harvesting and planting). Monthly measures of forest aboveground productivity from natural forests (primary and secondary forests) and plantations (mixed and single-species forests) were developed to explore the sensitivity of subtropical mountain productivity to the fluctuating characteristics of climate change in South China, spanning the 35-year period from 1981 to 2015. Statistical analysis showed that climate regulation differed across different forest types. The monthly average maximum temperature, precipitation, and streamflow were positively correlated with primary and mixed-forest aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) and its components: Wood productivity (WP) and canopy productivity (CP). However, the monthly average maximum temperature, precipitation, and streamflow were negatively correlated with secondary and single-species forest ANPP and its components. The number of dry days and minimum temperature were positively associated with secondary and single-species forest productivity, but inversely associated with primary and mixed forest productivity. The multivariate ENSO (EI Niño-Southern Oscillation) index (MEI), computed based on sea level pressure, surface temperature, surface air temperature, and cloudiness over the tropical Pacific Ocean, was significantly correlated with local monthly maximum and minimum temperatures (Tmax and Tmin), precipitation (PRE), streamflow (FLO), and the number of dry days (DD), as well as the monthly means of primary and mixed forest aboveground productivity. In particular, the mean maximum temperature increased by 2.5, 0.9, 6.5, and 0.9 °C, and the total forest aboveground productivity decreased by an average of 5.7%, 3.0%, 2.4%, and 7.8% in response to the increased extreme high temperatures and drought events during the 1986/1988, 1997/1998, 2006/2007, and 2009/2010 EI Niño periods, respectively. Subsequently, the total aboveground productivity values increased by an average of 1.1%, 3.0%, 0.3%, and 8.6% because of lagged effects after the wet La Niña periods. The main conclusions of this study demonstrated that the influence of local and regional climatic fluctuations on subtropical forest productivity significantly differed across different forests, and community position and plant diversity differences among different forest types may prevent the uniform response of subtropical mountain aboveground productivity to regional climate anomalies. Therefore, these findings may be useful for forecasting climate-induced variation in forest aboveground productivity as well as for selecting tree species for planting in reforestation practices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Forest Carbon Dynamics under Changing Climate and Disturbance Regimes)
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Open AccessArticle Responses of Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration Potential and Bacterial Community Structure in Moso Bamboo Plantations to Different Management Strategies in Subtropical China
Forests 2018, 9(10), 657; https://doi.org/10.3390/f9100657
Received: 11 September 2018 / Revised: 16 October 2018 / Accepted: 19 October 2018 / Published: 20 October 2018
PDF Full-text (2924 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Moso bamboo is one of the fastest-growing plants in the world. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of converting secondary broadleaf evergreen forests (CK) to Moso bamboo plantations, and the impact of different management strategies, including no disturbance (M0), [...] Read more.
Moso bamboo is one of the fastest-growing plants in the world. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of converting secondary broadleaf evergreen forests (CK) to Moso bamboo plantations, and the impact of different management strategies, including no disturbance (M0), extensive management (M1), and intensive management (M2), on the soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration potential, and relevant characteristics of the soil bacterial community. Our results showed that, in comparison with CK, M0 and M1 had significantly higher SOC and recalcitrant organic materials (aliphatic and aromatic compounds), and a lower C mineralization rate, whereas M2 had the opposite effects. The conversion from CK to Moso bamboo plantation significantly decreased the relative abundance of Acidobacteria in both the topsoil and subsoil soil layers. Compared with CK, M0 led to the enrichment of bacteria such as Alphaproteobacteria, Chloroflexi, and Bacteroidetes, which are involved in the decomposition of organic matter and the formation of humus and are, therefore, potentially beneficial for increasing the SOC. Furthermore, the ratio of the microbial biomass C (MBC) to total organic C (TOC), C mineralization rate, and bacterial diversity increased from M0 to M2, i.e., with an increase in the disturbance intensity. These findings indicate that the conversion of secondary broadleaf forest to bamboo forest alter the soil bacterial community structure. Reducing disturbance in bamboo forest management strategies should be actively taken up to improve the SOC, and maintain sustainable development in the forest industry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Forest Carbon Dynamics under Changing Climate and Disturbance Regimes)
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