Special Issue "Advances in Glass Fibers"

A special issue of Fibers (ISSN 2079-6439).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 December 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Vladimír Čech

Institute of Materials Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Brno University of Technology, Purkynova 118, CZ-612 00 Brno, Czech Republic
Website | E-Mail
Interests: thin films; plasma technology; surface modification; interface/interphase phenomena.

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The recent development and wide-scale use of synthetic composites, particularly those containing fibers in a polymer matrix, has revolutionized materials usage and continues to accelerate. Composite materials may be selected to give unusual combinations of stiffness, strength, weight, high-temperature performance, corrosion resistance, hardness, or thermal and electrical conductivities. Weight reduction and corrosion resistance appear to be the most prominent current trends in the automotive industry, as well as in other industrial sectors such as construction, wind power, aerospace, and defense. It is generally accepted that fiber-reinforced composites are the most viable candidates for replacing structural steel and other metallic materials. An estimate of the total world market for composites is US$90 billion by 2020, with a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 7% to 9%. This market is dominated by glass reinforcement (87%) in unsaturated polyester (UP) resin (63%), which together comprises about 60% of the total volume. The annual tonnage of glass reinforcements is estimated to be about 5 million tonnes. At present, however, the use of glass fibers is much wider.

The scope of this Special Issue on “Advances in Glass Fibers” will be on various aspects relating to glass fibers (rovings, short fibers, fabrics, and hybrid fibers), not only in Glass Fiber Reinforced Plastics (GFRP), Glass Fiber Reinforced Concrete (GFRC), and their properties (mechanical, thermal), along with surface modification of fibers, model simulations, and interface/interphase phenomena, but also in filtration, biomedical, and dental applications.

Prof. Vladimír Čech
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Fibers is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 550 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Glass Fiber Reinforced Plastics (GFRP)
  • Glass Fiber Reinforced Concrete (GFRC)
  • Glass fiber processing
  • Surface modification
  • Interface/interphase phenomena
  • Model simulation
  • Mechanical properties
  • Thermal properties
  • Filtration
  • Biomedical and dental applications.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Investigation of Atmospheric Moisture during Heat Treatment of Glass Fibres
Fibers 2019, 7(4), 27; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib7040027
Received: 27 February 2019 / Revised: 19 March 2019 / Accepted: 20 March 2019 / Published: 1 April 2019
PDF Full-text (1544 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The tensile strength of single water-sized E-glass fibres that were thermally conditioned, either in air or under vacuum, was investigated. The vacuum removed water from the conditioning atmosphere, as well as the fibre surfaces, at room temperature but retained tensile strength of fibres [...] Read more.
The tensile strength of single water-sized E-glass fibres that were thermally conditioned, either in air or under vacuum, was investigated. The vacuum removed water from the conditioning atmosphere, as well as the fibre surfaces, at room temperature but retained tensile strength of fibres treated in the absence of water were not significantly different from those thermally conditioned in a standard air furnace. The results suggest that water, either in the treatment atmosphere or on the surface of the fibres, is not a significant factor in fundamental glass fibre strength loss at an elevated temperature. It may, therefore, be necessary to consider alternative theories to explain this strength loss. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Glass Fibers)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Dissolution Kinetics of R-Glass Fibres: Influence of Water Acidity, Temperature, and Stress Corrosion
Fibers 2019, 7(3), 22; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib7030022
Received: 11 February 2019 / Revised: 3 March 2019 / Accepted: 5 March 2019 / Published: 12 March 2019
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (3099 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Glass fibres slowly degrade due to dissolution when exposed to water. Such environmental aging results in the deterioration of the mechanical properties. In structural offshore and marine applications, as well as in the wind energy sector, R-glass fibre composites are continuously exposed to [...] Read more.
Glass fibres slowly degrade due to dissolution when exposed to water. Such environmental aging results in the deterioration of the mechanical properties. In structural offshore and marine applications, as well as in the wind energy sector, R-glass fibre composites are continuously exposed to water and humid environments for decades, with a typical design lifetime being around 25 years or more. During this lifetime, these materials are affected by various temperatures, acidity levels, and mechanical loads. A Dissolving Cylinder Zero-Order Kinetic (DCZOK) model was able to explain the long-term dissolution of R-glass fibres, considering the influence of the p H , temperature, and stress corrosion. The effects of these environmental conditions on the dissolution rate constants and activation energies of dissolution were obtained. Experimentally, dissolution was measured using High Resolution Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (HR-ICP-MS). For stress corrosion, a custom rig was designed and used. The temperature showed an Arrhenius-type influence on the kinetics, increasing the rate of dissolution exponentially with increasing temperature. In comparison with neutral conditions, basic and acidic aqueous environments showed an increase in the dissolution rates, affecting the lifetime of glass fibres negatively. External loads also increased glass dissolution rates due to stress corrosion. The model was able to capture all of these effects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Glass Fibers)
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Graphical abstract

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Aging Evaluation on Bearing Performances of Glass Fiber Composite Laminates in Salt Spray Fog Environment
Authors: L. Calabrese 1, V. Fiore 2, T. Scalici 3, A. Valenza 2
Affiliations:
1 University of Messina
2 Unversity of Palermo
3 Queen's University Belfast
Abstract: Aim of the present paper is to assess the bearing performance evolution of pinned glass composite laminates due to environment aging in salt spray fog tests. glass fibers/epoxy pinned laminates were exposed up to 60 aging days in salt-spray fog environmental conditions (according to ASTM B117 standard). In order to evaluate the relationship between mechanical failure mode and joint stability at increasing aging time, different single lap joints, changing hole diameter (D), laminate width (W), and hole free edge distance (E), where characterized at varying the aging steps. Based on this approach a property-structure relationship of these composite laminates was assessed on these critical environmental conditions. Furthermore an experimental 2D failure map, clustering main failure modes in the plane E/D versus W/D ratios, was generated and its clusters variation was analyzed at varying the aging exposition.

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