Special Issue "Brewing Yeast and Fermentation"

A special issue of Fermentation (ISSN 2311-5637). This special issue belongs to the section "Fermentation for Food and Beverages".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2023 | Viewed by 3806

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Vinko Krstanović
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Guest Editor
Josip Juraj Strossmayer University of Osijek, Faculty of Food Technology Osijek, F. Kuhača 20, 31000 Osijek, Croatia
Interests: fermentation; lactic acid bacteria; fermentation biotechnology; bioprocess engineering and fermentation technology; food microbiology; biotechnology industry
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Krešimir Mastanjević
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Food Technology, J.J. Strossmayer University of Osijek, F. Kuhača 20, 31 000 Osijek, Croatia
Interests: food contaminants; meat products; PAH’s; mycotoxins; malt
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Kristina Mastanjević
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Food Technology, Josip Juraj Strossmayer University of Osijek, F. Kuhača 20, 31000 Osijek, Croatia
Interests: brewing; beer; malt; malting; food contaminants
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is our pleasure to announce the launch of a new Special Issue of Fermentation on the topic of “Brewing Yeast and Fermentation”, with the aim of introducing novel and up-to-date fermentation methods and yeasts in brewing. When it comes to brewing, today’s interest in both the scientific community and industrial sector relies on innovation and applications of non-conventional yeast strains and genera. The Saccharomyces genera is no longer the only genera when it comes to beer-making. The application of different yeast can result in various aromas and tastes, non-alcoholic or low-alcoholic beer. A combination of yeast can also be a useful tool in brewing. Improvements in propagation and yeast growth methods are also an important part of the beer industry and brewing, which are interesting for scholars and professionals.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the genetics and biology of yeast metabolite controls, metabolite detection methods, yeast detection and quantification, growth and selection, the efficiency in industrial plants and processes, efficiency of strains and genera, application of new yeast in brewing.

Prof. Dr. Vinko Krstanović
Prof. Dr. Krešimir Mastanjević
Prof. Dr. Kristina Habschied
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Fermentation is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • yeast
  • brewing
  • fermentation
  • aromas
  • metabolites
  • growth
  • selection

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
Effects of the Addition of Dendrobium officinale on Beer Yeast Fermentation
Fermentation 2022, 8(11), 595; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation8110595 - 01 Nov 2022
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Abstract
Dendrobium officinale is a precious Chinese medicinal plant that is rich in polysaccharides, flavonoids, polyphenols, and other bioactive ingredients, and has a variety of biological activities. To explore the effects of D. officinale on the growth and metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, different [...] Read more.
Dendrobium officinale is a precious Chinese medicinal plant that is rich in polysaccharides, flavonoids, polyphenols, and other bioactive ingredients, and has a variety of biological activities. To explore the effects of D. officinale on the growth and metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, different concentrations (0, 10, 30, 50, and 100 g/L) of fresh D. officinale were added to the wort during the fermentation. The amount of yeast, alcohol content, reducing sugars, total acidity, pH, CO2 loss, and foam height were analyzed. Meanwhile, the glucose uptake, cell viability, key enzyme activity of yeast, total phenolics, antioxidant activity, volatile compounds, and consumer acceptance of brewed samples were also analyzed. The results showed that the growth and metabolism of yeast could be promoted by a suitable dosage of D. officinale but were inhibited at high dosage (100 g/L). The addition of D. officinale increased the activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase, while the highest concentration of D. officinale (100 g/L) decreased the glucose uptake and cell activity of the yeast. The contents of total phenolics and esters, along with the scavenging activity against ABTS radicals, were increased, indicating that the antioxidant activity and aromatic characteristics of beer would be improved by the addition of D. officinale. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Brewing Yeast and Fermentation)
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Article
Pseudo-Lager—Brewing with Lutra® Kveik Yeast
Fermentation 2022, 8(8), 410; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation8080410 - 19 Aug 2022
Viewed by 1037
Abstract
Brewers commonly produce ales since the ale yeast is more resilient, ferments quicker and requires higher temperatures, which are easier to ensure as opposed to lager and pilsner, which require lower temperatures and longer lagering time. However, Kveik yeasts are also resilient, ferment [...] Read more.
Brewers commonly produce ales since the ale yeast is more resilient, ferments quicker and requires higher temperatures, which are easier to ensure as opposed to lager and pilsner, which require lower temperatures and longer lagering time. However, Kveik yeasts are also resilient, ferment at fairly high temperatures (up to 35 °C), and can provide light, lager-like beers, but more quickly, in shorter lagering time, and with reduced off flavors. Diacetyl rest is not needed. The intention of this paper was to assess the possibility of producing pseudo-lager by using Lutra® Kveik. A batch (120 L) was divided into six fermenting vessels and inoculated with Lutra® yeast. To test its possibility to result in lager-like beer at higher temperature, we conducted fermentation at two temperatures (21 and 35 °C). Fermentation subjected to 21 °C lasted for 9 days, while at 35 °C, fermentation was finished in 2 days. After fermentation, both beers were stored in cold temperatures (4 °C) and then kegged, carbonized, and analyzed (pH, ethanol, polyphenols, color, bitterness, clarity). Alongside the sensory evaluation, a GC-MS analysis was also conducted in order to determine if there are any difference between the samples. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Brewing Yeast and Fermentation)
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Article
The Implications of Composite Dark Purple Rice Malt on Phenolic Acid Profiles, 4-Vinyl Guaiacol Reduction and Enhancing the Antioxidation of Beer
Fermentation 2022, 8(8), 392; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation8080392 - 15 Aug 2022
Viewed by 685
Abstract
This study highlights the dynamics of phenolic acids, antioxidation, and 4-vinylguaiacol in beer produced with dark purple rice malt, also known as Riceberry rice malt, as an adjunct and base malt. Riceberry rice malt substituted barley malt at 40% (w/w [...] Read more.
This study highlights the dynamics of phenolic acids, antioxidation, and 4-vinylguaiacol in beer produced with dark purple rice malt, also known as Riceberry rice malt, as an adjunct and base malt. Riceberry rice malt substituted barley malt at 40% (w/w), 60% (w/w), 80% (w/w), and 100% (w/w) with 100% (w/w) barley malt as the control. Two types of ale beer were produced with two yeasts, designated as POF and POF+. The wort produced with the Riceberry rice malt had higher anthocyanin and vanillic acids relative to all barley malt wort. Fermentation and beer maturation reduced phenolic acids and antioxidant activity in all treatment. Nevertheless, beer produced from 40% (w/w)–80% (w/w) Riceberry rice malt maintained higher p-coumaric acid, vanillic acid, anthocyanin, and antioxidant activity in beers with lower 4-vinylguaiacol relative to all barley malt beer, which also had higher ferulic acid and sinapic acid contents. The beers made from POF+ yeast contained more 4-vinylguaiacol contents than those found in beers made from POF yeasts. This study suggests that Riceberry rice malt or POF yeast are suitable raw materials for phenolic acid off-flavour reduction and the stabilisation of antioxidant activity in beer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Brewing Yeast and Fermentation)
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Article
A Comparative Study of Yeasts for Rosa roxburghii Wine Fermentation
Fermentation 2022, 8(7), 311; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation8070311 - 30 Jun 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 941
Abstract
Wine produced by fermentation of Chestnut rose (Rosa roxburghii) hips, known as cili (Chinese-Mandarin), in Guizhou province, and other places in China is becoming popular but there is limited knowledge of suitable yeast strains for its production. In this study, we [...] Read more.
Wine produced by fermentation of Chestnut rose (Rosa roxburghii) hips, known as cili (Chinese-Mandarin), in Guizhou province, and other places in China is becoming popular but there is limited knowledge of suitable yeast strains for its production. In this study, we first investigated the oenological properties of six commercial S. cerevisiae yeast strains (X16, F33, SH12, GV107, S102, RMS2), one commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. bayanus (S103), one commercial, non-Saccharomyces yeast strain, Torulaspora delbrueckii Prelude, and one indigenous S. cerevisiae strain, CZ, for cili wine fermentation. We measured the key traits of each of the yeast strains, viz., sulfite resistance, flocculation, hydrogen sulfide production capacity, fermentation rate, and yeast growth curves. Subsequently, we measured the resultant wine characteristics, viz., pH, alcohol content, residual sugar, titratable acidity, volatile acidity, ascorbic acid content and headspace volatile compounds. The overall suitability of each yeast type was evaluated using a multi-factor, unweighted, scorecard. On that basis, RMS2 was the most suitable, and closely followed by CZ and X16. This study is the first comparative evaluation of yeasts for cili wine production and provides a preliminary guide for their selection. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Brewing Yeast and Fermentation)
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