Trends and Innovations in Environmental Impact Assessment

A topical collection in Environments (ISSN 2076-3298).

Viewed by 5967

Editor


E-Mail Website
Collection Editor
CEris—Civil Engineering Research and Innovation for Sustainability, Department of Civil Engineering, Architecture and Georesources, Lisbon University, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1, 1049-001 Lisboa, Portugal
Interests: building energy; sustainable built environment; sustainable construction; life cycle assessment; energy life cycle; rehabilitation and sustainability
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

Environmental impact assessment (EIA) is one of the key processes in the preventive environmental approach and is mandatory in a wide range of countries and projects (e.g., agriculture, industry, commercial, services, infrastructures, urban projects, energy, tourism, and others). Environmental impact allows developers and decision makers to be preventive, identify the impact, define measures, and select alternatives to a full set of projects for better ecological and socio-economic integration and a support-integrated search for sustainable development. This topical collection invites research papers from various environmental impact issues to present articles emphasizing: (1) new trends, approaches, and cases of applications of environmental impact analysis; (2) project impact alternative selection; (3) defining environmental baseline (GIS and others) and environmental evolution without the project; (4) impact identification, prevision, and assessment; (5) integration of biodiversity, global warming, risk analysis, and other environmental factors; (6) feasibility analysis of environmental measures; (7) environmental public consultation and governance; (8) efficiency of environmental impact assessment processes; and (9) the link between strategical environmental assessment, environmental impact assessment, and sustainability. This environmental impact topical collection will provide an integrated view of trends and innovations in environmental impact.

Dr. Manuel Duarte Pinheiro
Collection Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the collection website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Environments is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • environmental impact trends
  • environmental impact assessment (EIA)
  • environment impact study (EIS)
  • impact methodology
  • impact cases innovation
  • environmental public consultation and governance
  • strategical environmental assessment (SEA)
  • sustainability

Published Papers (3 papers)

2024

Jump to: 2023

14 pages, 943 KiB  
Review
Assessing Ecological Gains: A Review of How Arthropods, Bats and Birds Benefit from Green Roofs and Walls
by Patrícia Tiago, Ana I. Leal and Cristina Matos Silva
Environments 2024, 11(4), 76; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments11040076 - 10 Apr 2024
Viewed by 317
Abstract
Because of the immense amount of infrastructure in cities, the introduction of vegetation into these constructions is expected to play a critical role in reducing the heat island effect, in mitigating the effects of climate change, and in supporting habitat connectivity and associated [...] Read more.
Because of the immense amount of infrastructure in cities, the introduction of vegetation into these constructions is expected to play a critical role in reducing the heat island effect, in mitigating the effects of climate change, and in supporting habitat connectivity and associated biodiversity. Although there is the perception that these solutions can improve the biodiversity of cities, their real value is still unclear. This paper focuses on two aspects of urban greening: green roofs and green walls. It provides a systematic review on biodiversity present in green roofs and walls, through an exhaustive worldwide literature analysis. Arthropods, bats, and birds were the three taxonomic groups analyzed in the papers included in our review. We observed a strong increase in the number of recent publications, thus demonstrating a growing interest in this topic. In summary, we found that green roofs/walls offered additional opportunities for plants and animals to thrive in urban environments because of habitat creation and greater spatial connectivity. In addition, the enhancement of other ecosystem services such as stormwater management and heat island mitigation was noted. By incorporating green features into urban design and planning, cities can support biodiversity while also improving the overall sustainability and livability of urban spaces. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

2023

Jump to: 2024

12 pages, 543 KiB  
Article
Environmental Impact Assessment of Plastic Waste Management Scenarios in the Canadian Context
by Ophela Zhang, Mahdi Takaffoli, Myriam Ertz and Walid Addar
Environments 2023, 10(12), 213; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments10120213 - 04 Dec 2023
Viewed by 2773
Abstract
Given the scale of plastic generation, its persistent presence in the environment, and the urgent need to transition to a net-zero emissions paradigm, managing plastic waste has gained increasing attention globally. Developing an effective strategy for plastic waste management requires a comprehensive assessment [...] Read more.
Given the scale of plastic generation, its persistent presence in the environment, and the urgent need to transition to a net-zero emissions paradigm, managing plastic waste has gained increasing attention globally. Developing an effective strategy for plastic waste management requires a comprehensive assessment of the potential benefits offered by different solutions, particularly with respect to their environmental impact. This study employs the life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology to evaluate the environmental impact of two alternative scenarios to the As-Is scenario for managing plastic waste in the province of British Columbia in Canada. The LCA results suggest that the Zero Plastic Waste scenario, which heavily relies on chemical recycling, may not inherently result in a reduced environmental footprint across all impact categories. This is notable when the focus is solely on end-of-life treatment processes, without considering the produced products and energy. The Intermediate scenario reduces the amount of plastic waste sent to landfills by directing more end-of-life plastic to mechanical recycling facilities. This scenario provides immediate benefits for resource conservation, with a minimal increase in the environmental burden resulting from treatment processes. Nonetheless, achieving a net-zero transition requires combining traditional and emerging recycling technologies. The current study could offer some guidance to policymakers on strategies for fostering more sustainable management of plastic waste. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

18 pages, 1332 KiB  
Article
Assessing the Environmental Impact of Eight Alternative Fuels in International Shipping: A Comparison of Marginal vs. Average Emissions
by Gustav Krantz, Christian Moretti, Miguel Brandão, Mikael Hedenqvist and Fritjof Nilsson
Environments 2023, 10(9), 155; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments10090155 - 06 Sep 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2111
Abstract
Global warming and other environmental concerns drive the search for alternative fuels in international shipping. A life-cycle analysis (LCA) can be utilized to assess the environmental impact of different fuels, thereby enabling the identification of the most sustainable alternative among the candidate fuels. [...] Read more.
Global warming and other environmental concerns drive the search for alternative fuels in international shipping. A life-cycle analysis (LCA) can be utilized to assess the environmental impact of different fuels, thereby enabling the identification of the most sustainable alternative among the candidate fuels. However, most LCA studies do not consider marginal emissions, which are important when predicting the effects of large-scale fuel transitions. The research purpose of this study was to assess the marginal emissions of several currently available marine fuels to facilitate the identification of the most promising marine fuel. Thus, marginal and average emissions for eight marine fuels (high-sulfur fuel oil, very-low-sulfur fuel oil, marine gas oil, liquified natural gas, biomethane, biomethanol, fossil methanol, and hydro-treated vegetable oil) were compared in terms of their environmental impact. Non-intuitively, the results indicate that biofuels exhibit equally or higher marginal greenhouse gas emissions than conventionally used fuel oils (162–270 versus 148–174 kg CO2/MJ propulsion), despite their significantly lower average emissions (19–73 vs. 169–175 kg CO2/MJ). This discrepancy is attributed to the current limited availability of climate-efficient biofuels. Consequently, a large-scale shift to biofuels cannot presently yield substantial reductions in the shipping industry’s climate impact. Additional measures, such as optimized trading routes, more energy-efficient ships, and research on more climate-friendly biofuels and electro-fuels, are thus required to significantly reduce the climate footprint of shipping. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop