Special Issue "Environmental Monitoring of Pollutants"

A special issue of Environments (ISSN 2076-3298).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 December 2020) | Viewed by 9547

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Anita Giglio
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biology, Ecology and Earth Science, University of Calabria, 87036 Rende, Italy
Interests: biodiversity in agroecosystem; coleoptera; immune system; microscopy; morphological and functional adaptation of insects; pollutants
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Attilio Naccarato
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Atmospheric Pollution of the National Research Council of Italy (IIA-CNR), Division of Rende, 87100 Cosenza, Italy
Interests: analytical chemistry; sample preparation; microextraction techniques; method optimization; environmental analytical chemistry
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Anthropogenic activities can introduce organic and inorganic xenobiotic contaminants into the lithosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere that often have a significant impact at different levels of biological organization. Pollutants can directly or indirectly affect organisms that provide ecosystem services in the food web as primary and secondary consumers or decomposers. Tolerance, adaptation, and sublethal or lethal responses of organisms to pollutant exposure are closely related to their trophic level, physiological properties, and life stage. Moreover, the effects of chemicals depend on the application rate and the level of uptake, persistence, volatilization, metabolization and bioavailability of the active ingredient. Chemical analyses in the environmental matrices, bioassay methods for the evaluation of toxic effects in field, semi-field, and laboratory experiments, and biological responses at organism, population, or community levels are fundamental tools for assessing the environmental quality. In this context, the increasing number of monitoring programs and the identification of new pollutants has been directing research towards the development of user-friendly analytical strategies with low environmental impact.

In this Special Issue, we invite colleagues to contribute with original research papers and review articles addressing recent advances on all aspects of environmental pollution and mitigation measures related to ecosystem and human health.

Dr. Anita Giglio
Dr. Attilio Naccarato
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Environments is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • emerging pollutants
  • environmental monitoring
  • bioindicators
  • biomarkers
  • ecotoxicological effects

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Vehicular Emission: Estimate of Air Pollutants to Guide Local Political Choices. A Case Study
Environments 2020, 7(5), 37; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments7050037 - 16 May 2020
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2702
Abstract
The aim of this case study was to show how, with the use of software, is it possible to carry out a preventive screening of vehicular emissions. Moreover, thanks to this preliminary analysis, some areas that are potentially polluted can be identified in [...] Read more.
The aim of this case study was to show how, with the use of software, is it possible to carry out a preventive screening of vehicular emissions. Moreover, thanks to this preliminary analysis, some areas that are potentially polluted can be identified in advance and suitable samplings on small-scale on them would help to verify the effectiveness of policies that can be adopted for the reduction of pollution. To this end, this paper reports a case study on vehicle traffic pollution in Calabria, a region in the south of Italy. We used the methodology called Corinair (Coordination Information AIR), developed by the EEA (European Environment Agency) and uses the software Copert4 (Computer Program to calculate Emission from Road Traffic). The total emissions per area were analyzed and the emissions for particular pollutants per unit area (km²) and per citizen were considered. The obsolete vehicles determined a substantial impact on the local atmospheric pollution. It was demonstrated how it is possible to substantially reduce the pollution of an area by adopting policies that encourage, for example, through tax concessions, the replacement of old cars of private citizens. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Monitoring of Pollutants)
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Article
Pine Stands as Bioindicators: Justification for Air Toxicity Monitoring in an Industrial Metropolis
Environments 2020, 7(4), 28; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments7040028 - 07 Apr 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2659
Abstract
Five permanent sample plots (SPs; 200–250 trees per plot) were established in middle-aged high-grade suburban pine stands near the industrial city of Krasnoyarsk, Siberia, Russia. Needle damage, inventory parameters of the stands, and the defense response of the stem phloem were evaluated annually [...] Read more.
Five permanent sample plots (SPs; 200–250 trees per plot) were established in middle-aged high-grade suburban pine stands near the industrial city of Krasnoyarsk, Siberia, Russia. Needle damage, inventory parameters of the stands, and the defense response of the stem phloem were evaluated annually for the years 2002–2019 and attributed to acute or chronic toxic exposures (creeping fire or industrial pollutants, respectively). The results form a basis for using trees as bioindicators. A newly elaborated stem lesion test was formed from a hypothesis on the upward sugar transport for the regeneration of an injured crown, based on Eschrich’s model of bidirectional sugar transport in the phloem. The formation of a phloem lesion was induced by inoculation of the stem with a mycelial extract of the ophiostomatoid fungus Ceratocystis laricicola. The lesion length and its shift relative to the inoculation hole were measured. An increase in the length of needles at early stages of stand weakening by pollutants was found to correspond to the hormesis model (Selye’s adaptation syndrome). A possibility of assessing the chronology of pollutant toxicity and the duration of the recovery period after creeping fire was shown. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Monitoring of Pollutants)
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Article
Estimation of the Discharge of Sunscreens in Aquatic Environments of the Mexican Caribbean
Environments 2020, 7(2), 15; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments7020015 - 20 Feb 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 3813
Abstract
Tourist growth in Quintana Roo, Mexico has brought with it an increase of pollution by sunscreens to aquatic ecosystems, which represents an environmental risk because of the chemical components of sunscreens that can negatively affect human health and aquatic ecosystems. However, the magnitude [...] Read more.
Tourist growth in Quintana Roo, Mexico has brought with it an increase of pollution by sunscreens to aquatic ecosystems, which represents an environmental risk because of the chemical components of sunscreens that can negatively affect human health and aquatic ecosystems. However, the magnitude of pollution in aquatic environments is unknown. Consequently, we sought to estimate the contamination by sunscreens based on usage and tourism statistics. Our estimate indicates that the water in Quintana Roo will receive nearly 4367.25 tons of chemicals from sunscreens used by residents and tourists over a period of 18 years (2007 to 2025). On average, each tourist stays in Quintana Roo for 3.45 days, and 89.9% of these visitors apply sunscreen, although only the 83.7% engage in water activities. Additionally, 30.4% of residents engage in water activities for an average of 1.5 days/year. We considered direct sunscreen contaminant contamination, which occurs from the application of sunscreen and subsequent water activities, as well as indirect contamination, which occurs when people wash their skin with drinking water that then enters the drainage system. Our analysis indicated that the greatest contribution of sunscreen to the karst aquifer of Quintana Roo, is direct. Chemicals dissolved in water are a danger to aquatic life and human health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Monitoring of Pollutants)
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