Special Issue "Entropy, Nonlinear Dynamics, and Methods of Complex Systems in Earthquake Physics including Precursory Phenomena II"

A special issue of Entropy (ISSN 1099-4300).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Nicholas Vassiliou Sarlis
Website
Guest Editor
Section of Solid State Physics, Department of Physics, School of Science, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografos, 157 84 Athens, Greece
Interests: solid state physics; thermodynamics of point defects; complex systems physics; nonlinear dynamics; physics of earthquakes; heart rate variability; natural time analysis
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

During the last decade, considerable progress has been made towards the understanding of preseismic processes. In this direction, the physics of critical phenomena, information entropy, and methods of complex systems have been applied for the study of rupture in the solid Earth crust.

From another point of view, during the 21st century, many very strong earthquakes have taken place (e.g., the 2011 M9.1 Tohoku, the 2004 M9.0 Sumatra, Andaman, or the 2010 M8.8 Chile earthquakes). Since the instrumentation in our days is much better than that of the previous century, the study of various physical (or geophysical) observables before these earthquakes may provide useful precursory signals. When combined with and studied within the aforementioned frame of modern methods, such signals may lead to more efficient earthquake prediction methods than ever before.

The scope of this Special Issue is to strengthen and present the most recent attempts in both theoretical and experimental methods to understand the physics of earthquakes and, hence, foresee their occurrence.

Prof. Dr. Nicholas V Sarlis
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Entropy is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Earthquakes
  • Rupture
  • Seismicity
  • Entropy
  • Nonlinear dynamics
  • Complex systems
  • Time series analysis
  • Natural time analysis
  • Electromagnetic phenomena
  • Earthquake prediction
  • Earthquake forecasting
  • Applications

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Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Exploring Changes in Land Surface Temperature Possibly Associated with Earthquake: Case of the April 2015 Nepal Mw 7.9 Earthquake
Entropy 2020, 22(4), 377; https://doi.org/10.3390/e22040377 - 26 Mar 2020
Abstract
Satellite thermal infrared remote sensing has received worldwide attention in the exploration for earthquake precursors; however, this method faces great controversy. Obtaining repeatable phenomena related to earthquakes is helpful to reduce this controversy. In this paper, a total of 15 or 17 years [...] Read more.
Satellite thermal infrared remote sensing has received worldwide attention in the exploration for earthquake precursors; however, this method faces great controversy. Obtaining repeatable phenomena related to earthquakes is helpful to reduce this controversy. In this paper, a total of 15 or 17 years of Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)/Aqua and MODIS/Terra satellite remote sensing land surface temperature (LST) products is selected to analyze the temperature changes before and after the Mw 7.9 earthquake in Nepal on 25 April 2015 and to explore possible thermal information associated with this earthquake. Major findings are given as follows: (1) from the time course, the temperature slowly cooled before the earthquake, reached a minimum at the time of the earthquake, and returned to normal after the earthquake. Since these changes were initiated before the earthquake, they may even have been precursors to the Nepal earthquake. (2) From the space distribution, the cooling areas correspond to the seismogenic structure during the earthquake. These cooling areas are distributed along the Himalayas and are approximately 1300 km long. The widths of the East and West sides are slightly different, with an average temperature decrease of 5.6 °C. For these cooling areas, the Western section is approximately 90 km wide and 500 km long; the East side is approximately 190 km wide and 800 km long. The Western side of the cooling strips appeared before the earthquake. In short, these kinds of spatial and temporal changes are tectonically related to the earthquake and may have been caused by the tectonic activity associated with the Nepal earthquake. This process began before the earthquake and therefore might even be potentially premonitory information associated with the Nepal earthquake. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Gravity Wave Activity in the Stratosphere before the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake as the Mechanism of Lithosphere-atmosphere-ionosphere Coupling
Entropy 2020, 22(1), 110; https://doi.org/10.3390/e22010110 - 16 Jan 2020
Abstract
The precursory atmospheric gravity wave (AGW) activity in the stratosphere has been investigated in our previous paper by studying an inland Kumamoto earthquake (EQ). We are interested in whether the same phenomenon occurs or not before another major EQ, especially an oceanic EQ. [...] Read more.
The precursory atmospheric gravity wave (AGW) activity in the stratosphere has been investigated in our previous paper by studying an inland Kumamoto earthquake (EQ). We are interested in whether the same phenomenon occurs or not before another major EQ, especially an oceanic EQ. In this study, we have examined the stratospheric AGW activity before the oceanic 2011 Tohoku EQ (Mw 9.0), while using the temperature profiles that were retrieved from ERA5. The potential energy (EP) of AGW has enhanced from 3 to 7 March, 4–8 days before the EQ. The active region of the precursory AGW first appeared around the EQ epicenter, and then expanded omnidirectionally, but mainly toward the east, covering a wide area of 2500 km (in longitude) by 1500 km (in latitude). We also found the influence of the present AGW activity on some stratospheric parameters. The stratopause was heated and descended; the ozone concentration was also reduced and the zonal wind was reversed at the stratopause altitude before the EQ. These abnormalities of the stratospheric AGW and physical/chemical parameters are most significant on 5–6 March, which are found to be consistent in time and spatial distribution with the lower ionospheric perturbation, as detected by our VLF network observations. We have excluded the other probabilities by the processes of elimination and finally concluded that the abnormal phenomena observed in the present study are EQ precursors, although several potential sources can generate AGW activities and chemical variations in the stratosphere. The present paper shows that the abnormal stratospheric AGW activity has also been detected even before an oceanic EQ, and the AGW activity has obliquely propagated upward and further disturbed the lower ionosphere. This case study has provided further support to the AGW hypothesis of the lithosphere-atmosphere-ionosphere coupling process. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
A Comparative Study of Geoelectric Signals Possibly Associated with the Occurrence of Two Ms > 7 EQs in the South Pacific Coast of Mexico
Entropy 2019, 21(12), 1225; https://doi.org/10.3390/e21121225 - 15 Dec 2019
Abstract
During past decades, several studies have suggested the existence of possible seismic electric precursors associated with earthquakes of magnitude M>7. However, additional analyses are needed to have more reliable evidence of pattern behavior prior to the occurrence of a big [...] Read more.
During past decades, several studies have suggested the existence of possible seismic electric precursors associated with earthquakes of magnitude M > 7 . However, additional analyses are needed to have more reliable evidence of pattern behavior prior to the occurrence of a big event. In this article we report analyses of self-potential Δ V records during approximately two years in three electro-seismic stations in Mexico located at Acapulco, Guerrero; Petatlán, Guerrero and Pinotepa Nacional, Oaxaca. On 18 April 2014 an M s 7.2 earthquake occurred near our Petatlán station. Our study shows two notable anomalies observed in the behavior of the Fourier power spectrum of Δ V for ultra low frequency ULF-range, and the transition of the α l -exponent of the detrended fluctuation analysis of the Δ V time series from uncorrelated to correlated signals. These anomalies lasted approximately three and a half months before the main shock. We compare this electric pattern with another electric signal we reported associated with an M s 7.4 that occurred on 14 September 1995 at Guerrero state, Mexico. Our characterization of the anomalies observed in both signals point out similar features that enrich our knowledge about precursory phenomena linked to the occurrence of earthquakes of magnitude M > 7 . Full article
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

1. Prof. Nicholas Sarlis, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens

2. Prof. Filippos Vallianatos, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens

3. Prof. Toshiyasu Nagao, Tokai University

 

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