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Special Issue "Innovation in Grid Connection and Control of Offshore Renewable Energy Systems"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "A3: Wind, Wave and Tidal Energy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (25 February 2022) | Viewed by 8340
Please submit your paper and select the Journal "Energies" and the Special Issue "Innovation in Grid Connection and Control of Offshore Renewable Energy Systems" via: https://susy.mdpi.com/user/manuscripts/upload?journal=energies. Please contact the journal editor Adele Min ([email protected]) before submitting.

Special Issue Editor

1. Offshore Renewable Energy, TECNALIA, Basque Research and Technology Alliance (BRTA), Parque Tecnológico de Bizkaia, 48160 Derio, Spain
2. Department of Automatic Control and Systems Engineering, University of The Basque Country (UPV), 48013 Bilbao, Spain
3. Joint Research Lab on Offshore Renewable Energy (JRL-ORE), 48013 Bilbao, Spain
Interests: power electronics; control strategies; grid connection; offshore renewable energy; wind turbines; wave energy converters

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

There is increasing interest in offshore renewable energies to harvest the energy available in oceans, but there are still many technological barriers to overcome. Offshore wind capacity is set to increase by at least 15-fold worldwide by 2040, while, ocean energy, which focuses mainly on wave and tidal energy, is said to have a global market potential of 337 GW of installed capacity in 2050 and would power 10% of Europe’s power consumption.

Effective controls are needed for the optimization of energy production, and are also essential in the improvement of reliability and can help to lengthen the remaining life of the devices. In the near future, large amounts of energy will need to be transmitted across long distances in the sea, and the power extracted from such variable resources represents a challenge in terms of grid compatibility. The use of energy storage solutions along with the control strategy can be useful to improve power quality. There are relatively few well-established regulations to follow, as some of the reference documents are still at a draft stage, but grid codes will soon include specific requirements for offshore renewable systems.

This Special Issue of Energies is dedicated to ‘Innovation in Grid Connection and Control of Offshore Renewable Energy Systems’ (fixed and floating offshore wind, wave and tidal). Recent research in offshore wind has demonstrated that classical onshore control strategies are not suitable for floating offshore wind turbines, and, therefore, papers exploring new alternatives are encouraged.

Topics of interest for publication include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Wave energy conversion
  • Tidal energy conversion
  • Fixed and floating offshore wind energy conversion
  • Multi-energy platform concepts and control
  • Electric power generation, conversion, storage and transmission
  • Modeling and simulation of offshore renewable generation
  • Integration of offshore renewable energy into the power system
  • Development of digital models of an offshore renewable energy facility and components
  • Control strategies of offshore renewable energy devices
  • Remaining life extension

The launch of this Special Issue is linked to the following activities:

1. The Joint Research Laboratory on Offshore Renewable Energy (JRL-ORE), is a scientific community made up of researchers from different institutions aiming to increase the level of the research results in terms of their impact in the business world and society in general regarding offshore renewable energies.

http://jrl-ore.com/

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2. The Master in Renewable Energy in the Marine Environment (REM) is an Erasmus Mundus Joint Master Degree (EMJMD) offered by four universities: University of the Basque Country (Coordinator), University of Strathclyde (UK), Norwegian University of Science and Technology, École Centrale de Nantes (France), which is co-funded by the Erasmus+ Programme of the European Union. Members of the JRL-ORE are involved in the teaching of the courses.

https://www.master-rem.eu/

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3. The VII Marine Energy Conference that will be held in Bilbao next November 10th, will try to find a common ground between research and industry needs in the field of offshore renewable energy in the Basque Country. It is a meeting point between students, researchers, and companies.

http://jrl-ore.com/vii-marine-energy-conference-will-be-held-on-november-10th/

4. We will organize the European Wave and Tidal Energy Conference in 2023. More details in the future.

http://jrl-ore.com/bilbao-will-host-ewtec-in-2023/)

Published papers will receive special diffusion through our social media.

If you are interested in contributing to this Special Issue, please feel free to let me know.

Dr. Eider Robles Sestafe
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • offshore renewable energy
  • power electronics
  • grid connection
  • grid integration
  • offshore wind turbines
  • wave energy converters
  • tidal energy converters
  • energy conversion
  • energy transmission
  • energy storage
  • offshore renewable testing
  • control
  • remaining life extension
  • digital models

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
A Simplified Modeling Approach of Floating Offshore Wind Turbines for Dynamic Simulations
Energies 2022, 15(6), 2228; https://doi.org/10.3390/en15062228 - 18 Mar 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1683
Abstract
Currently, floating offshore wind is experiencing rapid development towards a commercial scale. However, the research to design new control strategies requires numerical models of low computational cost accounting for the most relevant dynamics. In this paper, a reduced linear time-domain model is presented [...] Read more.
Currently, floating offshore wind is experiencing rapid development towards a commercial scale. However, the research to design new control strategies requires numerical models of low computational cost accounting for the most relevant dynamics. In this paper, a reduced linear time-domain model is presented and validated. The model represents the main floating offshore wind turbine dynamics with four planar degrees of freedom: surge, heave, pitch, first tower fore-aft deflection, and rotor speed to account for rotor dynamics. The model relies on multibody and modal theories to develop the equation of motion. Aerodynamic loads are calculated using the wind turbine power performance curves obtained in a preprocessing step. Hydrodynamic loads are precomputed using a panel code solver and the mooring forces are obtained using a look-up table for different system displacements. Without any adjustment, the model accurately predicts the system motions for coupled stochastic wind–wave conditions when it is compared against OpenFAST, with errors below 10% for all the considered load cases. The largest errors occur due to the transient effects during the simulation runtime. The model aims to be used in the early design stages as a dynamic simulation tool in time and frequency domains to validate preliminary designs. Moreover, it could also be used as a control design model due to its simplicity and low modeling order. Full article
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Article
Dispatchability, Energy Security, and Reduced Capital Cost in Tidal-Wind and Tidal-Solar Energy Farms
Energies 2021, 14(24), 8504; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14248504 - 16 Dec 2021
Viewed by 2394
Abstract
The global tidal energy resource for electricity generation is small, and converting tidal kinetic energy to electricity is expensive compared to solar-photovoltaic or land-based wind turbine generators. However, as the renewable energy content in electricity supplies grows, the need to stabilise these supplies [...] Read more.
The global tidal energy resource for electricity generation is small, and converting tidal kinetic energy to electricity is expensive compared to solar-photovoltaic or land-based wind turbine generators. However, as the renewable energy content in electricity supplies grows, the need to stabilise these supplies increases. This paper describes tidal energy’s potential to reduce intermittency and variability in electricity supplied from solar and wind power farms while lowering the capital expenditure needed to improve dispatchability. The paper provides a model and hypothetical case studies to demonstrate how sharing energy storage between tidal stream power generators and wind or solar power generators can mitigate the level, frequency, and duration of power loss from wind or solar PV farms. The improvements in dispatchability use tidal energy’s innate regularity and take account of tidal asymmetry and extended duration low-velocity neap tides. The case studies are based on a national assessment of Australian tidal energy resources carried out from 2018 to 2021. Full article
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Article
Addressing European Ocean Energy Challenge: The DTOceanPlus Structured Innovation Tool for Concept Creation and Selection
Energies 2021, 14(18), 5988; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14185988 - 21 Sep 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1506
Abstract
The whole energy system requires renewables that scale and produce reliable, valuable energy at an acceptable cost. The key to increasing the deployment of ocean energy is bringing down development and operating costs. This paper proposes a structured approach to innovation in ocean [...] Read more.
The whole energy system requires renewables that scale and produce reliable, valuable energy at an acceptable cost. The key to increasing the deployment of ocean energy is bringing down development and operating costs. This paper proposes a structured approach to innovation in ocean energy systems that would spur innovation and expand the market for ocean energy. This approach can be used by a wide range of stakeholders—including technology and project developers and investors—when considering creating or improving designs. The Structured Innovation design tool within the DTOceanPlus suite is one of a kind beyond the current state-of-the-art. It enables the adaptation and integration of systematic problem-solving tools based on quality function deployment (QFD), the theory of inventive thinking (TRIZ), and the failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) methodologies for the ocean energy sector. In obtaining and assessing innovative concepts, the integration of TRIZ into QFD enables the designers to define the innovation problem, identifies trade-offs in the system, and, with TRIZ as a systematic inventive problem-solving methodology, generates potential design concepts for the contradicting requirements. Additionally, the FMEA is used to assess the technical risks associated with the proposed design concepts. The methodology is demonstrated using high-level functional requirements for a small array of ten tidal turbines to improve the devices layout and power cabling architecture. The Structured Innovation design tool output comprises critical functional requirements with the highest overall impact and the least organisational effort to implement, along with appropriate alternative solutions to conflicting requirements. Full article
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Article
Scottish Islands Interconnections: Modelling the Impacts on the UK Electricity Network of Geographically Diverse Wind and Marine Energy
Energies 2021, 14(11), 3175; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14113175 - 28 May 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1688
Abstract
To meet climate change goals, the decarbonisation of the UK electricity supply is crucial. Increased geographic diversity and resource use could help provide grid and market stability and reduce CO2 intensive balancing actions. The main purpose of this research is to investigate [...] Read more.
To meet climate change goals, the decarbonisation of the UK electricity supply is crucial. Increased geographic diversity and resource use could help provide grid and market stability and reduce CO2 intensive balancing actions. The main purpose of this research is to investigate the impact of geographic diversity and Scottish island renewable energy on the UK network. This has been done by using the energy market modelling software PLEXOS with results validated using data for 2017/18. The model considers spatial diversification and forecasting errors by modelling day-ahead and intra-day markets with nodes for each distribution network operator region and island group. It was concluded that Scottish island renewable capacity could have a stabilising effect on the variability of renewables in terms of electricity generated, prices and forecasting errors, from the timescale of the entire year down to hours. The ability of geographically diverse generators to receive a higher price for electricity generated was shown to decrease with increased island capacity. Instances of negative prices were reduced with supply diversity (wind and marine) but not geographic diversity. Day ahead errors showed most clearly the impact of diversity of supply, particularly given the predictability of tidal stream generation. Full article
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