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Integration of Energy, Health and Comfort: Towards a Sustainable Building Stock

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "G: Energy and Buildings".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2023) | Viewed by 3234

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
INEGI - Instituto de Ciência e Inovação em Engenharia Mecânica e Engenharia Industrial, Campus da FEUP, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias 400, 4200-465 Porto, Portugal
Interests: sustainable energy systems; energy planning; energy policy; local climate action

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
INEGI-Instituto de Ciência e Inovação em Engenharia Mecânica e Engenharia Industrial, Campus da FEUP, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias 400, 4200-465 Porto, Portugal
Interests: indoor environmental quality; air pollution; source apportionment; exposure and risk assessment; ventilation; risk mitigation strategies
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
INEGI - Instituto de Ciência e Inovação em Engenharia Mecânica e Engenharia Industrial, Campus da FEUP, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias 400, 4200-465 Porto, Portugal
Interests: sustainable energy systems; energy planning; indoor environmental quality; energy-water-land-climate nexus

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

The relevance of buildings for the achievement of global climate and energy goals has been widely recognised, at both the national and the international level, leading to the setting of ambitious sectoral targets and the establishment of dedicated policies. The desired transition comprises, on the one hand, new challenges for buildings with the integration of new technologies and different energy carriers and the increasing decentralisation of energy systems. On the other hand, recent policies (such as the new Energy Performance Buildings Directive and related documents) provide new opportunities to look at buildings in a comprehensive manner, integrating energy and non-energy issues and moving towards a truly sustainable building stock. This will involve a holistic concept of building performance where the use of energy and GHG emissions will need to be assessed along with the indoor environmental quality (including health and comfort indicators), as well as the smartness and ability to provide flexibility services to the system. Finally, considering the inevitable impacts of climate change, buildings also need to be resilient to potential climate changes and ensure adequate living conditions for the most vulnerable populations—even under extreme circumstances. This Special Issue aims to encourage researchers to address these issues and contribute to the achievement of a truly sustainable building stock by 2050.

Dr. Isabel Azevedo
Dr. Marta Gabriel
Dr. Zenaida Mourão
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • buildings performance
  • NZEBs
  • indoor environmental quality
  • occupants’ health
  • EU building renovation roadmaps
  • smart services for buildings
  • digital twinning
  • vulnerable households

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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20 pages, 319 KiB  
Article
Opportunities for Promoting Healthy Homes and Long-Lasting Energy-Efficient Behaviour among Families with Children in Portugal
by Marta Fonseca Gabriel, João Pedro Cardoso, Fátima Felgueiras, Joana Azeredo, David Filipe, Peter Conradie, Stephanie Van Hove, Zenaida Mourão, Filippos Anagnostopoulos and Isabel Azevedo
Energies 2023, 16(4), 1872; https://doi.org/10.3390/en16041872 - 14 Feb 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1260
Abstract
Energy poverty vulnerability constitutes a significant concern in Portugal, with 17.5% of the population being unable to keep their home adequately warm. Furthermore, there is evidence that a substantial number of children live in unhealthy homes. This study aims to comprehensively characterise a [...] Read more.
Energy poverty vulnerability constitutes a significant concern in Portugal, with 17.5% of the population being unable to keep their home adequately warm. Furthermore, there is evidence that a substantial number of children live in unhealthy homes. This study aims to comprehensively characterise a sample of 101 Portuguese families with children and their homes in order to identify opportunities for actions for promoting long-lasting energy efficiency and environment health-promoting behavioural changes. To accomplish this aim, two tools—a building survey checklist and a questionnaire to participants—were developed and implemented to collect harmonised data on building-specific characteristics and on participants’ socioeconomic status and behaviour. The home visits for recruitment and data collection were conducted from July 2021 to April 2022. The results suggest that, for the population under study, the main opportunities for improvement include: (i) replacing low energy-efficient technologies, with high emission rates, namely those used for heating purposes, with cleaner and more efficient alternatives; (ii) providing citizens with detailed information about their home’s energy use and indoor air quality and (iii) educating the population on the best-practices for reducing indoor air stuffiness, mitigating the risk of hazardous exposures, improving thermal comfort and saving energy. Full article

Review

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22 pages, 2968 KiB  
Review
Linking Indoor Thermal Comfort with Climate, Energy, Housing, and Living Conditions: Portuguese Case in European Context
by João Delgado, Ana Mafalda Matos and Ana Sofia Guimarães
Energies 2022, 15(16), 6028; https://doi.org/10.3390/en15166028 - 19 Aug 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1545
Abstract
Even though the milder climate scenario and constant evolution of thermal building regulation are in light of European initiatives, in Portugal, there are few houses where occupants can remain all the time in perfectly comfortable temperature conditions without resorting to heating or cooling. [...] Read more.
Even though the milder climate scenario and constant evolution of thermal building regulation are in light of European initiatives, in Portugal, there are few houses where occupants can remain all the time in perfectly comfortable temperature conditions without resorting to heating or cooling. According to the Long Term Strategy for the Renewal of Buildings (ELPRE), this results from the combination of several factors, namely, low energy use for air conditioning compared to energy needs and aged building stock with poor energy performance. In fact, around 70% of the dwellings currently certified have low energy efficiency (C or less). The purpose of this review article was to analyse and discuss the factors affecting indoor thermal comfort, the inability to keep the home adequately warm in winter and cool in summer, and the risk of poverty or social exclusion in the European context, namely in Portugal. It fills the gap in the literature researching and analysing the motivations for these lower consumptions in Southern Europe, being Portugal a paradigmatic case. The current work integrates the indoor thermal comfort evolution and the current situation in Portugal in the EU context through different thermal comfort indicators and linking with the other statistics data, which may impact the indoor thermal comfort. Full article
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