Special Issue "Advanced Technologies for Energy Exploitation of Coals 2021"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "Geo-Energy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 June 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Manoj Khandelwal
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
School of Engineering, Information Technology and Physical Sciences, Federation University, Ballarat VIC 3353, Australia
Interests: rock engineering, rock blasting, soft computing, ground control, coal technology
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. P.G. Pathegama Ranjith
Website
Guest Editor
Deep Earth Energy Laboratory, Department of Civil Engineering, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia
Interests: geomechanics; CO2 sequestration; shale gas; coal seam gas; geotherml energy
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Energy, water, and food are three major elements to ensure human existence. The whole world has entered into a new historical period, where clean and low-carbon energy is undoubtedly required. Coal is definitely an indispensable source of energy necessary for the techno-economic progress of any country. The burning of coal releases numerous nitrous, carobon, and sulphur oxides vis-à-vis organic and inorganic compounds, which are hazardous for the environment. It is a fact that these emissions result in air contamination, including climate change and local acid rain problems. Coal has been widely studied by various researchers to explore the possibilities of economical and eneviormentally friendly energy sources, and viable metals. Coal has also been used comprehensively to fabricate new nanomaterials in laboratories, as well as waste treatment and clean-coal technologies. Thus, this Special Issue aims to encourage researchers to address the technological advancements that have led to more efficient combustion of coal with reduced emissions of sulphur, carbon, and nitrogen oxide. We are looking for contributions in the following areas:

  1. Coal as sustiabnle energy sources;
  2. Underground coal gassifications;
  3. Advanced coal mining technology.
Dr. Manoj Khandelwal
Prof. Dr. P.G. Pathegama Ranjith
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Energy 
  • Coal 
  • Environmental hazards 
  • Gasification 
  • Mining 
  • Sustainability

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Enrichment of Nb-Ta-Zr-W-Li in the Late Carboniferous Coals from the Weibei Coalfield, Shaanxi, North China
Energies 2020, 13(18), 4818; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13184818 - 15 Sep 2020
Abstract
Mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of coals provide crucial information on their potential clean, efficient, and integrated utilization. In this paper, the mineralogical and geochemical behaviors of the No. 5 coals of the Taiyuan Formation in the Weibei Coalfield, North China, were investigated, and [...] Read more.
Mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of coals provide crucial information on their potential clean, efficient, and integrated utilization. In this paper, the mineralogical and geochemical behaviors of the No. 5 coals of the Taiyuan Formation in the Weibei Coalfield, North China, were investigated, and their geological controlling factors were subsequently discussed. The minerals in the Weibei coals mainly consist of kaolinite (8.3%), calcite (5.0%), and pyrite (3.1%), with minor proportions of tobelite (2.9%), dolomite (1.7%), quartz (1.8%), and traces of siderite (0.4%) and gypsum (0.6%). Several critical elements, including Nb (19.8 mg/kg), Ta (3.6 mg/kg), Zr (71.0 mg/kg) and Li (32.3 mg/kg), occur at concentrations higher than those averages for world hard coals, making the Weibei coals potential sources of these critical elements. Several factors, terrigenous material, seawater invasion, and hydrothermal fluids are responsible for these mineralogical and geochemical characteristics. The L-type rare earth elements and yttrium (REE-Y) enrichment in the roofs and partings, Al2O3-TiO2 and Zr/TiO2-Nb/Y plots, and negative Eu and weak negative Ce anomalies in the Weibei coals indicate a felsic-intermediate dominated sediment provenance primarily derived from the Qilian-Qinling Oldland on the South. Marine bioclastic limestone, negative Ce and positive Y anomalies in coals imply the influence of seawater on the Weibei coals. Last but not least, the cleat-infilling and/or fracture-infilling calcite, pyrite, barite, and tobelite as well as the positive Eu and Gd anomalies, H-type, and M-type REE-Y enrichment patterns suggest the influence of hydrothermal fluids, which lead to re-distribution of some critical elements from roof and parting to the underlying coal seam. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Technologies for Energy Exploitation of Coals 2021)
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