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Energy and Environmental Economics/Policy

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "C: Energy Economics and Policy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 August 2023) | Viewed by 7447

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Spanish and International Economics, Econometrics and History and Economic Institutions, University of Castilla-La Mancha, 02071 Albacete, Spain
Interests: measurement of intellectual capital at the business and macroeconomic level; regional analysis; divergent growth models; knowledge management and business information systems; quality of life
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Guest Editor
Department Business Administration, University of Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real, Spain
Interests: accounting; intellectual capital; capital intangibles; audits; management control

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Guest Editor
Department of Political Economy and Public Finance, Economic and Business Statistics and Economic Policy, University of Castilla-La Mancha, 02071 Albacete, Spain
Interests: statistical process control; intellectual capital; sustainable tourism; agrarian economy; happiness measurement

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

An economic paradigm shift has occurred as a result of environmental economics, sustainability and energy efficiency in the face of climate change, and citizens consider this a key factor in determining their quality of life. In this context, in this Special Issue, we aim to scientifically disseminate high-quality papers pertaining to energy and environmental policies on global and local scales. We welcome papers that utilize quantitative methods linked to the analysis of real data. Although we will consider a variety of approaches, this Special Issue focuses on:

  1. Macro-studies on changes in the energy market, new energy mix with renewables, new green energies and economic power, EU energy mix and import dependency, changes in the producer market and the effects of the Russian–Ukrainian war.
  2. The energy market and new methods of state financing through green taxes. Taxes on energy, transport, pollution and resources can help us to reach our environmental policy goals, more sustainable industry and greener habits.
  3. Tourism has environmental, economic and social impacts. Thus, it is important to minimize the negative environmental impacts through the development of sustainable tourism. This is an objective of several policies, such as goal 8 of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, which aims to devise and implement policies to promote sustainable tourism that creates jobs and promotes local culture and products.
  4. Studies in the business field on information and the measurement and verification of corporate social responsibility, specifically regarding sustainability and the environment (social and environmental accounting).
  5. Sustainability has been identified as a factor that determines quality of life in "smart" cities and rural areas. It should provide an efficient balance between economic and residential systems, and the environment should undergo sustainable growth and provide improved quality of life for citizens. The planning and management of cities from this perspective leads to 'smart' development, which is also transmissible to rural areas.

Prof. Dr. Victor Raul Lopez-Ruiz
Prof. Dr. Domingo Nevado Pena
Prof. Dr. José Luis Alfaro Navarro
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • energy mix
  • green taxes
  • sustainable tourism
  • environmental accounting
  • climate change
  • quality of life

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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23 pages, 506 KiB  
Article
The Economic Importance of Offshore Wind Energy Development in Poland
by Agnieszka Brelik, Piotr Nowaczyk and Katarzyna Cheba
Energies 2023, 16(23), 7766; https://doi.org/10.3390/en16237766 - 25 Nov 2023
Viewed by 982
Abstract
The European Union’s climate policy aims to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 55% by 2030 and to achieve climate neutrality by 2050. One of the instruments for achieving these climate goals is the development of offshore wind energy. Unfortunately, Poland, as one of [...] Read more.
The European Union’s climate policy aims to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 55% by 2030 and to achieve climate neutrality by 2050. One of the instruments for achieving these climate goals is the development of offshore wind energy. Unfortunately, Poland, as one of the few European Union countries with access to the sea, does not have offshore wind farms yet. The purpose of this article is to determine the importance of offshore wind energy for the development of Poland based on the example of two sea regions: the West Pomeranian and Pomeranian Voivodeships. This article uses the input–output method to determine the economic effects of offshore wind power. The region’s share in the supply chain was determined based on the location of the offshore wind energy sector. A comparative analysis with the Saint-Brieuc offshore wind farm in France made it possible to show the differences between the studied locations. The supply chain share of the regions surveyed was 2.28% and 6.00% in the CAPEX phase and 5.98% and 8.23% in the OPEX phase. The annual average global value in the CAPEX phase at the country level was EUR 2793 million, and at the regional level, EUR 243 million and EUR 663 million. In the OPEX phase, the corresponding values are EUR 2106 million, EUR 223 million and EUR 663 million. The average annual employment in the CAPEX phase at the national level amounted to 26,323 jobs and at the regional level, 1953 and 5804. In the OPEX phase, employment amounted to 4790, 558 and 751 jobs, respectively. On the other hand, the average annual value added in the CAPEX phase at the national level was EUR 1221 million, and at the regional level, it was EUR 106 million and EUR 290 million. In the OPEX phase, it was EUR 920 million, EUR 97 million and EUR 239 million, respectively. While not all of the findings are conclusive, in general, the domestic offshore wind industry has weaker economic linkages and lower wage levels than the location adopted for comparison. It uses more labour-intensive economic sectors with lower OPEX value added. The results of the analyses presented in this paper are of crucial importance not only for Poland, as their advantage is the possibility to present, from an economic point of view, the profitability of this type of investment in general. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy and Environmental Economics/Policy)
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26 pages, 5384 KiB  
Article
Specialization Patterns for the Development of Renewable Energy Generation Technologies across Countries
by Adriana Grigorescu, Victor Raul Lopez Ruiz, Cristina Lincaru and Elena Condrea
Energies 2023, 16(20), 7164; https://doi.org/10.3390/en16207164 - 19 Oct 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1441
Abstract
Renewable energy is a global priority, as it addresses the goals of carbon neutrality and plays an important role in reshaping energy mixes. The shift from fossil fuels to renewable energy sources (solar, photovoltaic, geothermal, hydropower, wind, and biomass) must be performed without [...] Read more.
Renewable energy is a global priority, as it addresses the goals of carbon neutrality and plays an important role in reshaping energy mixes. The shift from fossil fuels to renewable energy sources (solar, photovoltaic, geothermal, hydropower, wind, and biomass) must be performed without negatively affecting economic growth or our quality of life. Renewable energy-generating technologies (patents) and their implementation (commercialization and usage) play essential roles, as they are the main steps in the process of the transition from conventional to emerging technologies. The decreased usage of fossil fuels, the objectives of the European Green Deal, and other constraints have pushed countries to seek innovative solutions. Depending on the available resources, these solutions involve a wide variety of approaches and may involve the emergence of specific patterns. This study addresses the identification of the cross-country features of specialization patterns in developing renewable energy generation technologies. The methods used are the analysis of the evolution of patent numbers with country fractional value, the application of the Herfindahl–Hirschman Index to renewable energy generation, and the use of the multivariate clustering spatial statistics tool combined with spatial representation. The findings show the differences between countries at the global level and, more specifically, at the EU level, by clustering the countries based on their specialization pattern of renewable energy generation technologies. EU countries belong to the same cluster at the international level, and the deep clustering model shows four patterns. Moreover, the findings highlighted the country profile to be used as a competitive advantage and the group of countries with the same or similar pattern that could be used as partners in implementing new technologies or as models for future actions. The geographical distribution of the specialization offers a picture of potential market development for patents and renewable energy technologies. The countries specialization is a hotspot for decision makers for further developments and policy design support. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy and Environmental Economics/Policy)
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Review

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17 pages, 828 KiB  
Review
A Review of the Energy Sector as a Key Factor in Industry 4.0: The Case of Spain
by Sonia García-Moreno and Víctor-Raúl López-Ruiz
Energies 2023, 16(11), 4446; https://doi.org/10.3390/en16114446 - 31 May 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2083
Abstract
Technological development has profoundly marked the evolution of the economy. The constant changes brought about by scientific and technological advances have been decisive in the transition from an analogue to a digital world. In this context, the impact of the fourth industrial revolution [...] Read more.
Technological development has profoundly marked the evolution of the economy. The constant changes brought about by scientific and technological advances have been decisive in the transition from an analogue to a digital world. In this context, the impact of the fourth industrial revolution (or Industry 4.0) manifests itself in many ways. Environmental impact is one of these. The energy sector has been evolving and changing just like the economy and society. Therefore, a study of this sector, and of the other related elements, is of interest to better understand the 4.0 concept. The promotion of sustainability at both the political and social levels has led to changes in different areas, such as the productive vision, the use of green energies, and the implementation of green taxes. Energy as a key factor in Industry 4.0 involves studying it both quantitatively and qualitatively. This is to understand the lights and shadows that the concept currently presents. Therefore, this work aims to bring the reality of the energy sector closer to reality, both in its positive and negative aspects, considering the main factors of incidence, to show the strengths and weaknesses that can be deduced. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy and Environmental Economics/Policy)
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16 pages, 969 KiB  
Review
Tackling Climate Change through Multi-Stakeholder Partnerships: Promoting SDG 17 to Combat Climate Change
by Elena Bulmer and Benito Yáñez-Araque
Energies 2023, 16(9), 3777; https://doi.org/10.3390/en16093777 - 28 Apr 2023
Viewed by 1934
Abstract
The seventeen Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) aim to address environmental, social, global, and economic challenges. The SDGs were a continuation of the Millennium Development Goals and assumed a common vision for the year 2030. Efforts to achieve the SDGs must be carried out [...] Read more.
The seventeen Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) aim to address environmental, social, global, and economic challenges. The SDGs were a continuation of the Millennium Development Goals and assumed a common vision for the year 2030. Efforts to achieve the SDGs must be carried out in an integrated manner, respecting the three pillars of sustainable development, which are economic, social, and environmental. This review analyses the viability of Sustainable Development Goal 17 (SDG 17), which aims to build global partnerships for development. It makes specific reference to multi-stakeholder collaboration between all sectors of society. While the first sixteen SDGs are dedicated to concrete actions, SDG 17 Partnerships for Development coordinates and facilitates the implementation of the other goals. SDG 17 promotes the “right way” of collaboration between different actors through the formation of multi-stakeholder partnerships, which are essential to foster sustainable development. Although SDG 17 has its multiple advantages, it also does have its limitations, such as the present absence of a lessons-learned repository to share and understand how multi-stakeholder partnerships can prove more effective in promoting the successful implementation of the rest of the SDGs, as well as that SDG 17 seems to be regarded as more appropriate to the achievement of the economic pillar of sustainability at the moment, rather than being applied more widely. In this review, we analyze two case studies located in the south-western part of France, from which one can observe the great number of stakeholders, some non-human, even inanimate, present even in relatively minor projects and how due consideration of the interests of all of them in a manner following due process (albeit lengthy) enables decisions to be reached correctly and approved projects implemented soundly. One of the projects was rejected and did not proceed, while the other was approved and is going ahead. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy and Environmental Economics/Policy)
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