Special Issue "Progress in Inorganic Halide Perovskites"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "Advanced Energy Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Anna Vinattieri
Website
Guest Editor
Department Physics and Astronomy, University of Florence, Via G.Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Italy
Interests: high resolution optical spectroscopy; semiconductor nanostructures; excitons; photonics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the last decade, a significant effort of research in physics and chemistry has been directed at the development and study of halide perovskites. These materials are definitely one of the most promising classes of semiconductors for applications in the field of renewables, photonics, and high radiation detection. Most of the recent literature focuses on hybrid organic–inorganic perovskites which have already demonstrated impressive performances in energy-harvesting applications. Nevertheless, hybrid perovskites suffer from poor material stability, and in the last few years, research has moved toward exploring the potentialities of their more stable inorganic counterparts.  

This Special Issue will provide a timely opportunity to present recent progress in the field of inorganic halide perovskites with a focus on innovative devices, in addition to solar cells, as LED, lasers, gas sensors, radiation detectors, etc. Contributions dedicated to advancement in the field of high-performance devices and fundamental research are welcome. In particular, we invite submission of papers addressing issues related to material synthesis, with a focus on ecofriendly perovskites, state-of-the-art morphological, structural, and optical studies, nonlinear optical properties, transport properties, etc.

Prof. Dr. Anna Vinattieri
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • lead-free perovskites
  • material stability
  • excitons
  • nonlinear optics
  • photovoltaic cells
  • sensors
  • photonics
  • detectors

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
Polymer/Inorganic Hole Transport Layer for Low-Temperature-Processed Perovskite Solar Cells
Energies 2020, 13(8), 2059; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13082059 - 20 Apr 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
In the search for improvements in perovskite solar cells (PSCs), several different aspects are currently being addressed, including an increase in the stability and a reduction in the hysteresis. Both are mainly achieved by improving the cell structure, employing new materials or novel [...] Read more.
In the search for improvements in perovskite solar cells (PSCs), several different aspects are currently being addressed, including an increase in the stability and a reduction in the hysteresis. Both are mainly achieved by improving the cell structure, employing new materials or novel cell arrangements. We introduce a hysteresis-free low-temperature planar PSC, composed of a poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT)/CuSCN bilayer as a hole transport layer (HTL) and a mixed cation perovskite absorber. Proper adjustment of the precursor concentration and thickness of the HTL led to a homogeneous and dense HTL on the perovskite layer. This strategy not only eliminated the hysteresis of the photocurrent, but also permitted power conversion efficiencies exceeding 15.3%. The P3HT/CuSCN bilayer strategy markedly improved the life span and stability of the non-encapsulated PSCs under atmospheric conditions and accelerated thermal stress. The device retained more than 80% of its initial efficiency after 100 h (60% after 500 h) of continuous thermal stress under ambient conditions. The performance and durability of the PSCs employing a polymer/inorganic bilayer as the HTL are improved mainly due to restraining perovskite ions, metals, and halides migration, emphasizing the pivotal role that can be played by the interface in the perovskite-additive hole transport materials (HTM) stack. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Progress in Inorganic Halide Perovskites)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Electrically Active Defects in Polycrystalline and Single Crystal Metal Halide Perovskite
Energies 2020, 13(7), 1643; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13071643 - 02 Apr 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
We studied electrically active defects in CsPbBr3 polycrystalline films and single crystals samples using the thermally stimulated currents (TSC) technique in the temperature range 100–400 K. Below room temperature, both polycrystalline and single-crystals TSC emission is composed by a quasi-continuum of energy [...] Read more.
We studied electrically active defects in CsPbBr3 polycrystalline films and single crystals samples using the thermally stimulated currents (TSC) technique in the temperature range 100–400 K. Below room temperature, both polycrystalline and single-crystals TSC emission is composed by a quasi-continuum of energy levels in the range 0.1–0.3 eV, and capture cross sections ~10−21 cm2. Above room temperature, TSC analysis reveals the presence of defect states in the range 0.40–0.52 eV only in polycrystalline samples, whereas these intermediate energy states are absent in TSC detected in single crystals. In polycrystalline films, the occupancy changes of an energy level at 0.45 eV strongly influences the room temperature photoconductivity, giving rise to slow transients due to defect passivation. In single-crystals, where intermediate energy states are absent, the photoconductivity response during illumination is almost stable and characterized by fast rise/decay times, a promising result for future applications of this material in photodetection and dosimetry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Progress in Inorganic Halide Perovskites)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Halide Pb-Free Double–Perovskites: Ternary vs. Quaternary Stoichiometry
Energies 2020, 13(14), 3516; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13143516 - 08 Jul 2020
Abstract
In view of their applicability in optoelectronics, we review here the relevant structural, electronic, and optical features of the inorganic Pb-free halide perovskite class. In particular, after discussing the reasons that have motivated their introduction in opposition to their more widely investigated organic-inorganic [...] Read more.
In view of their applicability in optoelectronics, we review here the relevant structural, electronic, and optical features of the inorganic Pb-free halide perovskite class. In particular, after discussing the reasons that have motivated their introduction in opposition to their more widely investigated organic-inorganic counterparts, we highlight milestones already achieved in their synthesis and characterization and show how the use of ab initio ground and excited state methods is relevant in predicting their properties and in disclosing yet unsolved issues which characterize both ternary and quaternary stoichiometry double-perovskites. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Progress in Inorganic Halide Perovskites)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop