Special Issue "Internal Combustion Engine Waste Heat Recovery"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "Thermal Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Sven B Andersson
Website
Guest Editor
Combustion and Propulsion Systems Division, Department of Mechanics and Maritime Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden
Interests: internal combustion engines

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Guest Editor is inviting submissions to a Special Issue of Energies on the subject area of "Internal Combustion Engine Waste Heat Recovery".

Internal combustion engines operating on fossil fuel consume about 70% of the world’s oil production, thereby producing about 10% of the world’s carbon dioxide equivalent emissions. Reducing fuel consumption has therefore been the goal of vehicle manufacturers for many years in order to meet market demands and to comply with existing and future legislation. A promising way of increasing fuel efficiency is by recovering waste heat, since more than half of the supplied fuel energy is lost as waste heat (e.g., different forms of cooling losses, exhaust losses, etc.). This Special Issue will deal with different solutions for this technology, so topics of interest for publication include, but are not limited to:

  • Thermodynamic cycles and working media;
  • Turbo compounding;
  • Thermoelectric generators.

Of special interest is how these systems can be integrated into a vehicle. Also, an analysis of how beneficial such a system could be (from an efficiency point of view) is important.

Prof. Dr. Sven B Andersson
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • thermodynamic cycles
  • turbocompounding
  • thermoelectric generators
  • expanders
  • heat exchangers
  • heat sources
  • working media
  • system integration
  • system control
  • modelling
  • experiments

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Closed-Loop PI Control of an Organic Rankine Cycle for Engine Exhaust Heat Recovery
Energies 2020, 13(15), 3817; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13153817 - 24 Jul 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
The internal combustion engine (ICE) as a main power source for transportation needs to improve its efficiency and reduce emissions. The Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) is a promising technique for exhaust heat recovery. However, vehicle engines normally operate under transient conditions with both [...] Read more.
The internal combustion engine (ICE) as a main power source for transportation needs to improve its efficiency and reduce emissions. The Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) is a promising technique for exhaust heat recovery. However, vehicle engines normally operate under transient conditions with both the engine speed and torque varying in a large range, which creates obstacles to the application of ORC in vehicles. It is important to investigate the dynamic performance of an ORC when matching with an ICE. In this study, the dynamic performance of an ICE-ORC combined system is investigated based on a heavy-duty diesel engine and a 5 kW ORC with a single-screw expander. First, dynamic simulation models of the ICE and the ORC are built in the software GT-Power. Then, the working parameters of the ORC system are optimized over the entire operation scope of the ICE. A closed-loop proportional-integral (PI) control together with a feedforward control is designed to regulate the operation of the ORC during the transient driving conditions. The response time and overshoot of the PI control are estimated and compared with that of the feedforward control alone. The results based on the World Harmonized Transient Cycle (WHTC) indicate that the designed closed-loop PI control has a shorter response time and a better trace capacity during the dynamic processes. The average output power and thermal efficiency during the WHTC cycle are improved by 3.23% and 2.77%, respectively. Compared with the feedforward control alone, the designed PI control is more suitable for practical applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Internal Combustion Engine Waste Heat Recovery)
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Open AccessArticle
Thermo-Economic Study of a Regenerative Dual-Loop ORC System Coupled to the Main Diesel Engines of a General Support Vessel
Energies 2020, 13(11), 2991; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13112991 - 10 Jun 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
A thermo-economic analysis of a regenerative dual-loop organic Rankine cycle (ORC) is conducted, which will be coupled with the main diesel engines of a general support vessel. An energy and exergy analysis of the regenerative dual-loop ORC is conducted. The energy and exergy [...] Read more.
A thermo-economic analysis of a regenerative dual-loop organic Rankine cycle (ORC) is conducted, which will be coupled with the main diesel engines of a general support vessel. An energy and exergy analysis of the regenerative dual-loop ORC is conducted. The energy and exergy analysis results of the regenerative dual-loop ORC are compared with pertinent results for a simple dual-loop ORC without regeneration. A mission analysis that was based on a vessel speed profile with the proposed ORC was conducted. A heat transfer analysis was performed for dimensioning the heat exchangers of both ORC loops. Finally, an economic analysis is conducted to calculate the total capital cost and the payback period of the proposed ORC. The results showed that the proposed ORC is thermodynamically superior in both energetic and exergetic terms compared to the simple dual-loop ORC. The total fuel cost saving is 337,493 Euros, the total CO2 emission saving is 1,153,416.4 kg, and the SO2 emission saving is 36,044.3 kg. The total capital cost of the proposed ORC is 2,546,000 Euros. Finally, the installation of the proposed ORC in the examined vessel is economically feasible because it results in a reasonable payback period, which is less than nine years. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Internal Combustion Engine Waste Heat Recovery)
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Open AccessArticle
Energy and Efficiency Evaluation of Feedback Branch Design in Thermoacoustic Stirling-Like Engines
Energies 2019, 12(20), 3867; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12203867 - 12 Oct 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Stirling-like thermoacoustic generators are external combustion engines that provide useful acoustic power in the absence of moving parts with high reliability and respect for the environment. The study of these systems involves a great complexity since the parameters that describe them, besides being [...] Read more.
Stirling-like thermoacoustic generators are external combustion engines that provide useful acoustic power in the absence of moving parts with high reliability and respect for the environment. The study of these systems involves a great complexity since the parameters that describe them, besides being numerous, present a high degree of coupling between them. This implies a great difficulty in characterizing the effects of any parametric variation on the performance of these devices. Due to the huge amount of data to analyze, the experiments and simulations required to address the problem involve high investments in time and resources, sometimes unaffordable. This article presents, how a sensitivity analysis applying the response surface methodology can be applied to optimize the feedback branch of a thermoacoustic Stirling-like engine. The proposed study is made by evaluating the comparative relevance of seven design variables. The dimensional reduction process identifies three significant factors: the frequency of operation, the internal diameter of compliance, and the inertance. Subsequently, the Response Surface Methodology is applied to assess the interaction effects of these three design parameters on the efficiency of the thermoacoustic engine, and an improvement of 6% has been achieved. The enhanced values given by the response surface methodology are validated using the DeltaEC software. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Internal Combustion Engine Waste Heat Recovery)
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Open AccessArticle
Lithium Hydroxide Reaction for Low Temperature Chemical Heat Storage: Hydration and Dehydration Reaction
Energies 2019, 12(19), 3741; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12193741 - 30 Sep 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
As a key parameter of a chemical heat storage material, the hydration and dehydration reaction characteristics of lithium hydroxide (LiOH) at pure vapor condition is unclear. In this study, we focused on the hydration reaction and dehydration process of LiOH at the pure [...] Read more.
As a key parameter of a chemical heat storage material, the hydration and dehydration reaction characteristics of lithium hydroxide (LiOH) at pure vapor condition is unclear. In this study, we focused on the hydration reaction and dehydration process of LiOH at the pure vapor condition. The pressure–temperature diagram of LiOH equilibrium was measured. The hydration and dehydration of LiOH at various conditions have been experimentally investigated. The results show that the steam diffusion can be greatly enhanced at vacuum condition. A thin layer of LiOH is uniformly dispersed in the reactor, which can greatly increase the heat transfer between the LiOH material and reactor, leading to a higher hydration reaction rate of LiOH. Furthermore, the steam pressure, reaction temperature, and the particle size of LiOH can greatly influence the hydration reaction. A maximum hydration reaction rate of 80% is obtained under the conditions of 47 °C, steam pressure of 9 kPa, and particle size of 32–40 μm. LiOH exhibits a different reaction property at the condition of pure steam without air and below atmospheric pressure. A store and reaction condition of LiOH with isolation of air is recommended when apply LiOH as a heat storage material at low temperature. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Internal Combustion Engine Waste Heat Recovery)
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