Special Issue "Emerging Photovoltaic Technology in Northern Europe"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "Solar Energy and Photovoltaic Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 12 April 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Seppo Valkealahti
Website
Guest Editor
Electrical Engineering, Tampere University, P.O. Box 692, FI-33101 Tampere, Finland
Interests: power engineering; renewable energy; solar power; photovoltaic power systems; disruption of electrical energy system

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In modern photovoltaic systems, there is an increasing need to improve overall system efficiency and performance as a weather-dependent and highly variable power generation. Photovoltaic systems must meet, and even exceed, ever-increasing power grid connection requirements in order to support grid stability and ensure quality of electricity. In addition, future photovoltaic systems must be able to maintain the stability of the power grid and even initiate the power systems, at least microgrids. Due to the erosion of system installation costs, photovoltaic investments are following the exponential growth curve also in Northern European conditions, and there is a need to remove technical and nontechnical barriers to the large-scale integration of solar photovoltaic power into the power systems, distribution networks, and electricity markets. Photovoltaic systems must also be adapted to local radiation conditions and electrical system needs with minimal maintenance costs. Detection of internal faults in photovoltaic systems and reduction of energy losses, for example, due to soiling or partial shading, is essential.

This Special Issue has the objective of collecting recent original research results on modeling the operation of photovoltaic systems in Northern European conditions with the aim of maximizing output power, improving integration into power systems and distribution networks, and ensuring continuity of electricity service.

Prof. Dr. Seppo Valkealahti
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Photovoltaic systems
  • Grid integration
  • Fault detection
  • Degradation detection
  • PV in Northern Europe
  • Electricity markets
  • Modeling of PV system
  • Weather dependence
  • PV in electricity systems

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
Operation of a PV Power Plant during Overpower Events Caused by the Cloud Enhancement Phenomenon
Energies 2020, 13(9), 2185; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13092185 - 01 May 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
Partly cloudy days possess two characteristics that can significantly increase the photovoltaic (PV) generator power: the operating temperature of the PV panels can cool down during the shade periods, and the irradiance can be enhanced due to the cloud enhancement phenomenon. If an [...] Read more.
Partly cloudy days possess two characteristics that can significantly increase the photovoltaic (PV) generator power: the operating temperature of the PV panels can cool down during the shade periods, and the irradiance can be enhanced due to the cloud enhancement phenomenon. If an overirradiance event is preceded by a long shade period, the maximum power of a PV generator can occasionally be much higher than the nominal nameplate power. During the overpower events, the inverter is operating in power-limiting mode whereby the operating voltage is increased to decrease the power of the PV generator. We created a simulation model of a 31.9 kW PV generator and used 12 months of irradiance and PV panel temperature measurement data to analyze its operation. We analyzed the PV generator power during the overirradiance events and applied various static power limits to calculate the operating voltage ranges in case of power curtailment. During the observation period, the maximum power produced by the PV generator was 1.42 times its nominal power. The duration of the overpower events was up to several minutes, but the typical duration was only some tens of seconds. The strongest overpower events occur seldom and their duration is only some seconds. Due to the overpower events, the operating voltage may receive high values, especially if the DC-to-AC power ratio is large. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Photovoltaic Technology in Northern Europe)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
A Novel Fault Classification Approach for Photovoltaic Systems
Energies 2020, 13(2), 308; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13020308 - 08 Jan 2020
Cited by 7
Abstract
Photovoltaic (PV) energy has become one of the main sources of renewable energy and is currently the fastest-growing energy technology. As PV energy continues to grow in importance, the investigation of the faults and degradation of PV systems is crucial for better stability [...] Read more.
Photovoltaic (PV) energy has become one of the main sources of renewable energy and is currently the fastest-growing energy technology. As PV energy continues to grow in importance, the investigation of the faults and degradation of PV systems is crucial for better stability and performance of electrical systems. In this work, a fault classification algorithm is proposed to achieve accurate and early failure detection in PV systems. The analysis is carried out considering the feature extraction capabilities of the wavelet transform and classification attributes of radial basis function networks (RBFNs). In order to improve the performance of the proposed classifier, the dynamic fusion of kernels is performed. The performance of the proposed technique is tested on a 1 kW single-phase stand-alone PV system, which depicted a 100% training efficiency under 13 s and 97% testing efficiency under 0.2 s, which is better than the techniques in the literature. The obtained results indicate that the developed method can effectively detect faults with low misclassification. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Photovoltaic Technology in Northern Europe)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Review on the PV Hosting Capacity in Distribution Networks
Energies 2020, 13(18), 4756; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13184756 - 11 Sep 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
The increasing penetration of Photovoltaic (PV) generation results in challenges regarding network operation, management and planning. Correspondingly, Distribution Network Operators (DNOs) are in the need of totally new understanding. The establishment of comprehensive standards for maximum PV integration into the network, without adversely [...] Read more.
The increasing penetration of Photovoltaic (PV) generation results in challenges regarding network operation, management and planning. Correspondingly, Distribution Network Operators (DNOs) are in the need of totally new understanding. The establishment of comprehensive standards for maximum PV integration into the network, without adversely impacting the normal operating conditions, is also needed. This review article provides an extensive review of the Hosting Capacity (HC) definitions based on different references and estimated HC with actual figures in different geographical areas and network conditions. Moreover, a comprehensive review of limiting factors and improvement methods for HC is presented along with voltage rise limits of different countries under PV integration. Peak load is the major reference used for HC definition and the prime limiting constraint for PV HC is the voltage violations. However, the varying definitions in different references lead to the conclusion that, neither the reference values nor the limiting factors are unique values and HC can alter depending on the reference, network conditions, topology, location, and PV deployment scenario. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Photovoltaic Technology in Northern Europe)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop