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Special Issue "Community Microgrids"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "A5: Smart Grids and Microgrids".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 August 2021) | Viewed by 3488

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Ahmed Mohamed
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Electrical Engineering, Grove School of Engineering City University of New York, City College, New York, NY 10031, USA
Interests: smart grids; critical infrastructure interdependency; transportation electrification
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Ursula Eicker
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Canada Excellence Research Chair in Smart, Sustainable and Resilient Communities and Cities, Department of Building, Civil, and Environmental Engineering, Gina Cody School of Engineering and Computer Science, Concordia University, Montréal, QC H3G 1M8, Canada
Interests: Energy Efficiency in Buildings; Sustainable Energy Supply Systems; Renewable Energy; Energy Modelling; Zero-carbon Cities

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A community microgrid is a local energy network supported by DERs, including renewable energy sources, energy storage systems, electric vehicles, and flexible loads, which acts as a single controllable entity. It interfaces with its surrounding distribution grid through multiple points of common coupling, and encompasses multiple coordinated DERs. DERs within a community microgrid are shared among multiple users. A community microgrid leverages the available resources at multiple neighboring facilitates and buildings (e.g., available space), to make microgrids more technically and economically feasible. Community microgrids substantially increase the overall grid resilience, since they can provide grid functions (e.g., load flexibility) during normal operation, and can island themselves during blackouts. The scale of a community microgrid may extend from a partial feeder community microgrid, to a feeder microgrid, to an area substation or multiple area substations community microgrid.

The most recent IEEE 1547 DER interconnection standard requires DERs to have communications capabilities and DER grid support functions. Community microgrids will inevitably introduce information exchange between DERs, and the utility or a DER integrator. Many different independent communication technologies and interface standards (e.g., PLC, WiFi, and ZigBee) are likely to be used. As more multiple vendors’ communications devices are introduced, ensuring interoperability among these devices via standardized communications protocols and other interface standards will be critical. In addition, since cyber security of DER information exchange has not historically received much attention, new cyber vulnerabilities will be introduced.

This Special Issue invites original research papers to address the design and dimensioning, control, operation, modeling and optimization of community microgrids. Moreover, the authors are encouraged to submit papers addressing the state-of-the-art and recent advancements in the areas, providing useful guidelines for future research directions.

Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Design and dimensioning of community microgrids;
  • Control techniques and architectures for community microgrids;
  • Operation and energy management of community microgrids;
  • Information and communication technologies for community microgrids (technical communication requirements, interoperability, etc.);
  • Cybersecurity for community microgrids;
  • Operational technologies for community microgrids;
  • Applications of artificial intelligence in community microgrids;
  • Coordination of networked community microgrids;
  • Role of electric vehicles in community microgrids;
  • Case studies and demonstrations.

Prof. Ahmed Mohamed
Prof. Dr. habil. Ursula Eicker
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Community microgrids
  • DERs
  • Electric vehicles
  • Renewable energy
  • Resilience
  • Smart grid
  • Sustainability

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
A Novel Optimization Algorithm for Solar Panels Selection towards a Self-Powered EV Parking Lot and Its Impact on the Distribution System
Energies 2021, 14(15), 4515; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14154515 - 26 Jul 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 834
Abstract
This paper proposes an original multi-criteria decision-making optimization algorithm to select the best solar panels in an existing market and optimally size the photovoltaic (PV) system for an electric vehicle parking lot (EVPL). Our proposed algorithm is called rank-weigh-rank (RWR), and it is [...] Read more.
This paper proposes an original multi-criteria decision-making optimization algorithm to select the best solar panels in an existing market and optimally size the photovoltaic (PV) system for an electric vehicle parking lot (EVPL). Our proposed algorithm is called rank-weigh-rank (RWR), and it is compared to the well-known technique for order of preference by similarity to ideal solution (TOPSIS) optimization algorithm under the same conditions for validation purposes. Results show that the speed of our proposed algorithm (RWR) in finding the best solution increases exponentially compared to TOPSIS when the numbers of alternatives and criteria increase. Moreover, 77% is the probability of obtaining results with more than 80% accuracy compared to TOPSIS, which validates the efficiency of our algorithm. In addition, we were able to design an EVPL with a power self-sufficiency ratio of 60.8%, the energy self-sufficiency ratio of 74.7%, and a payback period of 10.58 years. Moreover, the renewable energy-based EVPL was able to reduce the power losses on the network by 95.7% compared to an EVPL without a renewable energy system and improve the voltage deviation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Community Microgrids)
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Article
Implementation of Resilient Self-Healing Microgrids with IEC 61850-Based Communications
Energies 2021, 14(3), 547; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14030547 - 21 Jan 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 759
Abstract
Due to the high penetration of distributed energy resources (DER) and emerging DER interconnection and interoperability requirements, fast and standardized information exchange is essential for stable, resilient, and reliable operations in microgrids. This paper proposes fast fault detection, isolation, and restoration (F-FDIR) for [...] Read more.
Due to the high penetration of distributed energy resources (DER) and emerging DER interconnection and interoperability requirements, fast and standardized information exchange is essential for stable, resilient, and reliable operations in microgrids. This paper proposes fast fault detection, isolation, and restoration (F-FDIR) for microgrid application with the IEC 61850 Generic Object Oriented Substation Event (GOOSE) communication considering the communication/system failure. GOOSE provides a mechanism for lightweight low latency peer-to-peer data exchange between devices, which reduces the restoration time compared to conventional client-server communication paradigm. The proposed mitigation method for the communication/system failure can find an available restoration scenario and reduce the overall process time. Hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) testbed is designed and implemented with real time digital simulator, microgrid control system, and protection and control intelligent electric devices (IEDs) for the validation. The experimental results show that the proposed F-FDIR and IEC 61850 models can enhance the reliability and interoperability of the microgrid operation and enable self-healing microgrids. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Community Microgrids)
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Article
A Novel Data-Energy Management Algorithm for Smart Transformers to Optimize the Total Load Demand in Smart Homes
Energies 2020, 13(18), 4984; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13184984 - 22 Sep 2020
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1106
Abstract
The increased integration of Electric Vehicles (EVs) into the distribution network can create severe issues—especially when demand response programs and time-varying electricity prices are applied, EVs tend to charge during the off-peak time to minimize the electricity cost. Hence, another peak demand might [...] Read more.
The increased integration of Electric Vehicles (EVs) into the distribution network can create severe issues—especially when demand response programs and time-varying electricity prices are applied, EVs tend to charge during the off-peak time to minimize the electricity cost. Hence, another peak demand might be created, and other solutions are required. Many researchers tried to solve the problem; however, limitations exist because of the decentralized topology of the network. The system operator is not allowed to control the end-users’ load due to security and privacy issues. To overcome this situation, we propose a novel data-energy management algorithm on the transformer’s level that controls the power demand profiles of the householders and exchange energy between them without violating their privacy and security. Our method is compared to an existing one in the literature based on a decentralized control strategy. Simulations show that our approach has reduced the electricity cost of the end-users by 3%, increased the revenue of the system operator, and reduced techno-economic losses by 50% and 42%, respectively. Our strategy shows better performance even with a 100% penetration level of EVs on the network, in which it respects the network’s constraints and maintains the voltage within the recommended limits. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Community Microgrids)
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