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Special Issue "Advanced Environmental Controls for High-Performance Buildings and Sustainability"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "F: Energy and Buildings".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 June 2021) | Viewed by 5265

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Joon-Ho Choi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Architecture, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-0291, USA
Interests: human–building integration; indoor environmental quality; sustainable design; building energy efficiency; cyber-physical system; adaptive thermal comfort; bio-sensing adaptive environmental control; post-occupancy evaluation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Ongun Berk Kazanci
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
International Centre for Indoor Environment and Energy – ICIEE, Department of CivilEngineering, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark
Interests: indoor environmental quality (IEQ); human thermal comfort; low temperature heating and high temperature cooling systems (particularly water-based radiant heating and cooling systems), their integration with renewable energy resources; thermodynamic analyses of HVAC systems and building components; building energy performance simulation; applied computational fluid dynamics (CFD)
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Building performance has been significantly impressed for the importance of occupant environmental comfort and wellbeing, as well as environmental sustainability. To accomplish these functional needs, many building technologies have recently emerged in multiple domains, such as environmental controls, building design, and energy-efficient systems. However, in spite of many (system) design and technical efforts to improve building performance, the uncertainty of existing mechanisms, such as pre-defined computational modeling and conventional guidelines, has frequently resulted in lower performance efficiency than intended. As a consequence, occupants’ environmental discomfort and stress, and inefficient environmental performance have been frequently witnessed. Therefore, novel and creative research is desired toward advancing environmental control paradigm as a function of multi-disciplinary expert knowledge across engineering, design, and human physiology.

The aim of this special issue is to primarily advance the vision of advanced environmental controls of recent high-performance building studies in order to share the insights and contribute to developing novel research concepts in the domain of building science and technology. This special issue invites the most recent research and reflection of indigenous scholars and will provide a platform to discuss all aspects relating to advanced environmental controls for high-performance buildings. The following are potential research topics to welcome in this special issue, but are not limited to:

  • Indoor environmental quality
  • Occupant-centric environmental controls
  • Innovative sustainable design
  • Human environmental comfort
  • Adaptive environmental/thermal controls
  • Human factors and physiology in the built environment
  • Applied-computational algorithms to buildings
  • Energy-efficient building

Prof. Dr. Joon-Ho Choi
Prof. Dr. Ongun Berk Kazanci
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Environmental resiliency
  • Occupant-centric
  • Human factors
  • Energy efficiency
  • Smart buildings

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
Airflow Fluctuation from Linear Diffusers in an Office Building: The Thermal Comfort Analysis
Energies 2021, 14(16), 4808; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14164808 - 06 Aug 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 562
Abstract
In buildings, the HVAC systems are responsible for a major part of the energy consumption. Incorrect design or selection of the system and improper installation, operation, and maintenance of the systems’ elements may result in increased energy consumption. It is worth remembering that [...] Read more.
In buildings, the HVAC systems are responsible for a major part of the energy consumption. Incorrect design or selection of the system and improper installation, operation, and maintenance of the systems’ elements may result in increased energy consumption. It is worth remembering that the main aim of the appropriate system is to maintain the high quality of the indoor environment. Appropriate selection of the HVAC solution ensures both thermal and quality parameters of the air, independently of the internal and external heat loads. The microclimate of a room is affected not only by air temperature, humidity, and purity, but also by air velocity in the occupied zone. The proper air velocity distribution prevents discomfort, particularly at workstations. Based on the measurements in the office building, an analysis of velocity profiles of air supplying two different types of linear diffusers was carried out. The analysis was made based on the results of measurements performed with thermoanemometers in the actual facility. During the study, temperature of the supply air was lower that the air in the room. Analysis was focused on the airflow fluctuation and its impact on the users’ comfort. This is an obvious topic but extremely rarely mentioned in publications related to air diffusers. The results show the importance of air fluctuation and its influence on the users’ comfort. During the measurements, the instantaneous air velocity for one of the analyzed types of the diffuser was up to 0.34 m/s, while the average value from the period of 240 s for the same measuring point was relatively low: it was 0.19 m/s. Only including the airflow variability over time allowed for choosing the type of diffuser, which ensures the comfort of users. The measurements carried out for two linear diffusers showed differences in the operation of these diffusers. The velocity in the occupied zone was much higher for one type (0.36 m/s, 3.00 m from diffusers) than for another one (0.22 m/s, 5.00 m from diffusers). The improper selection of the diffuser’s type and its location may increase the risk of the draft in the occupied zone. Full article
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Article
Optimal Air Conditioner Placement Using a Simple Thermal Environment Analysis Method for Continuous Large Spaces with Predominant Advection
Energies 2021, 14(15), 4663; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14154663 - 31 Jul 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 935
Abstract
The number of houses with large, continuous spaces has increased recently. With improvements in insulation performance, it has become possible to efficiently air condition such spaces using a single air conditioner. However, the air conditioning efficiency depends on the placement of the air [...] Read more.
The number of houses with large, continuous spaces has increased recently. With improvements in insulation performance, it has become possible to efficiently air condition such spaces using a single air conditioner. However, the air conditioning efficiency depends on the placement of the air conditioner. The only way to determine the optimal placement of such air conditioners is to conduct an experiment or use computational fluid dynamic analysis. However, because the analysis is performed over a limited period, it is difficult to consider non-stationarity effects without using an energy simulation. Therefore, in this study, energy simulations and computational fluid dynamics analyses were coupled to develop a thermal environment analysis method that considers non-stationarity effects, and various air conditioner arrangements were investigated to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed method. The accuracy verification results generally followed the experimental results. A case study was conducted using the calculated boundary conditions, and the results showed that the placement of two air conditioners in the target experimental house could provide sufficient air conditioning during both winter and summer. Our results suggest that this method can be used to conduct preliminary studies if the necessary data are available during design or if an experimental house is used. Full article
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Article
Climate Adaptive Design Improvement Strategies of Traditional Dwellings in Southern Zhejiang for the Plum Rain Season Considering Comfort Conditions
Energies 2020, 13(6), 1428; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13061428 - 19 Mar 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 905
Abstract
This study investigated the adaptations of traditional dwellings to the complex regional microclimate in southern Zhejiang, China. Typical traditional dwellings in a village in the foothills and a village on the mid-slopes of Zhejiang’s alpine region were selected to study traditional construction strategies [...] Read more.
This study investigated the adaptations of traditional dwellings to the complex regional microclimate in southern Zhejiang, China. Typical traditional dwellings in a village in the foothills and a village on the mid-slopes of Zhejiang’s alpine region were selected to study traditional construction strategies for climate responsiveness and the comfort level of indoor environments during the very humid plum rain season in early summer. Fundamental analysis of the climate and architecture, a response analysis of the dwelling form, an occupants’ comfort satisfaction survey, and field measurements of indoor and outdoor thermal environmental parameters were performed. The traditional dwellings and their design strategies for various regional environmental factors were explored from the perspective of (1) regional climate-adaptive strategies, (2) the thermal, airflow, lighting, and acoustic qualities of the indoor environment, and (3) the occupants’ indoor environment satisfaction. The results indicated that traditional dwellings in southern Zhejiang incorporate strategies of various effectiveness in ensuring indoor comfort. Full article
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Article
Multi-Season Assessment of Occupant Responses to Manual Shading and Dynamic Glass in a Workplace Environment
Energies 2020, 13(1), 60; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13010060 - 20 Dec 2019
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 1964
Abstract
The quality and controllability of the building façade can significantly contribute to building indoor environmental quality (IEQ) as well as the building’s energy efficiency. Advanced technologies that support a façade’s dynamic response to climatic changes, such as electrochromic (dynamic) glazing, have emerged as [...] Read more.
The quality and controllability of the building façade can significantly contribute to building indoor environmental quality (IEQ) as well as the building’s energy efficiency. Advanced technologies that support a façade’s dynamic response to climatic changes, such as electrochromic (dynamic) glazing, have emerged as smart systems for IEQ and environmental sustainability. This research summarizes a four-season study of office workers moving from a floor with conventional blinds to work environments equipped with smart dynamic glazing which changes tint in response to weather condition to control daylighting levels. Multiple occupant environmental satisfaction surveys were conducted over one year to investigate differences in environmental and psychological responses to office settings with manual, and often static, facades as compared to offices with dynamic glazing. This research confirms that dynamic glazing significantly affected occupants’ environmental satisfaction—enhancing individuals’ environmental perceptions and psychological health—as compared to manual blinds. It reveals that the occupants in work environments with dynamic glazing reported 21.7% higher productivity gains, 24.8% increased ability to relax, 12.7% improved concentration, 25.3% better moods and 29.4% greater alertness than when they were in offices in the same building with manual shading devices. Also, the dynamic feature of the smart glazing showed a significant contribution to perceived work productivity while enhancing positive emotional responses by an average of 26%. Full article
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