Topical Collection "Genetic Diversity"

Editors

Dr. José Luis García-Marín
E-Mail Website
Collection Editor
Laboratori d’Ictiologia Genètica, Universitat de Girona, c/Mª Aurèlia Capmany 40, 17003 Girona, Spain
Interests: conservation genetics; fisheries management; genetics of invasive species; phylogenetics; population genetics
Prof. Dr. Rosane Garcia Collevatti
E-Mail Website
Collection Editor
Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Goiás (UFG), Goiânia 31270-901, Brazil
Interests: phylogeography; population genomics; population genetic structure; landscape genetics; community phylogeny

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

Genetic diversity represents the basal component of biodiversity. The amount of genetic diversity present within and among populations controls their adaptive response to environmental change and, hence, the long-time survival of populations. By maintaining high levels of genetic diversity, exploited biodiversity prevents extinction and, therefore, ensures the well-being of human populations.

Dr. José Luis García-Marín
Prof. Dr. Rosane Garcia Collevatti
Collection Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the collection website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diversity is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • genetic diversity
  • conservation genetics
  • adaptive evolution
  • population genetics
  • genetic resources
  • inbreeding

Published Papers (4 papers)

2022

Article
Genetic Diversity and Maternal Lineage of Indo-Pacific Bottlenose Dolphin (Tursiops aduncus) in the Andaman Sea of Thailand
Diversity 2022, 14(12), 1093; https://doi.org/10.3390/d14121093 - 09 Dec 2022
Viewed by 698
Abstract
Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus) are a coastal species found in Thai waters off the coasts of the Andaman Sea and the Gulf of Thailand. This species was recently re-listed as near-threatened by the IUCN Red List, though the population status [...] Read more.
Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus) are a coastal species found in Thai waters off the coasts of the Andaman Sea and the Gulf of Thailand. This species was recently re-listed as near-threatened by the IUCN Red List, though the population status in Thai seas is not known. Here, we investigated genetic diversity, population structure, maternal lineage, and demographics by analyzing skin tissue samples (n = 30) of T. aduncus stranded along the Andaman coastline of Thailand between 1990 and 2019. This study was based on 11 microsatellite loci and 265 bp mtDNA control regions compared to data available through the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). From microsatellites, the observed heterozygosity (Ho) ranged from 0.46 to 0.85. The mean fixation index (F) value for all loci was 0.10 ± 0.04, which suggests some degree of inbreeding. Two genetic clusters (the most likely K at K = 2) were observed in T. aduncus through the population structure analysis using multiple criteria. For the mtDNA control region, a total of 17 haplotypes were found for dolphins in Thai seas (14 haplotypes from our samples; three haplotypes from the NCBI database) with high levels of haplotype diversity (h) at 0.926 ± 0.027 and nucleotide diversity (π) at 0.045 ± 0.002. A decline in the effective population size from 0.05 million years ago also was observed in Thai T. aduncus through Bayesian Skyline Plots analysis. A unique set of haplotypes was identified in our samples, which may have originated from the Australian and Indian Oceans rather than the Western Pacific Ocean. These results improve our understanding of the maternal lineage of the Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin, which can be used for monitoring population status and establishing better conservation plans for this species in the Thai Andaman Sea. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Article
As the Goose Flies: Migration Routes and Timing Influence Patterns of Genetic Diversity in a Circumpolar Migratory Herbivore
Diversity 2022, 14(12), 1067; https://doi.org/10.3390/d14121067 - 03 Dec 2022
Viewed by 939
Abstract
Migration schedules and the timing of other annual events (e.g., pair formation and molt) can affect the distribution of genetic diversity as much as where these events occur. The greater white-fronted goose (Anser albifrons) is a circumpolar goose species, exhibiting temporal [...] Read more.
Migration schedules and the timing of other annual events (e.g., pair formation and molt) can affect the distribution of genetic diversity as much as where these events occur. The greater white-fronted goose (Anser albifrons) is a circumpolar goose species, exhibiting temporal and spatial variation of events among populations during the annual cycle. Previous range-wide genetic assessments of the nuclear genome based on eight microsatellite loci suggest a single, largely panmictic population despite up to five subspecies currently recognized based on phenotypic differences. We used double digest restriction-site associated DNA (ddRAD-seq) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence data to re-evaluate estimates of spatial genomic structure and to characterize how past and present processes have shaped the patterns of genetic diversity and connectivity across the Arctic and subarctic. We uncovered previously undetected inter-population differentiation with genetic clusters corresponding to sampling locales associated with current management groups. We further observed subtle genetic clustering within each management unit that can be at least partially explained by the timing and directionality of migration events along with other behaviors during the annual cycle. The Tule Goose (A. a. elgasi) and Greenland subspecies (A. a. flavirostris) showed the highest level of divergence among all sampling locales investigated. The recovery of previously undetected broad and fine-scale spatial structure suggests that the strong cultural transmission of migratory behavior restricts gene flow across portions of the species’ range. Our data further highlight the importance of re-evaluating previous assessments conducted based on a small number of highly variable genetic markers in phenotypically diverse species. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Sandaracinobacteroides saxicola sp. nov., a Zeaxanthin-Producing and Halo-Sensitive Bacterium Isolated from Fully Weathered Granitic Soil, and the Diversity of Its ARHDs
Diversity 2022, 14(10), 807; https://doi.org/10.3390/d14100807 - 27 Sep 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 595
Abstract
A yellow, Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, non-spore-forming, motile, and rod-shaped bacterial strain designated M6T was isolated from fully weathered granitic soil. The strain showing the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to M6T was Sandaracinobacteroides hominis SZY PN-1T (96.3%), the only species [...] Read more.
A yellow, Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, non-spore-forming, motile, and rod-shaped bacterial strain designated M6T was isolated from fully weathered granitic soil. The strain showing the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to M6T was Sandaracinobacteroides hominis SZY PN-1T (96.3%), the only species in the genus Sandaracinobacteroides. The average nucleotide identity and digital DNA-DNA hybridization value between these two strains were 72.6% and 18.0% respectively. Growth was inhibited by NaCl (≥0.1% (w/v)). Strain M6T contained C18:1ω7c (33.8%), C14:0 2-OH (16.6%), summed feature 3 (15.8%), and C16:0 (12.6%) as the major fatty acids. The polar lipids profile consisted of phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, an unidentified glycolipid, four unidentified phospholipids, and four unidentified lipids. The genome of strain M6T was 3.4 Mb with 67.7% GC content. Further genomic analysis revealed a biosynthetic gene cluster for zeaxanthin, the production of which was verified by a high-resolution mass spectrum. The existence of multiple genes for aromatic ring-hydroxylating dioxygenases implies the potential ability for organic pollution controlling. The morphological, physiological, chemotaxonomic, and phylogenetic analysis clearly distinguished this strain from its phylogenetic neighbors, thus strain M6T represents a novel species of the genus Sandaracinobacteroides, for which the name Sandaracinobacteroides saxicola sp. nov. is proposed. The type of strain is M6T (=CGMCC 1.19164T=NBRC 115420T). Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Article
The Role of the Environment in Shaping the Genomic Variation in an Insular Wild Boar Population
Diversity 2022, 14(9), 774; https://doi.org/10.3390/d14090774 - 19 Sep 2022
Viewed by 684
Abstract
The Sardinian population of wild boar (WB, Sus scrofa meridionalis) has evolved on this Mediterranean island since its arrival in Neolithic age. Climate and land use vary across the island; high temperatures and dryness represent limiting factors for the development and reproduction [...] Read more.
The Sardinian population of wild boar (WB, Sus scrofa meridionalis) has evolved on this Mediterranean island since its arrival in Neolithic age. Climate and land use vary across the island; high temperatures and dryness represent limiting factors for the development and reproduction of the species. Hence, the environment can have contributed to create the morphological differences we observe today across the island and could sustain the genetic structure that has been previously observed using neutral molecular markers. We therefore searched for genomic signatures of local adaptation in a sample of Sardinian WB genotyped at almost 50 K single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Genetic structure was observed in the population separating the northwest and southwest from the east of the island, where internal substructure also emerged. We identified 49 SNPs as candidate loci involved in adaptation and 61 genes. Gene ontology enrichment analysis revealed over-representation of terms related to cell localization, motility, and adhesion, but also related to anatomical development and immunity. According to our results, the environment seems to have played a role in shaping the genetic differentiation of the Sardinian wild boar in a limited evolutionary timescale. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Genetic diversity represents the basal component of biodiversity. The amount of genetic diversity present within and among populations controls their adaptive response to environmental change and, hence, the long-time survival of populations. By maintaining high levels of genetic diversity, exploited biodiversity prevents extinction and, therefore, ensures the well-being of human populations.

Keywords

  • genetic diversity
  • conservation genetics
  • adaptive evolution
  • population genetics
  • genetic resources
  • inbreeding
Back to TopTop