Special Issue "Management and Control of Invasive Crayfish (Crustacea)"

A special issue of Diversity (ISSN 1424-2818).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Piero G. Giulianini

Department of Life Science, University of Trieste, Trieste, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: crustacean; insect and fish ecophysiology (growth, reproduction and stress responses); alien species

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Non-indigenous crayfish species (NICS) are on the rise due to the synergistic effects of climate change and habitat degradation. Their impacts on biodiversity, loss of ecosystem services, human health and economy have been described in recent years. A North American species is reported among the 100 worst invasive species (DASIE) and among the nine with the worst impact on more than four threatened species in Europe (GENOVESI et al. 2015). At the present time, the management of NICS has become a worldwide priority and it is mandatory to study their biology in order to find new methods for their control as well as carefully evaluating the status of endangered indigenous crayfish species (ICS). This Special Issue provides a platform to highlight new research and significant advances in NICS control and in evaluating the status of ICS.

Prof. Piero G. Giulianini
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diversity is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 850 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Non-indigenous crayfish
  • Alien species
  • Management
  • Control
  • Indigenous crayfish
  • Conservation

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Biocide Treatment of Invasive Signal Crayfish: Successes, Failures and Lessons Learned
Diversity 2019, 11(3), 29; https://doi.org/10.3390/d11030029
Received: 28 January 2019 / Revised: 14 February 2019 / Accepted: 18 February 2019 / Published: 26 February 2019
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Abstract
Signal crayfish, as an invasive alien species in Europe, have caused impacts on aquatic communities and losses of native crayfish. Eradication of recently established populations may be possible in small ponds (<2.5 ha) and short lengths of small watercourses using a nonselective biocide. [...] Read more.
Signal crayfish, as an invasive alien species in Europe, have caused impacts on aquatic communities and losses of native crayfish. Eradication of recently established populations may be possible in small ponds (<2.5 ha) and short lengths of small watercourses using a nonselective biocide. Between 2004 and 2012, a total of 13 sites in the U.K. were assessed for suitability. Six were treated with natural pyrethrum and crayfish were successfully eradicated from three. In Norway, five sites were assessed and two sites were treated with a synthetic pyrethroid, cypermethrin, both successfully. In Sweden, three sites were treated with another synthetic pyrethroid, deltamethrin, all successfully. Defining the likely extent of population was critical in determining the feasibility of treatment, as well as the ability to treat the whole population effectively. Important constraints on projects included site size, habitat complexity, environmental risks, cooperation of landowners and funding availability. Successful projects were manageably small, had good project leadership, had cooperation from stakeholders, had access to resources and were carried out within one to three years. Factors influencing success included treating beyond the likely maximum geographical extent of the population and taking care to dose the treated area thoroughly (open water, plus the banks, margins, inflows and outflows). Recommendations are given on assessing the feasibility of biocide treatments and project-planning. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Management and Control of Invasive Crayfish (Crustacea))
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Open AccessArticle
Subterranean Invasion by Gapped Ringed Crayfish: Effectiveness of a Removal Effort and Barrier Installation
Diversity 2019, 11(1), 3; https://doi.org/10.3390/d11010003
Received: 31 October 2018 / Revised: 13 December 2018 / Accepted: 25 December 2018 / Published: 29 December 2018
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Abstract
Non-native crayfish invasion is a major threat to many stream fauna; however, invasions in subterranean habitats are rarely documented. Our study objectives were to examine demographics and morphological and life-history traits of a gapped ringed crayfish Faxonius neglectus chaenodactylus population that invaded Tumbling [...] Read more.
Non-native crayfish invasion is a major threat to many stream fauna; however, invasions in subterranean habitats are rarely documented. Our study objectives were to examine demographics and morphological and life-history traits of a gapped ringed crayfish Faxonius neglectus chaenodactylus population that invaded Tumbling Creek Cave and determine the effects of removal on the population. Crayfish were found throughout the cave though fewer individuals were observed upstream of an installed weir. Fecund females were collected in nearly all months, but were prevalent during spring (February–June). Males and females were of similar sizes. Males had larger chelae and chelae that were regenerated slightly more often than females. Removal of >4000 crayfish since 2011 resulted in reduced abundances, but the population persisted. Age estimates from counting bands on gastric mills indicated crayfish within the cave lived longer than populations in nearby Big Creek (6 vs. 4 years). Recent efforts to prevent upstream cave migrations included a barrier installation and since installation, few crayfish have been located upstream. We show that exploitation of new environments may lead to trait changes (i.e., reproduction and longevity). We also demonstrate that barriers reduce the spread of invasion at a comparable cost to removal. We hypothesize that increased reservoir elevation inundates springs hydrologically connected to the cave and this may be the invasion source. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Management and Control of Invasive Crayfish (Crustacea))
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Open AccessArticle
Development of PVC Dispensers for Long-Lasting Release of Attractants for the Control of Invasive Crayfish Populations
Diversity 2018, 10(4), 128; https://doi.org/10.3390/d10040128
Received: 29 October 2018 / Revised: 4 December 2018 / Accepted: 5 December 2018 / Published: 7 December 2018
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Abstract
Invasive alien species (IAS) are considered one of the major threats to biodiversity worldwide, thus requiring severe control strategies. Based on the promising results obtained in the field of insect pest management with polyvinyl chloride (PVC) for long-lasting release of attractants, the main [...] Read more.
Invasive alien species (IAS) are considered one of the major threats to biodiversity worldwide, thus requiring severe control strategies. Based on the promising results obtained in the field of insect pest management with polyvinyl chloride (PVC) for long-lasting release of attractants, the main aim of this study was to ascertain the efficacy of PVC/attractant dispensers also in the aquatic environment. Therefore, we developed PVC/food dispensers and evaluated their attractiveness, by means of behavioural bioassays on whole animals, over a 60-day period of continuous use towards the red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii, one of the top 100 worst IAS. The attractiveness in PVC of trehalose, leucine and taurocholic acid was also tested. Our results show that the PVC dispensers release the food and are strongly attractive for crayfish over a prolonged time, even if their effectiveness depends on the storage conditions: From 18 days when stored underwater at 23 °C up to 50 days when stored out of the water at −20 °C. Besides, trehalose, leucine and taurocholic acid in PVC resulted in reliable attractants for P. clarkii. The development of PVC dispensers for long-lasting release of attractants may help improve the efficiency of mass trapping strategies in the management and control of invasive crayfish. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Management and Control of Invasive Crayfish (Crustacea))
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Open AccessCommunication
The Red Alien vs. the Blue Destructor: The Eradication of Cherax destructor by Procambarus clarkii in Latium (Central Italy)
Diversity 2018, 10(4), 126; https://doi.org/10.3390/d10040126
Received: 31 October 2018 / Revised: 24 November 2018 / Accepted: 29 November 2018 / Published: 30 November 2018
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Abstract
Cherax destructor is a crayfish endemic to south-eastern Australia and one of the last alien crayfish to be introduced in Italy. In the Laghi di Ninfa Natural Reserve (Latium region, Central Italy), the species was probably introduced in 1999, but only reported for [...] Read more.
Cherax destructor is a crayfish endemic to south-eastern Australia and one of the last alien crayfish to be introduced in Italy. In the Laghi di Ninfa Natural Reserve (Latium region, Central Italy), the species was probably introduced in 1999, but only reported for the first time in 2008. Nearby this area, the most widespread alien crayfish is the red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii. In the Natural Reserve, between 2008 and 2013 and during spring and summer, crayfish sampling was carried out with baited traps to assess the distribution of C. destructor and its possible relationship with P. clarkii. Cherax destructor was first recorded in 2008; few P. clarkii were detected in the cultivation ponds where C. destructor was present in 2012 and 2013. Moreover, crayfish plague analyses evidenced a positive result in two out of the 12 sampled P. clarkii. Cherax destructor is now completely absent from the Natural Reserve, while P. clarkii has spread in the area and was probably responsible for this eradication since C. destructor is vulnerable to crayfish plague which was also detected in the area. An ecosystem restoration project in the area favoured the spread of. P. clarkii; the implications of this intervention are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Management and Control of Invasive Crayfish (Crustacea))
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Detection and Control of Invasive Freshwater Crayfish: From Traditional to Innovative Methods
Diversity 2019, 11(1), 5; https://doi.org/10.3390/d11010005
Received: 7 November 2018 / Revised: 18 December 2018 / Accepted: 28 December 2018 / Published: 4 January 2019
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Abstract
Invasive alien species are widespread in freshwater systems compared to terrestrial ecosystems. Among crustaceans, crayfish in particular have been widely introduced and are considered a major threat to freshwater ecosystem functioning. New emerging techniques for detecting and controlling invasive crayfish and protecting endangered [...] Read more.
Invasive alien species are widespread in freshwater systems compared to terrestrial ecosystems. Among crustaceans, crayfish in particular have been widely introduced and are considered a major threat to freshwater ecosystem functioning. New emerging techniques for detecting and controlling invasive crayfish and protecting endangered native species are; thus, now highly desirable and several are under evaluation. Important innovations have been developed in recent years for detection of both invasive and native crayfish, mainly through eDNA, which allows for the detection of the target species even at low abundance levels and when not directly observable. Forecasting models have also moved towards the creation of realistic invasion scenarios, allowing effective management plans to be developed in advance of invasions. The importance of monitoring the spread and impacts of crayfish and pathogens in developing national data and research networks is emphasised; here “citizen science” can also play a role. Emerging techniques are still being considered in the field of invasive crayfish control. Although for decades the main traditional techniques to manage invasive crayfish were solely based on trapping, since 2010 biological, biocidal, autocidal controls and sexual attractants, monosex populations, RNA interference, the sterile male release technique and oral delivery have all also been investigated for crayfish control. In this review, ongoing methodologies applied to the detection and management of invasive crayfish are discussed, highlighting their benefits and limitations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Management and Control of Invasive Crayfish (Crustacea))
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