Special Issue "Craniofacial Biology for Tooth Repair and Regeneration"

A special issue of Dentistry Journal (ISSN 2304-6767).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (29 February 2016)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Ana Angelova Volponi

Department of Craniofacial Development and Stem Cell Biology, King's College University of London, Guy's Hospital Tower, Floor 27, London SE1 9RT, UK
Website 1 | Website 2 | E-Mail
Phone: +44 (0) 2071888029
Interests: dental stem cells; tissue engineering (creation of bio-teth using different tissue and organ engineeing techniques)
Co-Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Paul T. Sharpe

Department of Craniofacial Development and Stem Cell Biology, King's College University of London, Guy's Hospital Tower, Floor 27, London SE1 9RT, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: molecular control of tooth development/tissue engineering; dental stem cells

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Regenerative Dentistry is emerging as a new research-oriented field of Dentistry, promoting the development of treatments that enhance the body’s own repair mechanisms. It is a new concept that challenges modern dentistry to step-up dental research, translating it into new clinical treatments. The “Regenerative Dentistry approach” is based on the development of cell-based therapy, tissue engineering, and organ engineering, employing a knowledge of craniofacial and stem cell biology.

We are facing continuous progress in the application of dental stem cells in these therapies, where we can accelerate the repair and regeneration of dental tissues by using cells to deliver growth factors or cellular signals or to directly provide stem cells that are able to differentiate (become) multiple cell types.

The following specific areas will be discussed: (i) cellular and molecular biology of tissue repair; (ii) mechanisms of recruitment and stem cell niche in craniofacial tissue; (iii) recent advances, challenges and future directions in craniofacial development research and stem cell biology.

Ana Angelova Volponi and Paul T. Sharpe
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Dentistry Journal is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Dental Stem Cells
  • Regeneration
  • Repair
  • Stem cell niche
  • Craniofacial biology
  • Stem cell biology
  • Regenerative Dentistry

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview
iPS Cells—The Triumphs and Tribulations
Dent. J. 2016, 4(2), 19; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj4020019
Received: 1 March 2016 / Revised: 18 May 2016 / Accepted: 27 May 2016 / Published: 6 June 2016
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (2910 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The year 2006 will be remembered monumentally in science, particularly in the stem cell biology field, for the first instance of generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from mouse embryonic/adult fibroblasts being reported by Takahashi and Yamanaka. A year later, human iPSCs [...] Read more.
The year 2006 will be remembered monumentally in science, particularly in the stem cell biology field, for the first instance of generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from mouse embryonic/adult fibroblasts being reported by Takahashi and Yamanaka. A year later, human iPSCs (hiPSCs) were generated from adult human skin fibroblasts by using quartet of genes, Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc. This revolutionary technology won Yamanaka Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine in 2012. Like human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), iPSCs are pluripotent and have the capability for self-renewal. Moreover, complications of immune rejection for therapeutic applications would be greatly eliminated by generating iPSCs from individual patients. This has enabled their use for drug screening/discovery and disease modelling in vitro; and for immunotherapy and regenerative cellular therapies in vivo, paving paths for new therapeutics. Although this breakthrough technology has a huge potential, generation of these unusual cells is still slow, ineffectual, fraught with pitfalls, and unsafe for human use. In this review, I describe how iPSCs are being triumphantly used to lay foundation for a fully functional discipline of regenerative dentistry and medicine, alongside discussing the challenges of translating therapies into clinics. I also discuss their future implications in regenerative dentistry field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Craniofacial Biology for Tooth Repair and Regeneration)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessReview
Tooth Organ Bioengineering: Cell Sources and Innovative Approaches
Dent. J. 2016, 4(2), 18; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj4020018
Received: 24 February 2016 / Revised: 22 May 2016 / Accepted: 27 May 2016 / Published: 2 June 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (214 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Various treatment approaches for restoring missing teeth are being utilized nowadays by using artificial dental crowns/bridges or the use of dental implants. All aforementioned restorative modalities are considered to be the conventional way of treating such cases. Although these artificial therapies are commonly [...] Read more.
Various treatment approaches for restoring missing teeth are being utilized nowadays by using artificial dental crowns/bridges or the use of dental implants. All aforementioned restorative modalities are considered to be the conventional way of treating such cases. Although these artificial therapies are commonly used for tooth loss rehabilitation, they are still less conservative, show less biocompatibility and fail to restore the natural biological and physiological function. Adding to that, they are considered to be costly due to the risk of failure and they also require regular maintenance. Regenerative dentistry is currently considered a novel therapeutic concept with high potential for a complete recovery of the natural function and esthetics of teeth. Biological-cell based dental therapies would involve replacement of teeth by using stem cells that will ultimately grow a bioengineered tooth, thereby restoring both the biological and physiological functions of the natural tooth, and are considered to be the ultimate goal in regenerative dentistry. In this review, various stem cell-based therapeutic approaches for tooth organ bioengineering will be discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Craniofacial Biology for Tooth Repair and Regeneration)
Open AccessReview
Regenerative Perspective in Modern Dentistry
Dent. J. 2016, 4(2), 10; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj4020010
Received: 24 February 2016 / Revised: 16 April 2016 / Accepted: 21 April 2016 / Published: 25 April 2016
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Abstract
This review aims to trace the contour lines of regenerative dentistry, to offer an introductory overview on this emerging field to both dental students and practitioners. The crystallized depiction of the concept is a translational approach, connecting dental academics to scientific research and [...] Read more.
This review aims to trace the contour lines of regenerative dentistry, to offer an introductory overview on this emerging field to both dental students and practitioners. The crystallized depiction of the concept is a translational approach, connecting dental academics to scientific research and clinical utility. Therefore, this review begins by presenting the general features of regenerative medicine, and then gradually introduces the specific aspects of major dental subdomains, highlighting the progress achieved during the last years by scientific research and, in some cases, which has already been translated into clinical results. The distinct characteristics of stem cells and their microenvironment, together with their diversity in the oral cavity, are put into the context of research and clinical use. Examples of regenerative studies regarding endodontic and periodontal compartments, as well as hard (alveolar bone) and soft (salivary glands) related tissues, are presented to make the reader further acquainted with the topic. Instead of providing a conclusion, we will emphasize the importance for all dental community members, from young students to experienced dentists, of an early awareness rising regarding biomedical research progress in general and regenerative dentistry in particular. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Craniofacial Biology for Tooth Repair and Regeneration)
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