Special Issue "New Perspectives on Dental Anxiety: Theoretical Concepts, Assessments and Interventions"

A special issue of Dentistry Journal (ISSN 2304-6767).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Ruth E. Freeman
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Dental Health Services Research Unit, Dundee Dental Hospital and School, University of Dundee, Dundee, UK
Interests: dental anxiety in children and adults; inclusion oral health; oral health services for excluded groups; intensive psychotherapeutic intervention; dental staff well-being and communication.
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Gerry M. Humphris
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Health Psychology, School of Medicine, University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews, UK
Interests: Assessment of dental anxiety; psychometrics; frequent psychological evaluation; sequential analysis; patient-centred care; health care communication; emotional expression; clinical responsiveness

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Dental anxiety is not disappearing with the advent of new methods, devices and materials to offer oral health care. However, new techniques of assessment (e.g., online) and methods of intervention abound as do the theoretical perspectives that are being investigated. The Guest Editors of this Special Issue aim to compile a set of articles that reflect some of the latest work on this topic and have invited known experts as well as generated a call for open submissions of high-quality writing and research endeavour. It is hoped that this collection will act as a reference point for scholars in the field and attract further interest to assist clinicians in assisting their patients who have a fear of dentistry. This currently has some importance as patients and clinicians battle with the additional fear of COVID-19 and its possible effect on dental anxiety.This Special Issue, therefore, will provide the reader with a synopsis of new perspectives on dental anxiety. It will present an examination of new theoretical concepts, assessments and interventions. Researchers from around the globe will use this as a forum to share their current thinking, their research activity and practical interventions in the clinical field of dental anxiety.

Prof. Ruth E. Freeman
Prof. Dr. Gerry M. Humphris
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Dentistry Journal is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • dental anxiety
  • dental fear
  • theoretical perspectives
  • assessment development
  • trajectory of dental anxiety
  • dentist–patient relationship
  • clinical communication
  • psychological interventions
  • development of dental anxiety
  • life course

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
A Short Form of the Children’s Experiences of Dental Anxiety Measure (CEDAM): Validation and Evaluation of the CEDAM-8
Dent. J. 2021, 9(6), 71; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj9060071 - 15 Jun 2021
Viewed by 1068
Abstract
Background: The Children’s Experiences of Dental Anxiety Measure (CEDAM-14) is a child-centred measure of dental anxiety which assesses a range of behaviours, thoughts and feelings/physical symptoms related to dental anxiety. A short form of the CEDAM-14, which places less time burden on patients [...] Read more.
Background: The Children’s Experiences of Dental Anxiety Measure (CEDAM-14) is a child-centred measure of dental anxiety which assesses a range of behaviours, thoughts and feelings/physical symptoms related to dental anxiety. A short form of the CEDAM-14, which places less time burden on patients and clinicians, could promote the feasibility and applicability of the CEDAM in clinical settings. The aim of the study was to develop a short version of the CEDAM that can be used to assess children’s dental anxiety in clinical practice. Methods: A short version of the CEDAM was developed using a combination of item impact and regression methods. Measurement properties including floor/ceiling effects, variance, criterion validity, construct validity and internal consistency was calculated for the short form. Results: An eight-item CEDAM short form was developed (CEDAM-8) that had good psychometric properties, was significantly correlated with the CEDAM measure (r = 0.90; p < 0.01), had minimal floor and ceiling effects (3.5% and 1.2%, respectively) and was sensitive to change. Conclusion: The CEDAM-8 is a useful assessment tool for clinicians that is easy and quick to administer and could help to understand children’s experiences of dental anxiety and changes in anxiety over time and following intervention. Full article
Article
Hair Cortisol Concentrations Are Associated with Dental Anxiety during Pregnancy
Dent. J. 2021, 9(4), 42; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj9040042 - 11 Apr 2021
Viewed by 753
Abstract
Dental anxiety (DA) and hair cortisol concentrations (HCC) are associated with psychological symptoms and vary during pregnancy. We aimed to examine the association between HCC and DA at two points of pregnancy. Participants were pregnant mothers (n = 533) drawn from the FinnBrain [...] Read more.
Dental anxiety (DA) and hair cortisol concentrations (HCC) are associated with psychological symptoms and vary during pregnancy. We aimed to examine the association between HCC and DA at two points of pregnancy. Participants were pregnant mothers (n = 533) drawn from the FinnBrain Birth Cohort Study donating a hair sample at gestational week (gwk) 24 (n = 442) and/or at delivery (n = 176) and completed questionnaires on DA. Two groups, HCC1 and HCC2, treated as separate in the analyses, were formed according to the hair sample donation time i.e., gwk24 and delivery. 85 subjects were included in both groups. MDAS, EPDS, and SCL-90 were used to measure DA, depressive and anxiety symptoms, respectively, at gwk14 for the HCC1 group and gwk34 for the HCC2 group. The association between DA and HCC was studied with a binary logistic regression model, adjusted for anxiety and depressive symptoms, age, BMI, and smoking status. Individuals with high DA had lower HCC levels at gwk24 (OR = 0.548; 95% CI = 0.35–0.86; p = 0.009), but the association was not statistically significant at the delivery (OR = 0.611; 95% CI = 0.28–1.33; p = 0.216). The independent association between HCC and DA in pregnant women suggests that long-term cortisol levels could play a role in the endogenous etiology of DA. Further studies are however, needed. Full article
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