Special Issue "Management of Peri-Implantitis"

A special issue of Dentistry Journal (ISSN 2304-6767).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Stefano Corbella
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Biomedical, Surgical and Dental Sciences, Università degli Studi di Milano – Dental Clinic IRCCS Istituto Ortopedico Galeazzi, 20161 Milan, Italy
2. Department of Oral Surgery, Institute of Dentistry, I. M. Sechenov First Moscow state medical University, 119435 Moscow, Russia
Interests: implant dentistry; peri-implant diseases; biomaterials; bone regeneration; evidence-based dentistry
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Silvio Taschieri
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Biomedical, Surgical and Dental Sciences, Università degli Studi di Milano – Dental Clinic IRCCS Istituto Ortopedico Galeazzi, 20161 Milan, Italy
2. Department of Oral Surgery, Institute of Dentistry, I. M. Sechenov First Moscow state medical University, 119435 Moscow, Russia
Interests: implant dentistry; oral surgery; bone augmentation; peri-implantitis
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue entitled “Management of Peri-Implantitis” will cover all the aspects related to the epidemiology, diagnosis, prevention, treatment, and prognosis of peri-implantitis.

Dental implants should be considered a safe and effective treatment option to solve partial and full edentulism, by supporting fixed or removable dental prosthesis. However, both technical and biological complications may affect the outcome of implant-supported restorations, thus reducing implant survival and success rate.

Dental implant biological complications were peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis. Peri-implant mucositis is a reversible inflammatory condition affecting peri-implant soft tissues, and it is characterized by bleeding, swelling and, eventually, suppuration, without any sign of bone resorption. Peri-implantitis was defined as one pathologic condition correlated to the presence of dental plaque; it is characterized by inflammation of the peri-implant mucosa and progressive marginal bone loss. Peri-implantitis was found to be correlated to the presence of plaque (namely to poor oral hygiene) and to history of periodontitis. The effect of other risk factors (systemic diseases and conditions and smoking status) remains controversial. Its reported prevalence varies largely because of the different definitions of peri-implantitis adopted in published studies.

The treatment of peri-implantitis should imply the removal of the noxious agent and the detoxification of implant surface, aiming at arresting the bone resorption process. Both nonsurgical and surgical treatment options were proposed to treat lesions from peri-implantitis. Moreover, both resective and regenerative approaches were applied to treat the bony lesion.

For this Special Issue, all papers about all clinical and research aspects related to peri-implantitis will be considered. A strict research protocol is required for all articles considered, and papers describing innovations in clinical management of peri-implantitis will be preferred. For the Special Issue, critical and systematic reviews, case report and case series, clinical studies, and basic research studies will be accepted.

Dr. Corbella Stefano
Dr. Silvio Taschieri
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Dentistry Journal is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • peri-implant mucositis
  • peri-implantitis
  • regenerative surgery
  • peri-implant diseases
  • prevention

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Other

Article
Prevalence of Peri-Implantitis: A Multi-Centered Cross-Sectional Study on 248 Patients
Dent. J. 2020, 8(3), 80; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj8030080 - 03 Aug 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1425
Abstract
The aim of this multicenter cross-sectional study was to determine the prevalence of peri-implantitis and to assess its association with several patient- and implant-related factors. Patients with at least one implant, who came for a recall visit to one of the four centers [...] Read more.
The aim of this multicenter cross-sectional study was to determine the prevalence of peri-implantitis and to assess its association with several patient- and implant-related factors. Patients with at least one implant, who came for a recall visit to one of the four centers over a period of five months, were enrolled. Presence of peri-implantitis (defined as bleeding on probing, exudate/suppuration, bone loss > 0.2 mm/year and increased pocket depth) and several other variables (e.g., smoking habits, history of periodontitis, diabetes) were recorded. Out of 248 enrolled patients (1162 implants), 10 patients had at least one implant with peri-implantitis (4.03%); a total of 14 implants were affected (1.20%). A statistically significant association between peri-implantitis and diabetes was found (OR 8.65; CI: 1.94–38.57). Smoking more than 10 cigarettes per day (OR: 0.53; CI 0.03–9.45) and history of periodontitis (OR: 2.42; CI: 0.49–11.89) were not found to be statistically associated with peri-implantitis. Even if implant therapy is a consolidated treatment, biological complications do happen. Strict supportive therapy recalls could lead to lower rates of peri-implantitis and earlier diagnosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Management of Peri-Implantitis)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Influence of Diabetes on Implant Failure and Peri-Implant Diseases: A Retrospective Study
Dent. J. 2020, 8(3), 70; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj8030070 - 04 Jul 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1098
Abstract
Diabetes is an important modifying factor of periodontitis, but its association with peri-implant diseases has not been fully explored and the existing literature reports controversial results. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the influence of diabetes on peri-implantitis and implant [...] Read more.
Diabetes is an important modifying factor of periodontitis, but its association with peri-implant diseases has not been fully explored and the existing literature reports controversial results. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the influence of diabetes on peri-implantitis and implant failure. Smoking status, history of periodontal disease, presence of diabetes, diabetes type, therapy and glycaemia levels were collected in a total of 204 subjects treated with 929 implants, with a mean follow-up time of 5.7 ± 3.82 years after loading. Odds ratio (OR) for diabetes as a direct cause of peri-implantitis and implant failure were calculated, adjusted for smoking status and history of periodontitis. Nineteen patients were diabetic and most of them presented a good control of the disease at the time of surgery. The overall patient-level prevalence of peri-implantitis was 11.3%. Among diabetic patients, one developed peri-implantitis, whereas one experienced multiple implant failures. The calculated ORs, adjusted for smoking status and periodontitis, were not statistically significant. The results revealed no association between diabetes and peri-implantitis or implant failure coherently with the existing scientific literature. The actual influence of hyperglycemia on implant failure is still uncertain and new studies with larger cohorts of patients are needed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Management of Peri-Implantitis)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Study of Treatment Methods for Surrounding Soft Tissues of Implants Following Mandibular Reconstructions with Fibula-Free Flaps
Dent. J. 2020, 8(3), 67; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj8030067 - 03 Jul 2020
Viewed by 945
Abstract
In maxillofacial reconstruction implant treatment, unsatisfactory soft tissue treatment of the area around the implant may lead to inflammation. As a result, appropriate soft tissue treatment is critical. To the best of our knowledge, there are no studies that compare the different tissue [...] Read more.
In maxillofacial reconstruction implant treatment, unsatisfactory soft tissue treatment of the area around the implant may lead to inflammation. As a result, appropriate soft tissue treatment is critical. To the best of our knowledge, there are no studies that compare the different tissue treatment methods available. Hence, in this study, we compare three soft tissue treatment methods around implants after mandibular reconstruction is achieved with a fibula-free flap. Out of 33 patients who underwent mandible reconstruction using fibula-free flaps between 2006 and 2015, 5 were selected for this study. A total of 17 implants were used for treatment by the final prosthetics of the five patients. Three soft tissue treatment methods with free gingival graft (FGG) were evaluated, namely, installing a splint in a modified abutment to protect the wounded area during a palatal mucosa transplant (method 1), installing a splint or dentures to a locator abutment (method 2), and the use of screw-in fixed dentures (method 3). The method that could guarantee the widest keratinized mucosa was the screw-in fixed denture method. The results of our study indicated that employing screw-in fixed dentures for FGG may be a useful soft tissue treatment for mandible reconstruction implants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Management of Peri-Implantitis)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Biofilm Formation on Dental Implant Surface Treated by Implantoplasty: An In Situ Study
Dent. J. 2020, 8(2), 40; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj8020040 - 06 May 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1115
Abstract
Peri-implantitis is a biofilm-related disease whose characteristics are peri-implant tissues inflammation and bone resorption. Some clinical trials report beneficial effects after implantoplasty, namely the surgical smoothening of the implant surface, but there is a lack of data about the development of the bacterial [...] Read more.
Peri-implantitis is a biofilm-related disease whose characteristics are peri-implant tissues inflammation and bone resorption. Some clinical trials report beneficial effects after implantoplasty, namely the surgical smoothening of the implant surface, but there is a lack of data about the development of the bacterial biofilm on those smoothened surfaces. The aim of this study is to evaluate how implantoplasty influences biofilm formation. Three implants with moderately rough surfaces (control) and three implants treated with implantoplasty (test) were set on a tray reproducing the supra- and sub-gingival environment. One volunteer wore this tray for five days. Every 24 h, plaque coverage was measured and, at the end of the period of observartion, the implant surfaces were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The proportion of implant surface covered with plaque was 65% (SD = 7.07) of the control implants and 16% (SD = 0) of the test implants. Untreated surfaces showed mature, complex biofilm structures with wide morphological diversity, and treated surfaces did not show the formation of mature biofilm structures. This study supports the efficacy of implantoplasty in reducing plaque adhesion and influencing biofilm formation. These results can be considered a preliminary proof of concept, but they may encourage further studies about the effects of implantoplasty on biofilm formation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Management of Peri-Implantitis)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research

Case Report
Nonsurgical Treatment of Peri-Implantitis: Case Series
Dent. J. 2020, 8(3), 78; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj8030078 - 27 Jul 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1766
Abstract
Peri-implantitis is one of the most important biological complication of dental implants. It has inflammatory nature, proved association with plaque accumulation in peri-implant tissues, and can be progressive on background of several factors, like comorbidity factors and bad habits. The prophylaxis and different [...] Read more.
Peri-implantitis is one of the most important biological complication of dental implants. It has inflammatory nature, proved association with plaque accumulation in peri-implant tissues, and can be progressive on background of several factors, like comorbidity factors and bad habits. The prophylaxis and different methods of treatment were discussed during last 30 years, and surgical and nonsurgical techniques have their foes, benefits, and disadvantages. In this article, we describe the case series of various nonsurgical treatments of peri-implantitis with the use of protocols based on the application of local antibiotics (doxycycline, lincomycin, and erythromycin), mechanical and chemical debridement of dental implant surface, and mini-invasive regenerative technique with injections of bovine collagen. All these three cases demonstrated good results with the maintenance of bone level and absence of clinical signs of inflammation for at least a year according to the X-ray imaging (bone defect volume) and clinic assessments (probing depth, bleeding or suppuration, mucosa color, and pain presence). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Management of Peri-Implantitis)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop