Microbial Safety of Milk and Dairy Products

A special issue of Dairy (ISSN 2624-862X). This special issue belongs to the section "Dairy Microbiota".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 September 2023) | Viewed by 3040

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Guest Editor
National Research Council of Italy, Institute of Sciences of Food Production, CNR-ISPA, Bari, Italy
Interests: food safety and quality; probiotics; foodborne pathogenic bacteria; S. aureus; A. butzleri; molecular methods; genomics; milk and dairy products
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Keywords

  • microbial safety
  • pathogenic bacteria
  • milk cheese
  • molecular methods
  • genomics

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 985 KiB  
Article
Antimicrobial Activity of Selected Essential Oils against Staphylococcus aureus from Bovine Mastitis
by Karen Vanessa Munive Nuñez, Anderson Clayton da Silva Abreu, Jaqueline Milagres de Almeida, Juliano Leonel Gonçalves, Érika Carolina Romão Bonsaglia, Marcos Veiga dos Santos and Nathália Cristina Cirone Silva
Dairy 2024, 5(1), 54-65; https://doi.org/10.3390/dairy5010005 - 05 Jan 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 978
Abstract
Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of subclinical mastitis in dairy cows, and its development of antibiotic resistance has limited treatment efficacy. Essential oils (EOs) are natural products with a wide range of antimicrobial properties that could be used to treat bovine mastitis. [...] Read more.
Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of subclinical mastitis in dairy cows, and its development of antibiotic resistance has limited treatment efficacy. Essential oils (EOs) are natural products with a wide range of antimicrobial properties that could be used to treat bovine mastitis. This study aims to investigate the antimicrobial activity of EOs against S. aureus isolated from subclinical bovine mastitis cases in the State of São Paulo—Brazil. A total of 14 S. aureus isolates were selected, based on the presence of biofilm-forming genes (icaA, icaD, and bap), and were cultured to a final concentration of 103 CFU.mL−1 for the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) analysis of five EOs (Citrus aurantium bergamia—bergamot, Copaifera reticulata—copaiba, Foeniculum vulgare—fennel, Zingiber officinale—ginger, and Ocimum basilicum—basil). The chemical compositions of the EOs were characterized using gas chromatography coupled with a mass-selective detector (GC/MSD). Basil and bergamot EOs exhibited the highest antimicrobial activity against S. aureus strains, with mean MIC/MBC values of 1.561 ± 0.223/2.806 ± 0.255 mg.mL−1 and 2.782 ± 0.228/4.396 ± 0.198 mg.mL−1, respectively. The primary compounds in basil EO were methyl-chavicol, linalool, and α-humulene, while bergamot EO predominantly contained linalyl acetate, limonene, and linalool. This research highlights the potential of basil and bergamot EOs as natural antimicrobial agents for treating bovine mastitis caused by S. aureus, offering a potential alternative to traditional antibiotics and contributing to animal welfare and public health. In addition, it emphasizes the need for further studies to validate the long-term effects, optimal dosages, and application methods. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbial Safety of Milk and Dairy Products)
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13 pages, 4096 KiB  
Article
Virulence Potential, Biofilm Formation, and Disinfectants Control of Escherichia coli from Raw Milk Bulk Tanks in the Southeast of Brazil
by Sâmea Joaquim Aguiar Soares, Felipe de Freitas Guimarães, Gabriel Augusto Marques Rossi, Simony Trevizan Guerra, Felipe Morales Dalanezi, Bruna Churocof Lopes, Mateus de Souza Ribeiro Mioni, Ana Carolina Yamakawa, Evelyn Cristine da Silva, Gustavo Nunes de Moraes, Amanda Bezerra Bertolini, Márcio Garcia Ribeiro, José Carlos de Figueiredo Pantoja, Simone Baldini Lucheis, Vera Lucia Mores Rall, Rodrigo Tavanelli Hernandes, Domingos da Silva Leite and Helio Langoni
Dairy 2023, 4(4), 541-553; https://doi.org/10.3390/dairy4040037 - 03 Oct 2023
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Abstract
Escherichia coli is a major player in foodborne illnesses, capable of forming biofilms on dairy facilities, leading to milk contamination. Thus, we examined the capacity of E. coli strains from raw milk bulk tanks to form biofilms on surfaces made of polystyrene, stainless [...] Read more.
Escherichia coli is a major player in foodborne illnesses, capable of forming biofilms on dairy facilities, leading to milk contamination. Thus, we examined the capacity of E. coli strains from raw milk bulk tanks to form biofilms on surfaces made of polystyrene, stainless steel, and silicone; the potential links between biofilm formation with genes responsible for fimbriae and virulence factors of extra-intestinal E. coli (ExPEC); and the susceptibility of biofilm-forming isolates to iodine and chlorhexidine digluconate. Out of 149 E. coli strains, 42.28% (63/149) formed biofilm on polystyrene, 56.38% (84/149) on silicone, and 21.48% (32/149) on stainless steel. The frequency of genes was: fimH (100%), hlyA (5.4%), irp2 (2.7%), sitA (10.7%), ompT (43.6%), and traT (98%). No biofilm developed when disinfectants were used prior to biofilm formation. However, iodine and chlorhexidine digluconate allowed 25.40% (16/63) of isolates displaying growth after a mature biofilm was formed. The presence of biofilm on different surfaces emphasizes the vital need for thorough equipment cleaning, both in farms and in industrial dairy settings. Rapid disinfection is crucial, given the reduced susceptibility of potentially pathogenic E. coli after biofilm maturity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbial Safety of Milk and Dairy Products)
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