Special Issue "Phononics"

A special issue of Crystals (ISSN 2073-4352). This special issue belongs to the section "Crystalline Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 December 2017)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Abdelkrim Khelif

Institut FEMTO-ST, CNRS, Université de Bourgogne Franche-Comté, 15B Avenue des Montboucons, 25030 Besancon Cedex, France
Website | E-Mail
Interests: acoustic metamaterials; phononic crystals; acoustic device
Guest Editor
Dr. Sarah Benchabane

FEMTO-ST Institute, 15B Avenue des Montboucons, 25030 Besançon Cedex, France
Website | E-Mail
Interests: phononic crystals; micro-nano-resonators; optomechanics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The study of the interaction of acoustic waves with periodic structures has a long history: The first investigations can be found in one of the pioneering contributions of Lord Rayleigh, back in 1887, and the study of vibrations in crystals is at the core of solid state physics, and is as topical as ever, despite it being a century-old, discipline.

More than two decades ago, inspired by the rise and success of photonic crystals, vibrations in periodic structures were considered anew, giving birth to the field of Phononic Crystals. By engineering artificial materials, particularly by tuning their mechanical properties in a periodic, crystal-like fashion, unique dispersion characteristics can be found that cannot be observed in bulk counterparts. Periodicity can lead to acoustic or elastic band gaps due to Bragg scattering; introduction of defects has led to demonstrations of strong wave localization in cavities or waveguides; dispersion engineering has opened the path towards slow sound, sub-wavelength focusing or self-collimation. The physics of phononic crystals have been further enriched by the concept of locally-resonant crystals, where the resonance properties of the scattering unit play the leading role in band gap formation, bringing the characteristic dimensions of the crystal to a sub-wavelength scale.

The capacity to control of elastic or acoustic waves has then attained an unprecedented level. Phononics has now reached some degree of maturity, providing a wide range of opportunities in different domains of applications. The very nature of elastic and acoustic waves, their natural extension over a widest scale of wavelength and hence frequencies, promise as many potential fields of use for phononic crystals, ranging from structural vibrations to radio-frequency telecommunications, through micro-electromechanical systems and ultrasound acoustics, to name but a few.

This Special Issue of Crystals, therefore, intends to give some of the most important advances in the field of phononics in the last few years, providing a state-of-the-art of the field from material, device, and application perspectives.

Dr. Abdelkrim Khelif
Dr. Sarah Benchabane
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Crystals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Phononic crystals

  • Phononic band gaps, cavities and waveguides

  • Micro and nano resonators

  • Phononic-fluidic interactions

  • Granular phononics

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (11 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-11
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Band Structures Analysis of Elastic Waves Propagating along Thickness Direction in Periodically Laminated Piezoelectric Composites
Crystals 2018, 8(9), 351; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst8090351
Received: 18 July 2018 / Revised: 12 August 2018 / Accepted: 20 August 2018 / Published: 1 September 2018
PDF Full-text (11096 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Existing studies on elastic waves in periodically laminated piezoelectric structures mainly concerned the passive band properties, since the electrical boundaries in the considered structures cannot vary. This paper investigates the tuning of band properties of uncoupled primary and shear (P- and S-) waves [...] Read more.
Existing studies on elastic waves in periodically laminated piezoelectric structures mainly concerned the passive band properties, since the electrical boundaries in the considered structures cannot vary. This paper investigates the tuning of band properties of uncoupled primary and shear (P- and S-) waves along the thickness direction by actively varying the electrical field in periodically multilayered piezoelectric structures consisting of orthotropic materials. The alteration of the electrical field is realized in the multilayered unit cell here by either applying or switching four kinds of electrical boundary conditions, including the electric-open, applied electric capacitance, electric-short, and applied feedback voltage, to the constituent piezoelectric layer via the constituent electrode layers covering both its surfaces. First, the state space formalism is introduced to obtain the partial wave solution of any constituent orthotropic layer in the unit cell. Second, the traditional transfer matrix method is adopted to derive the dispersion equation of general, periodically laminated piezoelectric composites with unit cells consisting of an arbitrary number of piezoelectric layers with various boundaries and of elastic layers. Third, numerical examples are provided to verify the proposed analysis method, and to study the influences of electrode thickness as well as four electrical boundaries on the band structures. All the frequency-related dispersion curves are also illustrated by numerical examples to summarize the general dispersion characteristics of uncoupled P- and S-waves in periodically laminated piezoelectric composites. The main finding is that the innovative dispersion characteristic resulting from the negative capacitance may also be achieved via feedback control. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Phononics)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessCommunication A Phononic Crystal-Based High Frequency Rheometer
Crystals 2018, 8(5), 195; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst8050195
Received: 16 March 2018 / Revised: 19 April 2018 / Accepted: 29 April 2018 / Published: 1 May 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1719 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) allows for the measurement of the complex shear modulus of an elastomer. Measurements at frequencies above the frequency range of the device can be reached thanks to the Time–Temperature Equivalence principle. Yet, frequencies higher than a few kHz are [...] Read more.
Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) allows for the measurement of the complex shear modulus of an elastomer. Measurements at frequencies above the frequency range of the device can be reached thanks to the Time–Temperature Equivalence principle. Yet, frequencies higher than a few kHz are not attainable. Here, we propose a method exploiting the physics of bubble phononic crystals to measure the complex shear modulus at frequencies of a few tens of kHz. The idea is to fabricate a phononic crystal by creating a period arrangement of bubbles in the elastomer of interest, here PolyDiMethylSiloxane (PDMS), and to measure its transmission against frequency. Fitting the results with an analytic model provides both the loss and storage moduli. Physically, the shear storage modulus drives the position of the dip observed in transmission while the loss modulus controls the damping, and thus the level of transmission. Using this method, we are able to compare the high-frequency rheological properties of two commercial PDMS and to monitor the ageing process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Phononics)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Analysis of Bending Waves in Phononic Crystal Beams with Defects
Crystals 2018, 8(1), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst8010021
Received: 15 October 2017 / Revised: 21 December 2017 / Accepted: 3 January 2018 / Published: 6 January 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (4959 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Existing investigations on imperfect phononic crystal beams mainly concern periodic multi-span beams carrying either one or two channel waves with random or deterministic disorder in span-length. This paper studies the two channel bending waves in phononic crystal beams consisting of many phases of [...] Read more.
Existing investigations on imperfect phononic crystal beams mainly concern periodic multi-span beams carrying either one or two channel waves with random or deterministic disorder in span-length. This paper studies the two channel bending waves in phononic crystal beams consisting of many phases of materials with defects introduced as one structural segment having different cross-sectional dimensions or material parameters. The method of reverberation-ray matrix (MRRM) based on the Timoshenko beam theory, which can conduct high-frequency analysis, is extended for the theoretical analysis of dispersion and transmission of bending waves. The supercell technique and the Floquet–Bloch theorem are adopted for modeling the dispersion characteristics, and the whole finite structural model is used to calculate the transmission spectra. Experimental measurements and numerical calculations are provided to validate the displacement transmission obtained by the proposed MRRM, with the effect of damping on transmission spectra being concerned. The high-frequency calculation applicability of the proposed MRRM is also confirmed by comparing the present results with the corresponding ones either using the transfer matrix method (TMM) or MRRM based on Euler—Bernoulli beam theory. The influences of defect size, defect form, and unit-cell number on the transmission spectra and the band structures are discussed. The drawn conclusions may be useful for designing or evaluating the defected phononic crystal beams in bending wave control. In addition, our conclusions are especially potential for identifying the defect location through bending wave signals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Phononics)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Phononic Crystal Made of Multilayered Ridges on a Substrate for Rayleigh Waves Manipulation
Crystals 2017, 7(12), 372; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst7120372
Received: 6 November 2017 / Revised: 3 December 2017 / Accepted: 6 December 2017 / Published: 12 December 2017
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (4929 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
We present a phononic crystal to achieve efficient manipulation of surface acoustic waves (SAW). The structure is made of finite phononic micro-ridges arranged periodically in a substrate surface. Each ridge is constructed by staking silicon and tungsten layers so that it behaves as [...] Read more.
We present a phononic crystal to achieve efficient manipulation of surface acoustic waves (SAW). The structure is made of finite phononic micro-ridges arranged periodically in a substrate surface. Each ridge is constructed by staking silicon and tungsten layers so that it behaves as one-dimensional phononic crystal which exhibits band gaps for elastic waves. The band gap allows the existence of resonance modes where the elastic energy is either confined within units in the free end of the ridge or the ones in contact with the substrate. We show that SAW interaction with localized modes in the free surface of the ridge gives rise to sharp attenuation in the SAW transmission, while the modes confined within the ridge/substrate interface cause broad band attenuations of SAW. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the coupling between the two kinds of modes within the band gap gives high SAW transmission amplitude in the form of Fano-like peaks with high quality factor. The structure could provide an interesting solution for accurate SAW control for sensing applications, for instance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Phononics)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Experimental and Theoretical Investigation of Lowering the Band Gaps of Phononic Crystal Beams through Fluid-Solid Coupling
Crystals 2017, 7(12), 366; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst7120366
Received: 15 October 2017 / Revised: 20 November 2017 / Accepted: 6 December 2017 / Published: 8 December 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (3096 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
We experimentally and theoretically investigate the band-gap and transmission properties of phononic crystal (PC) beams immersed in water. Spectral element method (SEM) is developed for theoretical analysis in which the hydrodynamic loading is taken into consideration. Influence of the hydrodynamic loading on band-gap [...] Read more.
We experimentally and theoretically investigate the band-gap and transmission properties of phononic crystal (PC) beams immersed in water. Spectral element method (SEM) is developed for theoretical analysis in which the hydrodynamic loading is taken into consideration. Influence of the hydrodynamic loading on band-gap and transmission properties of the PC beams are studied. To directly detect the displacement transmission of a fully or partially submerged PC beam, a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) displacement sensing system is set up. Agreement between the experimental results and theoretical/numerical calculations also indicates the excellent dynamic sensing performance of the FBG sensing system in the research of the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problem. Obvious lowering of the band gaps due to fluid-solid coupling is clearly demonstrated. The results in this work might be useful in research such as active tuning of the band gap and transmission properties of the PCs through fluid-solid coupling. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Phononics)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Freeform Phononic Waveguides
Crystals 2017, 7(12), 353; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst7120353
Received: 15 October 2017 / Revised: 13 November 2017 / Accepted: 24 November 2017 / Published: 28 November 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (7277 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
We employ a recently introduced class of artificial structurally-disordered phononic structures that exhibit large and robust elastic frequency band gaps for efficient phonon guiding. Phononic crystals are periodic structures that prohibit the propagation of elastic waves through destructive interference and exhibit large band [...] Read more.
We employ a recently introduced class of artificial structurally-disordered phononic structures that exhibit large and robust elastic frequency band gaps for efficient phonon guiding. Phononic crystals are periodic structures that prohibit the propagation of elastic waves through destructive interference and exhibit large band gaps and ballistic propagation of elastic waves in the permitted frequency ranges. In contrast, random-structured materials do not exhibit band gaps and favour localization or diffusive propagation. Here, we use structures with correlated disorder constructed from the so-called stealthy hyperuniform disordered point patterns, which can smoothly vary from completely random to periodic (full order) by adjusting a single parameter. Such amorphous-like structures exhibit large band gaps (comparable to the periodic ones), both ballistic-like and diffusive propagation of elastic waves, and a large number of localized modes near the band edges. The presence of large elastic band gaps allows the creation of waveguides in hyperuniform materials, and we analyse various waveguide architectures displaying nearly 100% transmission in the GHz regime. Such phononic-circuit architectures are expected to have a direct impact on integrated micro-electro-mechanical filters and modulators for wireless communications and acousto-optical sensing applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Phononics)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Simultaneous Guidance of Surface Acoustic and Surface Optical Waves in Phoxonic Crystal Slabs
Crystals 2017, 7(11), 350; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst7110350
Received: 15 October 2017 / Revised: 5 November 2017 / Accepted: 15 November 2017 / Published: 19 November 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (5350 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Phoxonic crystals, which exhibit simultaneous phononic and photonic bandgaps, are promising artificial materials for optomechanical and acousto-optical devices. In this paper, simultaneous guidance of surface acoustic and surface optical waves in truncated phoxonic crystal slabs with veins is investigated using the finite element [...] Read more.
Phoxonic crystals, which exhibit simultaneous phononic and photonic bandgaps, are promising artificial materials for optomechanical and acousto-optical devices. In this paper, simultaneous guidance of surface acoustic and surface optical waves in truncated phoxonic crystal slabs with veins is investigated using the finite element method. The phoxonic crystal slabs with veins can show dual large bandgaps of phononic and photonic even/odd modes. Based on the phononic and photonic bandgaps, simultaneous surface acoustic and optical modes can be realized by changing the surface geometrical configurations. Both acoustic and optical energies can be highly confined in the surface region. The effect of the surface structures on the dispersion relations of surface modes is discussed; by adjusting the surface geometrical parameters, dual single guided modes and/or slow acoustic and optical waves with small group velocity dispersions can be achieved. The group velocities are about 40 and 10 times smaller than the transverse velocity of the elastic waves in silicon and the speed of light in vacuum, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Phononics)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Design and Fabrication Challenges for Millimeter-Scale Three-Dimensional Phononic Crystals
Crystals 2017, 7(11), 348; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst7110348
Received: 16 October 2017 / Revised: 9 November 2017 / Accepted: 11 November 2017 / Published: 15 November 2017
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (5665 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
While phononic crystals can be theoretically modeled with a variety of analytical and numerical methods, the practical realization and comprehensive characterization of complex designs is often challenging. This is especially important for the nearly limitless possibilities of periodic, three-dimensional structures. In this contribution, [...] Read more.
While phononic crystals can be theoretically modeled with a variety of analytical and numerical methods, the practical realization and comprehensive characterization of complex designs is often challenging. This is especially important for the nearly limitless possibilities of periodic, three-dimensional structures. In this contribution, we take a look at these design and fabrication challenges of different 3D phononic elements based on recent research using additive manufacturing. Different fabrication technologies introduce specific limitations in terms of, e.g., material choices, minimum feature size, aspect ratios, or support requirements that have to be taken into account during design and theoretical modeling. We discuss advantages and disadvantages of additive technologies suitable for millimeter and sub-millimeter feature sizes. Furthermore, we present comprehensive experimental characterization of finite, simple cubic lattices in terms of wave polarization and propagation direction to demonstrate the substantial differences between complete phononic band gap and application oriented directional band gaps of selected propagation modes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Phononics)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Galloping Reduction of Transmission Lines by Using Phononic Crystal
Crystals 2017, 7(11), 346; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst7110346
Received: 2 November 2017 / Accepted: 10 November 2017 / Published: 13 November 2017
PDF Full-text (4832 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Considering the combination of the transmission lines and phononic crystals (PCs), we propose a new method to solve the problem of the galloping of overhead transmission lines. The method has two key points: attaching the suitable mass-spring system on each spacer, and periodically [...] Read more.
Considering the combination of the transmission lines and phononic crystals (PCs), we propose a new method to solve the problem of the galloping of overhead transmission lines. The method has two key points: attaching the suitable mass-spring system on each spacer, and periodically arranging the modified spacers along a transmission line. Based on the Bloch’s theorem, the PC transmission lines could generate vibration band gaps (BGs), which would reduce galloping. In order to implement our point, we establish the two-dimensional model of the PC transmission lines and derive the transfer matrix method to calculate the frequency dispersion relation of the vertical transverse vibration. Then, the extremely low frequency BG, in the range of galloping frequency, is obtained and verified based on an example of single conductor. To widen the BG range, we also study the effects of the spacer and the attached mass-spring system on the BG. The wide BG, which even covers the range of 0.338–0.909 Hz, could be given just by using the suitable setting of the spacer and mass-spring system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Phononics)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Band Structures Analysis Method of Two-Dimensional Phononic Crystals Using Wavelet-Based Elements
Crystals 2017, 7(11), 328; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst7110328
Received: 12 September 2017 / Revised: 17 October 2017 / Accepted: 27 October 2017 / Published: 31 October 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1994 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A wavelet-based finite element method (WFEM) is developed to calculate the elastic band structures of two-dimensional phononic crystals (2DPCs), which are composed of square lattices of solid cuboids in a solid matrix. In a unit cell, a new model of band-gap calculation of [...] Read more.
A wavelet-based finite element method (WFEM) is developed to calculate the elastic band structures of two-dimensional phononic crystals (2DPCs), which are composed of square lattices of solid cuboids in a solid matrix. In a unit cell, a new model of band-gap calculation of 2DPCs is constructed using plane elastomechanical elements based on a B-spline wavelet on the interval (BSWI). Substituting the periodic boundary conditions (BCs) and interface conditions, a linear eigenvalue problem dependent on the Bloch wave vector is derived. Numerical examples show that the proposed method performs well for band structure problems when compared with those calculated by traditional FEM. This study also illustrates that filling fractions, material parameters, and incline angles of a 2DPC structure can cause band-gap width and location changes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Phononics)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Longitudinal Near-Field Coupling between Acoustic Resonators Grafted onto a Waveguide
Crystals 2017, 7(11), 323; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst7110323
Received: 3 October 2017 / Revised: 20 October 2017 / Accepted: 23 October 2017 / Published: 26 October 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1827 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
We investigate longitudinal near-field coupling between acoustic resonators grafted along a waveguide. Experiments are performed in the audible range with a simple acoustic system composed of a finite aperiodic sequence of air resonators. Transmission typically shows a zero around a resonance frequency of [...] Read more.
We investigate longitudinal near-field coupling between acoustic resonators grafted along a waveguide. Experiments are performed in the audible range with a simple acoustic system composed of a finite aperiodic sequence of air resonators. Transmission typically shows a zero around a resonance frequency of a single resonator, as is well known. When two identical resonators are brought in close proximity, however, we observe that longitudinal near-field coupling strongly influences the acoustic transmission. When the separation between resonators is increased so that they can be considered in the far field of one another, we further observe the appearance of Fano-like transmission profiles. We explain this observation by the formation of locally resonant Fabry-Perot interferometers from every pair of resonators. All experimental results are compared to three-dimensional finite element analysis of the acoustic system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Phononics)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Crystals EISSN 2073-4352 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top