Special Issue "Carbonates Volume II"

A special issue of Crystals (ISSN 2073-4352). This special issue belongs to the section "Crystalline Minerals and Biominerals".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Linda Pastero
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Earth Sciences, Interdepartmental Centre “Nanostructured Interfaces and Surfaces-NIS”, University of Torino, Italy
Interests: crystal growth; epitaxy; surface; interface; calcite; gypsum; apatite; zeolite
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Even though the study of the minerals belonging to the group of carbonates is a longstanding and sound out topic, its relevance remains unchanged, due to the countless implications for a wide range of disciplines, from mineralogy and geology to biology, medicine, and industry. Moreover, the study of the interactions between carbonates and other minerals, such as phosphates, or between carbonates and organics, may disclose new opportunities for understanding the mechanisms involved in natural phenomena, such as biomineralization.

The goal of this Special Issue on "Carbonates"; is to provide a comprehensive overview about both the state-of-the-art and recent advances in crystal growth and characterization of carbonate phases, pointing out the mechanisms of growth, the interactions among phases, and the applications.
Scientists working in a wide range of disciplines are invited to contribute to this Special Issue.

The topics may include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Natural and synthetic carbonates
  • Crystal growth of carbonates
  • Epitaxial relationships
  • Twinning
  • Bioinspired/biomimetic materials
  • Inorganic/organic self-organized materials (nacreous-like materials)
  • Inorganic complex systems (such as carbonate/phosphate for example)
  • Applications

Dr. Linda Pastero
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Crystals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • carbonates
  • crystal growth
  • epitaxy
  • self-organized materials
  • bio-mineralogy
  • bio-inspired materials
  • bio-mimetic materials
  • environmental mineralogy

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Carboxylic Polymers with Low Molecular Weight as Inhibitors for Calcium Carbonate Scale
Crystals 2020, 10(5), 406; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst10050406 - 19 May 2020
Abstract
Poly acrylic acid (PAA) and polyepoxysuccinic acid (PESA) were investigated as scale inhibitors. The static experiments certified that PAA was superior to PESA for the inhibition of calcium carbonate in the low molecular weight range. The X-ray diffraction patterns suggest that the effect [...] Read more.
Poly acrylic acid (PAA) and polyepoxysuccinic acid (PESA) were investigated as scale inhibitors. The static experiments certified that PAA was superior to PESA for the inhibition of calcium carbonate in the low molecular weight range. The X-ray diffraction patterns suggest that the effect of PAA on the calcite (1 0 4) and (1 1 0) crystal plane was more obvious. Scanning electron microscopy was used to study the surface morphology of the depositions, which indicated that the addition of scale inhibitors could disturb the normal growth of CaCO3 scale. The transmittance ratio of ferric oxide demonstrated that PAA had a better dispersion performance than PESA. The molecular dynamics simulation and quantum calculation were selected to theoretically explore the mechanism and structure of scale inhibitors, indicating that the interaction of PAA with (1 0 4) and (1 1 0) calcite crystal surfaces was stronger than PESA. In addition, the results indicated that the PAA with negative charge more easily adsorbed free Ca2+ in the aqueous phase. Based on these observations, PAA exhibited better scale inhibition and dispersion effects than PESA in the case of low molecular weight. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbonates Volume II)
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Open AccessArticle
Formation and Inhibition of Calcium Carbonate Crystals under Cathodic Polarization Conditions
Crystals 2020, 10(4), 275; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst10040275 - 06 Apr 2020
Abstract
The formation of CaCO3 crystals on the cathode surface and the scale-inhibition performance of scale inhibitor 2-phosphonobutane-1,2,4-tricarboxylic acid (PBTCA) on the cathode surface were studied by methods of solution analysis, gravimetric analysis, SEM, FTIR, and XRD techniques. They were then compared with [...] Read more.
The formation of CaCO3 crystals on the cathode surface and the scale-inhibition performance of scale inhibitor 2-phosphonobutane-1,2,4-tricarboxylic acid (PBTCA) on the cathode surface were studied by methods of solution analysis, gravimetric analysis, SEM, FTIR, and XRD techniques. They were then compared with the results of the formation and suppression of CaCO3 crystals in aqueous solution. PBTCA had a good solution-scale-inhibition performance and good lattice-distortion effects on CaCO3 crystals in solution, which could change the CaCO3 from calcite to vaterite and aragonite crystals. The solution-scale-inhibition efficiency exceeded 97% when the PBTCA concentration reached 8 mg/L. Under cathodic polarization conditions, the surface-scale-inhibition efficiency of the cathode and solution-scale-inhibition efficiency near the cathode surface both exceed 97% at polarization potential of −1V. The addition of PBTCA significantly reduced the amount of CaCO3 crystals formed on the cathode surface and had good surface and solution-scale-inhibition effect. However, the lattice-distortion effect of PBTCA on CaCO3 crystals disappeared on the cathode surface, and the resulting CaCO3 contained only calcite crystals. The high-scale-inhibition effect of PBTCA under cathodic polarization was mainly due to the inhibition of the formation of calcium carbonate crystals by PBTCA, and not because of the lattice distortion of CaCO3 crystals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbonates Volume II)
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Open AccessArticle
Crystallization of CaCO3 in Aqueous Solutions with Extremely High Concentrations of NaCl
Crystals 2019, 9(12), 647; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst9120647 - 06 Dec 2019
Abstract
The effect of NaCl at extremely high concentrations from 3.5 to 14 wt. % on the crystallization of CaCO3 was investigated in depth. The static test experiment verified that the Ca2+ retention efficiency (η) of NaCl on CaCO3 [...] Read more.
The effect of NaCl at extremely high concentrations from 3.5 to 14 wt. % on the crystallization of CaCO3 was investigated in depth. The static test experiment verified that the Ca2+ retention efficiency (η) of NaCl on CaCO3 scale increased from 31.06% (3.5 wt. %) to 41.56% (14 wt. %). Based on the calculation of supersaturation rations, the high concentration of NaCl could reduce the activity coefficients of [Ca2+] and [CO32−], thus reducing the actual concentration of CaCO3. The CaCO3 deposition rate constants (k) showed that NaCl slowed down the rate of CaCO3 crystallization. The X–ray diffraction (XRD) testing disclosed that the growth of (1 0 4) and (1 1 0) faces from calcite was impeded, while the formation of (1 1 1) face from aragonite was induced by the increasing concentration of NaCl. The inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP–OES) results indicated that Na+ could be doped into CaCO3, leading to the one–dimensional crystal growth. It was further proved that NaCl heightens the efficiency of the typical phosphate inhibitors (2–phosphonobutane–1,2,4–tricarboxylic acid (PBTCA) and 1–hydroxyethane–1,1–diphosphonic acid (HEDP)) on prohibiting the scale of CaCO3. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbonates Volume II)
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