A New Frontier in Biomineral Interactions and Biomineralization

A special issue of Crystals (ISSN 2073-4352). This special issue belongs to the section "Mineralogical Crystallography and Biomineralization".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2022) | Viewed by 3492

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Crystallography, Saint Petersburg State University, Saint Petersburg (ex Leningrad), Russia
Interests: structural mineralogy; applied mineralogy; biomineralization; crystal chemistry; preservation of cultural heritage

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Guest Editor
Department of Crystallography, Saint Petersburg State University, Saint Petersburg (ex Leningrad), Russia
Interests: ecology of microorganisms; mycology; lithobiotic communities; bioweathering; microbial biomineralization; biodeterioration of materials

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Guest Editor
Department of Crystallography, Saint Petersburg State University, Saint Petersburg (ex Leningrad), Russia
Interests: Biomineralogy; crystallogenesis; organic mineralogy; organomineral composites

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Guest Editor
Sektion Kristallographie, Department für Geo- und Umweltwissenschaften, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, D-80333 München, Germany
Interests: biomineralization; crystallization and nanoparticle assembly processes; biomimetic/bioinspired materials; functional nanostructured and composite materials; electron microscopy applied to materials research
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We welcome original research papers and reviews covering biomineral interactions and biomineralization. We look forward to receiving results on biomineral interactions in the environment (water, soil, etc.) and living organisms, including humans. We propose that the unique phenomenon of biomineralization be considered as widely as possible, encompassing a variety of crystallization processes that occur in living organisms or with their active participation. We await research results on the findings of biominerals in nature (including in land plants), on the modeling of their formation, crystal chemistry, and unique properties. We also look forward to receiving new data on bone structure, the development of new nature-like materials, and modern biotechnology.

Prof. Dr. Olga Frank-Kamenetskaya
Prof. Dr. Dmitry Vlasov
Dr. Alina Izatulina
Dr. Elena Sturm
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • biomineral interactions in soil and water
  • environment phenomena
  • biomineralization
  • pathogenic crystallization in a living organism
  • microbe induced mineral formation
  • biominerals in nature
  • structure and properties of bone tissue
  • biological apatite
  • magnetic biominerals
  • design of biomimetic and bioinspired materials
  • nature‐like biotechnologies

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 2325 KiB  
Article
Spatiotemporal Changes in Atomic and Molecular Architecture of Mineralized Bone under Pathogenic Conditions
by Andrey A. Pavlychev, Xenia O. Brykalova, Alexander A. Cherny, Anatoliy V. Korneev and Nikolai N. Kornilov
Crystals 2023, 13(3), 381; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst13030381 - 23 Feb 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1020
Abstract
Mechanisms responsible for spatiotemporal changes in the atomic-molecular architecture of the human femur in intact and osteoarthritis-affected areas were studied using high-resolution X-ray diffraction and spectroscopic techniques. Comparison of the experimental data demonstrates strong deviations of core electron-binding energies, lattice constants of hydroxyapatite [...] Read more.
Mechanisms responsible for spatiotemporal changes in the atomic-molecular architecture of the human femur in intact and osteoarthritis-affected areas were studied using high-resolution X-ray diffraction and spectroscopic techniques. Comparison of the experimental data demonstrates strong deviations of core electron-binding energies, lattice constants of hydroxyapatite crystal cells, linear sizes of crystallites, and degrees of crystallinity for both intact and osteoarthritic areas. The quantitative values of these characteristics and their standard deviations in each area are measured and presented. A systematic analysis of the site-dependent deviations was carried out within the framework of the 3D superlattice model. It is argued that the main mechanism responsible for the deviations arises primarily as a result of carbonization and catalytic reactions at the mineral-cartilage interface. The impact of the mechanism is enhanced in the vicinities of the area of sclerosed bone, but not inside the area where mechanical loads are maximum. Restoration of the atomic-molecular architecture of mineralized bone in the sclerosis area is revealed. Statistical aspects of the spatiotemporal changes in mineralized bone under pathogenic conditions are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue A New Frontier in Biomineral Interactions and Biomineralization)
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17 pages, 7128 KiB  
Article
Extremely Fast and Efficient Removal of Congo Red Using Cationic-Incorporated Hydroxyapatite Nanoparticles (HAp: X (X = Fe, Ni, Zn, Co, and Ag))
by Sandeep Eswaran Panchu, Saranya Sekar, Elayaraja Kolanthai, Moorthy Babu Sridharan and Narayana Kalkura Subbaraya
Crystals 2023, 13(2), 209; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst13020209 - 24 Jan 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1709
Abstract
Congo red (CR) is a stable anionic diazo dye that causes allergic reactions with carcinogenic properties. The rapid removal of CR using cation-incorporated nanohydroxyapatite (pristine HAp: X (X = Fe, Ni, Zn, Co, and Ag)) was investigated. The pristine and cation ion-doped HAp [...] Read more.
Congo red (CR) is a stable anionic diazo dye that causes allergic reactions with carcinogenic properties. The rapid removal of CR using cation-incorporated nanohydroxyapatite (pristine HAp: X (X = Fe, Ni, Zn, Co, and Ag)) was investigated. The pristine and cation ion-doped HAp adsorbents were coprecipitated and subjected to hydrothermal and ultrasound treatments and subsequent microwave drying. The dopant ions significantly engineered the crystallite size, crystallinity, particle size (decreased 38–77%), shape (a rod to sphere modification by the incorporation of Ag+, Ni2+, and Co2+ ions), and colloidal stability (CS) of the adsorbent. These modifications aided in the rapid removal of the CR dye (98%) within one minute, and the CR adsorption rate was found to be significantly higher (93–99%) compared to previously reported rates. Furthermore, the kinetic, Langmuir, Freundlich, and DKR isotherms and thermodynamic results confirmed that the CR adsorption on the HAp was due to the strong chemical adsorption process. The order of the maximum CR adsorption capacity was Fe-HAp > HAp > Ag-HAp > Co-HAp > Zn-HAp. Whereas the CR regeneration efficiency was Fe-HAp (92%) > Ag-HAp (42%) > Ni-HAp (30%), with the other adsorbents exhibiting a poor recycling efficiency (1–16%). These results reveal Fe-HAp as a potential adsorbent for removing CR without the formation of byproducts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue A New Frontier in Biomineral Interactions and Biomineralization)
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