Special Issue "Liquid Crystal Optics and Physics: Recent Advances and Prospects"

A special issue of Crystals (ISSN 2073-4352). This special issue belongs to the section "Liquid Crystals".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 July 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Chun-Ta Wang

Department of Photonics, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan
Website | E-Mail
Interests: liquid crystal optics, chiral-nematic liquid crystal, blue phase, photo-aligning technique for LC devices, soft-matter physics, silicon photonics
Co-Guest Editor
Prof. Chan-Shan Yang

1. Institute of Electro-Optical Science and Technology, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan
2. Undergraduate Program of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Terahertz Photonics; Liquid Crystal Optics; Graphene (& 2D materials) Optoelectronics; Ultrafast Photonics; Nonlinear Optics
Co-Guest Editor
Dr. Qi Guo

School of Instrumentation and Optoelectronic Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing, China
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Ferroelectric liquid crystal; photoalignment of LC; liquid crystal photonics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Liquid crystals (LC) have been extensively investigated for more than 100 years. They possess orientational/positional orders as a crystalline solid and fluidity as a liquid. Surprisingly, there are a number of physical properties that are unique to LC, including large physical anisotropies and viscoelasticity, and high susceptibility to external stimuli. Therefore, LCs are oftentimes the best optical material for applications ranging from displays to sensors and photonic circuits. LC optics and physics are still growing fields of research, and many scientific and technological breakthroughs have been made over the past few years. Emerging display technologies, such as see-through displays, augmented reality (AR), and virtual reality (VR) display systems, have been developed and created new design/application possibilities. Low power consumption also makes LC promising for energy-saving applications such as smart windows. For photonic applications, diffractive optical elements based on LCs realized by a patterned surface are powerful tools for complex spatial field shaping; photonic-crystalline LCs (e.g., cholesteric and blue phases) are employed for manipulating light spectrally and/or temporally and generating lasers. Besides the technological advances, fundamental physics research on topics such as topological defects and nonlinear optics are also of great interest. LCs are known to possess a wide variety of collective nonlinear optical phenomena, and countless types of topological defects are easily generated and manipulated in LCs. At last, we would like to note that LC optics have been expanded from the traditional UV–Vis–NIR spectrum to mid-IR, THz, and microwave regimes, thanks to their ultra-broadband birefringence.

This Special Issue is aimed at both basic and applied research, concentrating on the optics and physics of Liquid Crystals, as well as their use in various applications. Besides original research articles, we also encourage submission of review papers on recent advances and future prospects of LC technologies and challenges. Topics for the feature issue will include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Topological defects and nanoparticle self-assembly
  • Optical properties and applications of LCs in mid-IR, THz, and microwave regimes
  • Nonlinear optics (e.g., EFISH and photorefractive effect)
  • Multi-stable operations in LCs and their applications (e.g., smart optical switches, energy-saving windows, and reflective displays)
  • Flat optics: diffractive (geometric-phase) optical elements based on photoalignment (e.g., optic-axis grating, q plate, and lens)
  • Novel display technologies (e.g., transparent, AR, VR, and holographic displays)
  • Bio, chemical, and vibration sensors
  • Photonic-crystalline LCs (e.g., chiral nematic, chiral smectic, and blue phases) and LC-infiltrated photonic crystals

Active integrated photonic devices (e.g., waveguide, fiber, photonic crystal, metamaterials, and plasmonics)

Prof. Chun-Ta Wang
Dr. Qi Guo
Prof. Chan-Shan Yang
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Crystals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • LC defects
  • LC nonlinear optics
  • LC flat-optics
  • Photonic-crystalline LCs
  • LC displays/sensors/integrated photonic devices

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
A Fast-Response and Helicity-Dependent Lens Enabled by Micro-Patterned Dual-Frequency Liquid Crystals
Crystals 2019, 9(2), 111; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst9020111
Received: 7 January 2019 / Revised: 6 February 2019 / Accepted: 16 February 2019 / Published: 20 February 2019
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Abstract
Liquid crystals are excellent candidates for tunable optical elements due to their large birefringence and continuous tunability by external fields. A dual-frequency liquid crystal lens integrated with Pancharatnam–Berry phase was fabricated via a dynamic photo-patterning technique. The proposed lens exhibited distinctive polarization-dependent characteristics [...] Read more.
Liquid crystals are excellent candidates for tunable optical elements due to their large birefringence and continuous tunability by external fields. A dual-frequency liquid crystal lens integrated with Pancharatnam–Berry phase was fabricated via a dynamic photo-patterning technique. The proposed lens exhibited distinctive polarization-dependent characteristics and ultra-high efficiency rates of up to 95%. Via merely alternating the frequency of the applied electric field, the switching time between unfocused and focused states was measured in submilliseconds. This work supplies a new strategy for fast-response, high-efficiency and helicity-dependent lens with merits of easy fabrication and low power consumption. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Liquid Crystal Optics and Physics: Recent Advances and Prospects)
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Open AccessArticle
Parameter Space Design of a Guest-Host Liquid Crystal Device for Transmittance Control
Crystals 2019, 9(2), 63; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst9020063
Received: 4 December 2018 / Revised: 31 December 2018 / Accepted: 22 January 2019 / Published: 26 January 2019
PDF Full-text (3339 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A transmittance-control device requires a high transmittance difference between its transparent and opaque states. In this paper, we propose a systematic approach to find the condition for the maximum transmittance difference in a guest-host liquid crystal (GHLC) cell. To this end, we calculated [...] Read more.
A transmittance-control device requires a high transmittance difference between its transparent and opaque states. In this paper, we propose a systematic approach to find the condition for the maximum transmittance difference in a guest-host liquid crystal (GHLC) cell. To this end, we calculated the transmittance difference as we varied the cell gap and dye concentration. The transmittance of a GHLC cell is dependent on the alignment of dye molecules, cell gap, and dye concentration. We used a constant-transmittance contour map to find the condition for the desired transmittance of LC cells in each state and the transmittance difference of each LC mode. We experimentally confirmed that the design of a GHLC cell with the desired performance could be achieved through the proposed design process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Liquid Crystal Optics and Physics: Recent Advances and Prospects)
Figures

Graphical abstract

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