Special Issue "Skin Aging"

A special issue of Cosmetics (ISSN 2079-9284).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Clara Barba
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
CSIC - Instituto de Quimica Avanzada de Cataluna (IQAC), Department of Chemical and Surfactants Technology, Barcelona, Spain
Interests: Skin structure; Barrier function; Aging; Anti-aging; Antioxidants; Chronological aging; photoaging

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Signs of aging become evident as life progresses, and skin changes constitute the first obvious evidence of the aging process. Skin ages in both men and women through parallel internal and external processes, which contribute simultaneously to a progressive loss of skin integrity. During the aging process, the three-layer skin system changes markedly. There is an increased interest by the cosmetic industry in developing new molecules with the capacity of supporting dermal extracellular matrix organization, essentially improving it and avoiding skin aging.

This Special Issue, "Skin Aging", is aimed at presenting the newest scientific investigations based on both an understanding of the complex processes of skin aging and the study of new molecules, which can be essential for their incorporation in cosmetic products, which fight against skin aging. This overview of the current knowledge in this field will be provided through original papers, reviews and short communications.

Dr. Clara Barba
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cosmetics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Skin structure
  • Barrier function
  • Aging
  • Anti-aging
  • Antioxidants
  • Chronological aging
  • photoaging

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
The Anti-Aging Potential of Extracts from Chaenomeles sinensis
Cosmetics 2019, 6(1), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics6010021 - 18 Mar 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
The Chaenomeles sinensis fruit is used as an effective antitussive agent, analgesic, and diuretic in traditional Chinese medicine. It has been reported that C. sinensis fruit extracts have antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory effects. However, there are very few reports about the effects of C. [...] Read more.
The Chaenomeles sinensis fruit is used as an effective antitussive agent, analgesic, and diuretic in traditional Chinese medicine. It has been reported that C. sinensis fruit extracts have antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory effects. However, there are very few reports about the effects of C. sinensis extracts on skin. In this study, we investigated the effect of C. sinensis extracts on skin aging. The results of in vitro assays showed that whole fruit extracts of C. sinensis had superoxide dismutase (SOD)-like activity and inhibited the activity of dermal extracellular matrix proteases: Elastase and collagenase. The inhibitory effect of the whole fruit (containing seeds) extract on elastase activity was higher than that of the sarcocarp (seeds removed) extract. Further, the sarcocarp extract showed a higher level of SOD-like activity and a greater inhibitory effect on collagenase activity than the whole fruit extract. In particular, among the three activities studied, the sarcocarp extract showed the most significant inhibitory effect on collagenase activity at low concentrations. The polyphenol-rich fraction obtained from the sarcocarp showed significant collagenase inhibition. Based on these results, we concluded that phenolic compounds from C. sinensis sarcocarp have the potential to protect against skin aging through anti-collagenase activity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Skin Aging)
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Open AccessArticle
Review of Modern Techniques for the Assessment of Skin Hydration
Cosmetics 2019, 6(1), 19; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics6010019 - 09 Mar 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Skin hydration is a complex process that influences the physical and mechanical properties of skin. Various technologies have emerged over the years to assess this parameter, with the current standard being electrical probe-based instruments. Nevertheless, their inability to provide detailed information has prompted [...] Read more.
Skin hydration is a complex process that influences the physical and mechanical properties of skin. Various technologies have emerged over the years to assess this parameter, with the current standard being electrical probe-based instruments. Nevertheless, their inability to provide detailed information has prompted the use of sophisticated spectroscopic and imaging methodologies, which are capable of in-depth skin analysis that includes structural and composition details. Modern imaging and spectroscopic techniques have transformed skin research in the dermatological and cosmetics disciplines, and are now commonly employed in conjunction with traditional methods for comprehensive assessment of both healthy and pathological skin. This article reviews current techniques employed in measuring skin hydration, and gives an account on their principle of operation and applications in skin-related research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Skin Aging)
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Open AccessArticle
Design Methodology for the Development of a New Cosmetic Active Based on Prunus domestica L. Leaves Extract
Cosmetics 2019, 6(1), 8; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics6010008 - 29 Jan 2019
Abstract
When it comes to the development of new active ingredients for cosmetics, biodiversity is a rich source for inspiration that must be tapped in a sustainable manner to cause no social nor ecological damage. Agri-food by-products are therefore more and more considered as [...] Read more.
When it comes to the development of new active ingredients for cosmetics, biodiversity is a rich source for inspiration that must be tapped in a sustainable manner to cause no social nor ecological damage. Agri-food by-products are therefore more and more considered as available biomass that can be reused to extract their maximum value to produce new cosmetic ingredients before returning to the biosphere. The process to transform plant waste materials into powerful cosmetic actives is thoroughly described in the present paper via the example of the design of a liquid anti-aging ingredient based on a Prunus domestica L. extract obtained by maceration of plums’ dried leaves in propylene glycol. The subsequent development of an SPE (solid-phase extraction) methodology used to remove the propylene glycol to get access to the extracted molecules is thoroughly described as a means to follow the stability of the ingredient over time once formulated into a finished product. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Skin Aging)
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