Special Issue "Rechargeable Batteries Studied Using Advanced Spectroscopic and Computational Techniques"

A special issue of Condensed Matter (ISSN 2410-3896).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 December 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Bernardo Barbiellini

Department of Physics, School of Engineering Science, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Lappeenranta, Finland
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Interests: theoretical physics; density functional theory; computational materials science; X-ray spectroscopy; positron spectroscopy
Guest Editor
Dr. Jan Kuriplach

Department of Low Temperature Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic
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Interests: condensed matter theory; computational physics; positron condensed matter physics; hyperfine interactions
Guest Editor
Dr. Rolando Saniz

Department of Physics, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium
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Phone: +32 3 265 3433
Interests: condensed matter theory; computational materials science; superconductivity; positron spectroscopy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A complete understanding of the principles and mechanisms underlying the functioning of rechargeable batteries has not been reached, in spite of several decades of research. The present Special Issue topic, on modern spectroscopy techniques and first principles computations applied to rechearchable batteries, will help unravel relationships between key battery characteristics and the nature of the electronic orbitals involved in intercalation reactions. The issue aims at providing fundamental insight into how batteries work, as well as validating standard diagnostics and characterization techniques, which mostly probe the average behavior of the battery as a whole. We expect that the findings presented in this special issue will facilitate better battery designs and better power management concepts towards alleviating battery aging, as well as a deeper understanding of underlying physical principles. For example, one of the main challenges in the development of large-scale batteries is to monitor inhomogeneous positive ion distribution in the electrodes. Improved uniformity lowers the damaging mechanical stress on the electrodes and improves battery cyclability. These and other important issues can be studied with spectroscopy, and computational modeling and simulations.

Sincerely yours,

Prof. Bernardo Barbiellini
Dr. Jan Kuriplach
Dr. Rolando Saniz
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Condensed Matter is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Li-ion Battery
  • Na-ion Battery
  • Li-air Battery
  • Spectroscopy Techniques for Batteries
  • First Principles Calculations
  • Cathode Materials
  • Anode Materials
  • Electrolytes
  • Li Diffusion and Intercalation

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Dependency of the Charge–Discharge Rate on Lithium Reaction Distributions for a Commercial Lithium Coin Cell Visualized by Compton Scattering Imaging
Condens. Matter 2018, 3(3), 27; https://doi.org/10.3390/condmat3030027
Received: 23 August 2018 / Revised: 11 September 2018 / Accepted: 13 September 2018 / Published: 19 September 2018
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Abstract
In this study, lithium reaction distributions, dependent on the charge–discharge rate, were non-destructively visualized for a commercial lithium-ion battery, using the Compton scattering imaging technique. By comparing lithium reaction distributions obtained at two different charge–discharge speeds, residual lithium ions were detected at the
[...] Read more.
In this study, lithium reaction distributions, dependent on the charge–discharge rate, were non-destructively visualized for a commercial lithium-ion battery, using the Compton scattering imaging technique. By comparing lithium reaction distributions obtained at two different charge–discharge speeds, residual lithium ions were detected at the center of the negative electrode in a fully discharged state, at a relatively high-speed discharge rate. Moreover, we confirmed that inhomogeneous reactions were facilitated at a relatively high-speed charge–discharge rate, in both the negative and positive electrodes. A feature of our technique is that it can be applied to commercially used lithium-ion batteries, because it uses high-energy X-rays with high penetration power. Our technique thus opens a novel analyzing pathway for developing advanced batteries. Full article
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